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Benefits of Attending:
· IDENTIFY the emerging challenges in Air Defence in the 21st Century
· INCLUDES speakers on naval, air, ground based and theatre-wide defence
· DISCOVER the most efficient, cost effective and capable systems
· REVIEW the major operational and research based programmes
· ESTABLISH the latest military thinking on air defence policy
· DEVELOP key contacts through this focused networking forum

A unique opportunity to learn from leading military, government and industry experts including:
· Major General Henry A Obering III, Deputy Director, Missile Defense Agency, Director, Joint National Integration Center and Deputy Director, Force Structure Integration and Deployment, US Department of Defense
· Commander Hans Peter Aksnes, Tactics Development, Inspectorate of GBAD, Ministry of Defence, Norway
· Lieutenant Commander Lars Flemström, RSwN, Head of Air Defence on Ships, FMV
· Captain Roger Easton, Deputy Director, JTAMDO, US Department of Defense
· Captain Jan Møller Nielsen, DeHAWK Manager, TAC, Royal Danish Air Force
· Dr Arthur Hopkins, Director, Technology Department, Defense Threat Reduction Agency
· Jim Lovell, Head of Air Defence Section, NATO HQ
· Colonel (Ret’d) Keith Maxwell, Branch Chief, OAB, Planning and Architecture, NACMA
· Group Captain (Ret’d) David Moss, Defence Analyst, UK Ministry of Defence Air Advisory Board

The Aims & Objectives of the Conference The strategic defence against a foreign military attack is of paramount importance to any country. During the 20th century the concept of strategic defence has been revolutionised by new weapons, especially by intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs) and submarine-launched ballistic missiles (SLBMs) equipped with nuclear warheads and by the development of aircraft. The events of 11 September have caused us to look again at some aspects of air defence. For many years there have been measures in place to detect, deter and, if necessary, destroy aircraft that threatened. However, advances in stealthy and fast moving strategic and tactical weapon systems, as well as strategic and tactical ballistic missiles, operating either individually or in combination, necessitates the development and application of effective guidance and control techniques for advanced air-defence.

Consequently, Air Defence must be considered in a "system-of-systems" context and not viewed in isolation. It must be considered in terms of the threat it is intended to counter, as well as the physical and operational environments in which it is employed. Air Defence solutions are fundamentally driven by the operational environment, technology and funding. Rapid technological advances are fuelling a duel of spiralling sophistication between the threat on the one hand and air defence systems on the other.

This conference will address the current world view on Air Defence, giving a broad and varied perspective by concentrating on developments in the non-western world as well as those in the west. It will demonstrate and divulge the future technologies for air defence in context with the ever-changing operational situational threat for passive, active and counter defence. An advanced AD system must anticipate potential improvements of the air threat in terms of performance and increase of the number of combat application modes. For these purposes an AD system and its main components must have a certain margin of capabilities to guarantee its adaptation to the growing performance of air threat. The greater need for flexibility in collective defence will be explored by discussing the functional integration of maritime air capabilities, extended air defence to include missile defence, enlargement and Peace Support Operations/Crisis Response Operations.

“A perfect conference event to update knowledge and participate in new trends and developments”
Previous SMi delegate: Peter Bertschinger, Marketing Manager, Oerlikon Contraves AG

Conference programme

8:30 Registration and Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Jim O’Halloran

Jim O’Halloran, Managing Director, Research Analyst Defence (RAD)

9:10 NMD AND THE RESPONSE TO A NEW THREAT

Major General Henry A Obering III

Major General Henry A Obering III, Deputy Director / Director / Deputy Director, Missile Defense Agency / Joint National Integration Center / Force Structure Integration and Deployment, US Department of Defense

  • Testing and development: the work of the JNIC
  • Developing Battle Management and C3 capabilities
  • The Space Tracking & Surveillance System (STSS)
  • Boost phase interception: - the airborne laser - kinetic energy warheads - space based laser research
  • Mid-course defense: - ground based - sea based
  • Terminal defense: the ‘Catcher’s Mitt’
    Probable timetables for effective NMD deployment
  • 9:40 ADDRESSING THE FUTURE WMD THREAT

    Dr Arthur Hopkins

    Dr Arthur Hopkins, Director, Technology Department, Defense Threat Reduction Agency

  • The rapidly developing threat
  • Countering the first-strike scenario
  • Passive control: - threat control - threat reduction
  • The high-tech solution
  • The future
  • 10:20 GROUND BASED AIR DEFENCE UPDATE

    Eddie Hillier

    Eddie Hillier, New Business Manager, Future Concepts, MBDA

  • Current UK position
  • European overview
  • The changing threat
  • Benefiting from technology
  • Future directions
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 AIR COMMAND AND CONTROL SYSTEMS

