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Following on from the success of last year’s Military Data Fusion conference we are once again bringing together the international specialists within the data fusion field and tackling the issues that matter. Military Data Fusion II offers a unique opportunity to hear from a leading international panel of speakers at the cutting edge of data fusion.

Following the comments of last year’s speakers and delegates we shall address such issues as implementing data fusion systems, guidelines for architecture selection and system design, and examine the methods used to evaluate and test systems. SMi’s first Military Data Fusion conference attracted over 100 attendees from 17 countries.

Please register now to guarantee your place at this important conference.

Conference programme

8:30 Registration and Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Malcolm Mills

Malcolm Mills, Account Director, IBM Defence and Aerospace

9:10 KEYNOTE ADDRESS

Colonel Clint G Wallace

Colonel Clint G Wallace, Chief, Data Fusion and Common Operational Picture Division, AC2A/C2F, US Air Force

  • The aims and objectives behind the common operational picture
  • An analysis of the criteria for developing data fusion systems capable of producing the COP
  • The role and development of the Global Command and Control System - the component systems analysed
  • An examination of the types of data and sensors required to complete the COP and how such data is fused effectively
  • The operational and technological difficulties associated with existing platforms
  • Will the COP ever be achieved? - an overview of current developments
  • 9:40 CASE STUDY

    Lieutenant Colonel Harry Greene, Product Manager, Aerial Common Sensor

    Lieutenant Colonel Harry Greene, Product Manager, Aerial Common Sensor, Richard Wittstruck, Deputy Product Manager, Aerial Common Sensor, US Army

  • Methodology for the use of imagery, signals and measurements/signature intelligence for making tactical decisions
  • The US Army development activities for achieving near real time reporting and dissemination on the battlefield
  • The programmatic challenges faced during the project
  • An operational analysis of the component systems, hardware and software
  • The challenge - effective multi-sensor data fusion
  • The future of data fusion systems - ensuring commonality in future sensor data
  • 10:20 HIGH PERFORMANCE ALGORITHMS

    Dr Anna Tsao

    Dr Anna Tsao, Research Staff Member, Center for Computing Sciences, Institute for Defense Analyses

  • The importance of high performance algorithms in the development of operational data fusion systems
  • The operational requirements of military information systems and how they are incorporated into the development of high performance algorithms
  • An overview of current operational difficulties experienced as a result of a lack of system integration
  • The tests undertaken to ensure reliability in the practical application of new algorithms
  • An in-depth look at the current developments in the development, design, operation and integration of algorithms in data fusion systems
  • Future research and developments in algorithms
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 BATTLESPACE DATA MANAGEMENT

    Lieutenant Colonel Peter Nell

    Lieutenant Colonel Peter Nell, SO1 Data Services, British Army

  • Challenges of data management in the battlespace
  • The Army Common Object Model (ACOM)
  • Concepts for battlespace data management
  • The way forward
  • 12:00 STANDARDISING DATA FUSION ARCHITECTURES

    Major Ian Glenn

    Major Ian Glenn, Project Director ISTAR, Canadian Army

  • The need for interoperability between data fusion systems of different nations and services
  • The NATO Common Operating Environment (COE) to allow increased interoperability of software components
  • The need for a comprehensive set of algorithms
  • The search for a common architecture
  • Taking full advantage of the data available in a NATO coalition
  • The goal of creating a multi-source data fusion centre supporting the tactical commander
  • 12:40 Lunch

    14:00 TARGET TRACKING AND SENSOR FUSION

    Dr Rabinder N Madan

    Dr Rabinder N Madan, Program Officer, Office of Naval Research

  • An overview of current target tracking capabilities
  • Coping with non-target obstacles
  • Sensor resource management
  • Countering the countermeasure
  • Fusing the multiple sensors
  • Likely future developments in target tracking and sensor fusion technologies
  • 14:40 THE JOINT OPERATIONAL PICTURE

    Dr Paul King

    Dr Paul King, Principal Consultant, Crew Services

  • User requirements
  • The JOP as an Information Manager
  • Technical requirements
  • The JOP as an integration framework
  • The implementation framework
  • Implementation technology
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 INDUSTRY DATA FUSION DEVELOPMENTS

    John McAlonan

    John McAlonan, Director, Business Development, Advanced Programming Concepts

  • The tactical C2 environment
  • Integrating different types of data
  • Supporting joint operations
  • Real-world challenges
  • 16:20 INFORMATION SUPERIORITY

