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Gain detailed analysis of the military helicopter market…

With the global helicopter market estimated to be worth $45 billion over the next 10 years, it is vital that you are up-to-date with the technological developments and procurement initiatives in this market. However, many countries seeking to obtain helicopters are unfamiliar with the systems, platforms, technologies and doctrines. SMi are therefore producing their 3rd Annual Military Helicopter conference, taking place at The Hatton in London, on the 28th & 29th January 2002.

This conference will fully explore the entire military helicopter market, ensuring that you are strategically placed to maximise the developments in this area. In particular this conference will provide attendees with information on the latest platform developments and new applications. It will also examine:

  • The advances in guidance and targeting systems
  • Combat search & rescue
  • Armed forces integration & digitisation
  • Simulation advances
  • Case studies on individual programs
  • Modernisation contracts
  • Tactical operations & support
  • Next generation armament

So register now and benefit from the speakers' expert knowledge and the superb networking occasion.

Conference programme

8:30 Registration & Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Paul Beaver

Paul Beaver, Defence Consultant, Ashbourne Beaver Associates

9:10 OPENING ADDRESS

Colonel Nick J Caplin

Colonel Nick J Caplin, Commandant, School of Army Aviation, UK

  • An examination of the traditional role of military helicopters
  • The changing operational roles of military helicopters
  • The factors forcing changes in the aerial arena
  • The case for continuing deployment of helicopters in the 21st Century
  • Trends for future developments
  • 9:40 KEYNOTE ADDRESS

    Brigadier General Dieter Budde

    Brigadier General Dieter Budde, Commander, Germany Army Aviation

  • The future prospects for aerial warfare; technological developments
  • Contributions to domestic security/joint operations/peacetime engagement
  • Where does the future lie? - specific or multi-role
    - multi-role platforms/attack/reconnaissance/maritime
    -transport/special operations
  • Increasing procurement for added operational focus
  • The latest development and initiatives for European countries
  • Operational experience: the Kosovan conflict
  • 10:20 CHALLENGES FACING HELICOPTERS IN THE 21st CENTURY

    Wing Commander (Ret’d) Andrew Brookes

    Wing Commander (Ret’d) Andrew Brookes, Defence Analyst - Air, International Institute for Strategic Studies

  • Lessons from recent operational and humanitarian experience
  • Which assets should be over the modern battlefield?
    - fixed wing
    - rotary wing
    - UAVs
    - cruise missiles
  • Challenges facing those in the helicopter business
  • Concluding thoughts
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 COST EFFECTIVE ROTARY-WING SIMULATION

    Jonathan Butt & Jeremy Howitt

    Jonathan Butt & Jeremy Howitt, Technology Chief & Manager, FST Division, QinetiQ

    12:00 TRAINING SOLUTIONS FOR MODERN MILITARY HELICOPTERS

    Jon Sackett

    Jon Sackett, Marketing Manager, Westland Helicopters

  • Modern day helicopter requirements in varying operational and environmental scenarios - what do training systems offer?
  • Defining end-user requirements, supplying provision of appropriate training at functional & operational level
  • Simulation Based Systems
    Full Mission Simulation (FMS)/low cost procedural trainers
    Desktop Simulators (DTS)/Computer Based Training (CBT)
  • Evolving technical solutions for training systems and exploiting new technology and teaching methodology through industry
  • Technological Applications - application of Commercial Off The Shelf (COTS) computer systems/attraction of COTS based systems - cost effectiveness, fidelity, range
  • Through Life Training, including the Public Private Partnership (PPP) - (WAH-64 Apache, EH101)
  • 12:40 Lunch

    14:00 CONSEQUENCES OF THE NEW GEOSTRATEGIC ENVIRONMENT

    General (Ret’d) Hubert de Laroque-Latour

    General (Ret’d) Hubert de Laroque-Latour, Vice President Governmental Relationship, Eurocopter

    14:40 To be confirmed

    15:00 Afternoon Tea

    15:20 AIRBORNE THREAT WARNING SYSTEMS

    Gottfrid Strindlund

    Gottfrid Strindlund, Director, System Definition, Electronic Warfare Systems Division, Saab Avionics

  • Ground based multi-spectral aiming
  • Ranging and guidance devices
  • Applying current technologies; radar, laser and infra red (IR) guidance and tracking
  • The Helicopter Self-Protection System (HSPS)
    - based on Multi-Sensor Warning System (MSWS)
    - identifying missile threat location and direction
    - active missile jamming and threat destruction
  • Operationally driven requirements based on combat applications
  • Platform integration and system configuration
  • 16:00 EW INTEGRATION AND CONTROL

    Major General (Retd) Ole Fogh

    Major General (Retd) Ole Fogh, Head of Department, Electronic Warfare, TERMA Industries

  • Joint Air Force/Industry development of an EW Management system
  • How to achieve maximum performance of individual EW subsystems
  • Semiautomatic and automatic modes of operation reduce pilot workload, increase effectiveness
  • Threat adaptive response feature ensures the most effective combination of countermeasures against the threat at hand
  • All threat and EW systems information presented on one Tactical Threat Display
  • 3-Dimensional Audio Warning improves pilot's situational awareness, reduces reaction time for evasive manoeuvring
  • 17:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Paul Beaver

    Paul Beaver, Defence Consultant, Ashbourne Beaver Associates

    9:10 OPENING ADDRESS

    Colonel Anthony Fraser

    Colonel Anthony Fraser, Commander Divisional Aviation, HQ Aviation Support Group, Australian Army