    Colonel (Ret’d) Keith Maxwell

    Colonel (Ret’d) Keith Maxwell, Chief, RAB, Planning and Architecture Division, NACMA

  • Requirement for ACCS
  • Programme overview
  • Functionality
  • Architecture
  • Programme schedule and progress
    Future upgrades
  • Benefits from ACCS
  • 12:00 THE TACTICS OF GBAD

    Major Oerjan Pettersen

    Major Oerjan Pettersen, Tactics Development, Inspectorate of GBAD, Ministry of Defence, Norway

  • Norwegian GBAD systems
  • The present GBAD training programme
  • Fundamentals of effective GBAD - deployment - integration/synchronisation
  • Maintaining air defence in harsh environments
  • Altering tactics to meet new threats and new equipment developments
  • 12:40 Networking Lunch

    14:00 AIR DEFENCE POLICY AND THEATRE AIRSPACE

    Lieutenant Colonel Maclane

    Lieutenant Colonel Maclane, NORAD, National Defense Canada

  • Strategic objectives
  • Threats and the vulnerability of the American continent
  • Co-operation between allies: - NORAD - NATO
  • A “moving Theater”; establishing Airspace abroad
  • Priorities for the future
  • 14:40 MISSILE DEFENCE UPGRADES

    Captain Jan Møller Nielsen

    Captain Jan Møller Nielsen, DeHAWK Manager, TAC, Royal Danish Air Force

  • Danish GBAD: an overview
  • The operational capability of DeHAWK
  • The layered defence principle: Stinger
  • The future expandability of DeHAWK
  • Cross-platform improvements
  • 15:20 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Jim O’Halloran

    Jim O’Halloran, Managing Director, Research Analyst Defence (RAD)

    9:10 AIR POWER AND ASYMMETRY

    Air Commodore Andrew Lambert

    Air Commodore Andrew Lambert, Title to be confirmed, US Air Force

  • The increasing capabilities of air defence systems
  • The asymmetrical response to air power: - terrorism - kamikaze attacks - special operations
  • Expectations of effectiveness of air attack in the face of defensive improvements
  • Countering improved defensive capabilities: - SEAD - speed - stealth
  • 9:40 EXPANDING AIR DEFENCE COOPERATION

    Group Captain (Ret’d) David Moss

    Group Captain (Ret’d) David Moss, Defence Analyst, DMM Solutions

  • Present military capabilities
  • Air defence and doctrinal contrast: East vs West
  • The convergence of East and West
  • The challenges of NATO membership
  • Outside NATO: East European export opportunities
  • 10:20 NATIONAL MISSILE DEFENCE

    Captain Roger Easton

    Captain Roger Easton, Deputy Director, Joint Theater Air and Missile Defense Organisation

  • NMD programme history
  • The THAAD programme: - MEADS - PAC-3 Patriot - Arrow
  • Principles of TBM elimination
  • Deploying NMD outside the United States
  • Prospective improvements
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 EXTENDED PRESENTATION - AIR DEFENCE UPDATE

  • Air defence today
  • Mission analysis
  • Protecting high value assets
  • Requirement and solutions for battlefield air defence
  • System integration and battle management
  • Practical examples
  • Peter Bertschinger

    Peter Bertschinger, Marketing Manager, Oerlikon Contraves

    Peter Blumer

    Peter Blumer, Sales Director, Oerlikon Contraves

    12:40 Networking Lunch

    14:00 ADVANCED AIR DEFENCE SYSTEMS

    Jerome Maffert

    Jerome Maffert, Business Development, Extended Air Defence, MBDA

  • Genesis of the Aster SAM system
  • A family of missile systems: - SAM - SAMP/T - PAAMS
  • A fundamental advance over legacy systems: - active terminal guidance - the ‘Pif-Paf’ control system - multiple target engagement
  • Integrating and deploying Aster: - the Horizon frigate - Type 45/Daring class - SAMP/T in Franco-Italian service
  • 14:40 EXECUTIVE BRIEFING

  • - Welcome and introduction - SEAROADS simulation
  • Johan Peekstok

    Johan Peekstok, Director, TNO Physics and Electronics Laboratory
    View Bio

    Remco Witberg

    Remco Witberg, SEAROADS Program Manager, TNO – Physics and Electronics Laboratory

    16:40 Afternoon Tea

    17:00 Applications of computer modelling

    18:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

    +

    Workshops

    Modelling Air Defence Systems and the Naval Battlespace
    Workshop

    Modelling Air Defence Systems and the Naval Battlespace

    The Hatton, at etc. venues
    16th January 2004
    London, United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    51/53 Hatton Garden
    London EC1N 8HN
    United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    HOTEL BOOKING FORM

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

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