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Tracking materials from the warehouse to the warfighter is imperative to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of global logistics systems. This conference will explore how participating nations are implementing RFID and how an increased focus on codification and data management can facilitate a more cohesive structure and interoperability between global logistics operations.

It is equally important to define what the mandated requirements are and to address any problems from the onset on both a technical and management level.

The exceptional speaker line-up includes:
  • Colonel Enrique Porras, Technical Director, IG CIS, Command & Control Systems, Ministry of Defence, Spain*
  • Wing Commander Steven Barbour, Logistics Information Management, Logistics Branch, NATO HQ Supreme Allied Command Transformation
  • Daniela Cirstet, Senior Scientist, Applications Development Branch, Operations Research Division, NATO C3 Agency
  • George Bond, Head, NATO Codification, Technical Enabling Service/Technical Information Group, Ministry of Defence, UK
  • Lieutenant Colonel Jess Rasmussen, Chief of Logistics Branch, Army Operational Command, Danish Defence Command
  • Lieutenant Colonel Marek Dalkowski, Chief, National Codification Bureau, Codification Branch for Military Products, Military Centre for Standardization, Quality Assurance and Codification, Ministry of National Defence, Poland
  • Major Pol Deschuyteneer, Director, Codification Bureau, Belgium Armed Forces
RFID to Codification will:
  • IDENTIFY challenges to effectively deploy the latest tracking technologies
  • DISCUSS RFID technologies, applications and implementations
  • EXAMINE efforts towards increasing interoperability
  • EXPLORE the use of automated identification in fulfil warfighter requirements
  • ANALYSE the role of codification and its importance in asset management

Conference programme

8:30 Registration & Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Dr Duncan McFarlane

Dr Duncan McFarlane, Professor, Service and Support Engineering and Director, Auto ID Laboratory, University of Cambridge

9:10 EMPLOYING AUTOMATED INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES

Wing Commander Steven Barbour

Wing Commander Steven Barbour, Logistics Information Management, Logistics Branch, NATO HQ Supreme Allied Command Transformation

  • International Security Assistance Force case study
  • Maintaining interoperability with national programmes
  • Expeditionary operations - the challenge of managing the NATO operations support chain
  • Turning concept into reality - developing a comprehensive capability package to secure the supply chain of the future and ensure enhanced visibility
  • Current experimentation and initiatives
  • 9:50 INTERIM CONSIGNMENT TRACKING CAPABILITY FOR ISAF

    Daniela Cirstet

    Daniela Cirstet, Senior Scientist, Applications Development Branch, Operations Research Division, NATO C3 Agency

  • Background on the Interim Consignment Tracking Capability (ICTC) project
  • Major achievements up to date
  • Technical challenges
  • Current and planned interoperability
  • Extending the use of RFID
  • 10:30 Morning Coffee

    11:00 RFID APPLICATIONS IN THE MILITARY SUPPLY CHAIN

    Commander Nigel Simmons

    Commander Nigel Simmons, Equipment Capability, Command & Control, Information Infrastructure, Ministry of Defence, UK

  • Using active tags for in-transit visibility
  • Updated status of passive RFID implementation
  • RFID applications for container security and tamper evidence
  • Shelf life management using temperature sensor equipped RFID tags
  • Other potential RFID applications for remote asset monitoring
  • Communications challenges of RFID
  • 11:40 IMPLEMENTING RFID IN THE SUPPLY CHAIN WITH EPCGLOBAL

  • Benefits of EPCglobal standards in the supply chain
  • Taking those benefits back up to your suppliers
  • The particular benefits for military logistics and supply
  • Some thought provoking uses of RFID and standards
  • Adapting RFID for harsh environments
  • Ian Robertson

    Ian Robertson, Director, Global Industry Development, Asia Regional Director, EPCGlobal

    John Seaner

    John Seaner, Vice President, Industry Development, EPCGlobal

    David Lyon

    David Lyon, Business Manager, EPCglobal

    12:20 Networking Lunch

    13:50 CONTRACTOR LOGISTIC SUPPORT AND RFID

    Dr Derek Wright

    Dr Derek Wright, Director, Derek Wright Associates

  • Overview of contract trends within the DLO
  • Implementation, by who, for who and future support with RFID
  • Responsibilities between suppliers and the DLO
  • OEM collaboration: operations and training
  • Investing in the specific application of RFID technology
  • 14:40 MEETING AND IMPLEMENTING RFID TRIALS FOR THE MOD