    Alan Steinberg

    Alan Steinberg, Technical Director, Data Fusion, ERIM International

  • Needs for tactical and strategic information superiority in conflict, competitive and co-operative environments
  • JV2010 and network-centric operations: coordinating sensing, understanding and response
  • Targets of information superiority: physical, informational and perceptual targets
  • Estimating and predicting the human target
  • Information superiority technology needs: global state estimation, unified inferencing, uncertainty representation, coordinated adaptivity
  • 17:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    17:10 Informal Networking Drinks Reception for Speakers and Delegates

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Jeremy Barrett

    Jeremy Barrett, Head of Strategic Development, Hi-Q Systems

    9:10 THE DATA FUSION REVOLUTION

    Frank White, Director, Program Development, D101, SPAWAR Systems Center San Diego, US Navy

    Frank White, Director, Program Development, D101, SPAWAR Systems Center San Diego, US Navy, , Otto Kessler, Product Manager, DDB, DARPA

  • The projected growth in military data fusion requirements
  • The critical technologies to meet these requirements
  • The technical challenges facing current systems
  • Architectures for integrating sensors, data links and management systems
  • Decision support tools for managing operator work load
  • The expected advances from current development programmes
  • 9:40 UNDERWATER SENSOR FUSION

    Roger Benton

    Roger Benton, Section Leader Algorithmic Development, Thomson Marconi Sonar

  • Requirement for sensor and multi sensor data fusion within modern sonar systems
  • Data fusion, classification and the Human Computer Interface (HCI) in a multi sensor sonar system
  • Future developments in multi sensor data fusion
  • Improved data processing to extract more information from the raw data
  • The role of classification in the fusion process
  • HCI
  • 10:20 SWEDISH RESEARCH ADVANCES

    Dr Henrik Egnell

    Dr Henrik Egnell, Staff Scientist, CelsiusTech Systems

  • The ever increasing demand for digitized systems in the military
  • An examination of some of the logistical and technical problems experienced by existing systems
  • An overview of the latest developments currently being undertaken
  • The methods used for testing and evaluating the projects
  • The potential commercial benefits of data fusion research
  • The future of C2 systems in light of data fusion research and development
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 DATA FUSION TEST BED FOR INCREMENTAL EVOLUTION OF DECISION SUPPORT CAPABILITIES

    Dr Elisa Shahbazian

    Dr Elisa Shahbazian, Director Research and Development, Lockheed Martin Canada

  • The projected growth in military data fusion requirements
  • The critical technologies to meet these requirements
  • The technical challenges facing current systems
  • Level one, two, three and four data fusion
  • Enhancing capabilities of the command and control system
  • Adding capabilities and new technological developments incrementally
  • 12:00 UK DATA FUSION SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT

    David Whitaker

    David Whitaker, Group Manager, DERA

  • The aims and objectives of the UK MoD in their data fusion development programme
  • The operational and logistical difficulties associated with current data fusion systems
  • The role of data fusion systems and the techniques used to achieve fusion
  • An examination of the current research areas and programs
  • The future challenges and research directions of data fusion systems
  • 12:40 Lunch

    14:00 LAND SYSTEMS

    John Kent

    John Kent, Principal Consultant, Hi-Q Systems

  • Beyond targeting - situation management
  • The problems of enterprise-wide fusion
  • Lessons from commerce, research, and Digitisation stage 1
  • Appropriate tools for the man in the loop
  • 14:40 SYSTEMS ENGINEERING FOR DATA FUSION

    Dr David Hall

    Dr David Hall, Associate Director, Applied Research Laboratory, Pennsylvania State University

  • Challenges in data fusion (what we can and cannot do)
  • Structured methods for requirements analysis, algorithm selection and architecture selection
  • Resources in data fusion
  • Pitfalls (and how to avoid them)
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 THE DANISH APPROACH

    Christian Birkemark

    Christian Birkemark, EW and Signal Processing Section, DDRE (Denmark)

  • An overview of the Danish approach to the concept of data fusion
  • An alternative approach for fusion of data at the platform level
  • How can this be compared to other methodologies
  • A concept for the fusion of the EW sensor suite data in fighter aircraft
  • Likely future developments in the data fusion field in Denmark
  • 16:20 CASE STUDY - AN AUSTRALIAN PERSPECTIVE

    Dr R Hughes

    Dr R Hughes, Head, R&D, Australian Theatre Joint Intelligence Centre

  • An overview of current Australian capabilities
  • A joint approach - ensuring quality intelligence throughout the battlespace
  • The problems balancing cost, COTS and interoperability issues
  • Implementing a data fusion system - problems, solutions
  • Testing and evaluating the system
  • Likely future costs balancing cost and the changing threat
  • 17:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

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    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

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