  • Australian strategic requirements and roles in line with national defence policy
  • Identifying the missions and operational concepts within the Australian Army?
  • Present Army Aviation structure and capability
  • Defining capability shortfalls within Australian Army Aviation command
  • Current procurement status in light of current policy and deficiencies
  • Platforms that meet the requirements of high survivability, reduced workload for the crew and low possession costs
  • 9:40 AN UPGRADED MI-17 HELICOPTER - PEAK PERFORMANCE TO MEET MODERN BATTLEFIELD CHALLENGES

    Yair Sagie

    Yair Sagie, Director, Helicopter Upgrade Programs, Lahav Division, IAI

  • A review of Israel Aircraft Industries program to fly upgraded Mi-8/17 to new heights of performance
  • Day and night mission system for a multi-role helicopter
  • Glass cockpit configuration design
  • A functional review of the upgraded avionics suite
  • Demonstrations of the upgraded Mi-17 helicopter
  • 10:20 SEARCH AND RESCUE (CSAR) - Canadian Perspective

    Major Christian Lalande

    Major Christian Lalande, Operational Requirements and Training Manager, Canadian Search and Rescue Project, Canadian Department of National Defence

  • Personnel recovery as an increasingly important mission area - policy doctrine
  • Primary operational task of rescue
  • Locate, communicate, recover downed aircrews and isolated personnel
  • Helicopter platform roles in the application of SAR
  • Conflict and peace-time driven operations
  • Additional, non-rescue specific, operational tasks to accomplish primary rescue task
    - training provision
    - operate efficiently during peacetime
    - provide self-protection for rescue assets
    - respond to and prepare for rescue mission execution
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 COMBAT SEARCH & RESCUE (CSAR)

    Barry Thrower

    Barry Thrower, Business Development Manager, H R Smith Group

  • Recent developments in emergency beacon technology
  • Benefits of global, satellite-aided SAR
  • Integration of GPS functionality
    Combat SAR - the issues and choices
    Integrating combat and peacetime SAR functionality
  • SAR-CSAR modular airborne locating and homing system
  • Offering flexibility of deployment and operation
  • Expanding applications and future challenges
  • 12:00 ENHANCING ROTARY SAFETY AND TACTICAL OPERATIONS

    Ian Scaysbrook

    Ian Scaysbrook, Helicopter TERPROM Programme Manager, BAE Systems

  • Threats to military helicopters during tactical operations
  • Helicopter TERPROM® - the safety net
  • Passive database systems - how low can you go?
  • Active systems - pros and cons
  • TERPROM Eagle OWL® - the best of both worlds
    - laser based wire and obstacle warning
    - database ground proximity warning
    - flight trial results
    - enhanced situational awareness
  • 12:40 Lunch

    14:00 DEVELOPING HELICOPTER DIGITISATION

    Lieutenant Colonel (Ret’d) Robert Baynes

    Lieutenant Colonel (Ret’d) Robert Baynes, Defence Adviser - Army, GKN Westland Helicopters

  • A conceptual approach
  • Helicopters as a focus
  • Interaction priorities
  • Information requirements
  • Command and control
  • Co-ordination with ground forces and other airborne platforms
    Information share
  • 14:40 CANADIAN MARITIME HELICOPTER PROJECT (MHP)

    Major Henry Legros

    Major Henry Legros, Maritime Helicopter Project Requirements Desk Officer, Canadian Department of National Defence

  • Operational concepts, objectives and missions
  • What is required of the platform to fulfil these operational concepts in a maritime environment
  • Onboard integrated systems and sensor requirements
  • Costs, operational effectiveness and investment issues
  • Timeframe to operational service
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 SPECIAL ADDRESS

    Colonel Douglas R Isleib

    Colonel Douglas R Isleib, H-1 Program Manager, USMC

  • Supporting Marines on the battlefields of the future
  • Warfighting enhancements achieved with 3rd Gen FLIRs, integrated avionics and cockpits optimized for positive identification of friend or foe, even in urban warfare
  • Interoperable, open architecture, with moving map and mission planning, digital data modem
  • Cost and maintenance advantages through
    - parts commonality
    - savings on manpower and training
    - reduced supply logistics and support
  • Flight performance improvements through drive system and new rotor system
  • AH-1Z payload, range and armament
    UH-1Y speed, payload and range
    Growth opportunity for MMW pod, AIM-9X, modernized HF, laser rockets and SMART pod
  • 16:20 INTEGRATED MISSILE SYSTEMS FOR FUTURE ATTACK HELICOPTERS

    Bob Hamilton

    Bob Hamilton, Director, Business Development, Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control

  • Overview of current operational requirements for integrated missile systems - Army Apache and Marine Corps
  • Super Cobra helicopter applications
  • Hellfire II - short-to-medium range inertially guided missile with infrared (IR) terminal homing
    platform applications/multiple target acquisition and discrimination
    operational range and environments
  • Implementing advanced high-tech, functionally complex electronic systems
    Fire control/vehicle command and control system
  • Enhancing system integration
    Advantages of a total systems approach (Missile Control System MCS)
    Minimising implementation risk
  • Continuous development program - adapting Hellfire in line with the technical evolution of surface warfare (beyond range visual range air to air missile programme)
  • 17:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

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    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    51/53 Hatton Garden
    London EC1N 8HN
    United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

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