    Russ Taylor

    Russ Taylor, Accounts Manager, QinetiQ

  • Current programs
  • Monitoring progress
  • Technical challenges
  • Future anticipated growth
  • Extending the use of RFID
  • 15:20 COLLABORATIONS AND REQUIREMENTS IN THE UK DEFENCE COMMUNITY

    Andy Voysey

    Andy Voysey, Secretary, Asset Management Working Group, UKCeB

  • Expanding the use of RFID
  • Building on alliances within the military and industry
  • Implementing and integrating information
  • Improved data management
  • Future growth and prospects
  • 16:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks, followed by Afternoon Tea

    8:30 Registration & Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Bernard Auton

    Bernard Auton, Chairman, Technology Faculty, The Chartered Institute of Logistics and Transport, and Director, Inova Group

    9:10 RFID IMPLEMENTATION – A SPANISH PERSPECTIVE

    Colonel Enrique Porras

    Colonel Enrique Porras, Technical Director, IG CIS, Command & Control Systems, Ministry of Defence, Spain*

  • Creating an active RFID network
  • Interoperability between NATO countries and other allies
  • Technical challenges
  • Future anticipated growth
  • Extending the use of RFID
  • 9:50 NATO CODIFICATION

    George Bond

    George Bond, Head, NATO Codification, Technical Enabling Service/Technical Information Group, Ministry of Defence, UK

  • The NSN as the common language of logistics
  • NSNs as key identifiers for asset management tools and technologies
  • ISO standards for data quality and e-catalogues
  • Electronic open technical dictionary - defence & industry opportunities 
  • 2015 - visions and challenges
  • 10:30 Morning Coffee

    11:00 NATO CODIFICATION IN POLAND

    Colonel Marek Dalkowski

    Colonel Marek Dalkowski, Chief, Codification Branch for Military Products, Military Centre for Standardization, Quality Assurance and Codification, Ministry of National Defence, Poland

  • The role of national codification system within the Ministry of Defence
  • How the NCS affects the national acquisition system (logistic data scope and exchange) and interoperability
  • Data integrity: cooperation with defence industry and military logistic
  • Future developments of systems integration
  • 11:40 OPTIMISING CURRENT CODIFICATION PROCESSES IN BELGIUM

    Major Pol Deschuyteneer

    Major Pol Deschuyteneer, Director, Codification Bureau, Belgian Armed Forces

  • Examining the current situation
  • What can be done to ameliorate the process?
  • Beyond the code: implementing a system for managing data
  • Integrated data management from the perspective of a smaller nation
  • Effects of human factors
  • 12:20 Networking Lunch

    14:00 TRACKING EMERGENCY EQUIPMENT IN THE FRENCH ARMY

    Jean-Philippe Verger

    Jean-Philippe Verger, Director, Tracemed

  • FELIN project: aims and objectives
  • Catastrophe and combat logistics in toxic environments
  • Realising military potential in everyday civilian protection
  • Achieving interoperability through regulation of medical logistics
  • A uniform linguistic code allows joint European operations
  • 14:40 LOGISTICS POLICY AND INFORMATION EXCHANGE

    Lieutenant Colonel Jess Rasmussen

    Lieutenant Colonel Jess Rasmussen, Chief, Logistics Branch, Army Operational Command, Danish Defence Command

  • Effective aggregation of information
  • Experimenting with different systems for optimal results
  • Integrating RFID into existing systems and operations
  • Implementation of new systems and training personnel
  • Benefits of integrating RFID with other tracking technologies
  • 15:20 Chairman’s Closing Remarks, followed by Afternoon Tea

    +

    Workshops

    Pervasive Computing and the Business of War
    Workshop

    Pervasive Computing and the Business of War

    The Hatton, at etc. venues
    2nd February 2007
    London, United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    51/53 Hatton Garden
    London EC1N 8HN
    United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    HOTEL BOOKING FORM

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

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