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Since the dawn of time enterprises and organisations have been managing their supply chains. Now, with the advent of new technology, the possibilities exist to apply the key advantage enjoyed by small traders to larger organisations - namely the fact that an efficient small trader knows everything about their business, all of the time.

This year's conference aims to outline the benefits of modern day supply chain management practices to the defence supply chain through country specific analysis. The event will also break down the defence supply chain into its clearly defined components and assess their individual role within the chain and also how they function as part of the entire process.

The conference will provide a unique opportunity to listen to presentations from military organisations that are currently in the process of major supply chain initiatives. Presentations will also concentrate on the key enabler of the supply chain, e-business. This event will off both speakers and delegates the chance to learn from the key personnel in the defence supply chain arena, through detailed presentations and relaxed networking opportunities.

Benefits of Attending:

  • REVIEW country specific supply chain management policy and doctrine
  • MAXIMISE supply chain efficiency and cost effectiveness
  • GAIN a valuable insight into the latest defence supply chain initiatives
  • ASSESS the benefits of implementing e-business throughout your organisation
  • EXPLORE the future trends and developments in the supply chain arena
  • DEVELOP key contacts through focused networking forums


A unique opportunity to learn from leading industry experts including:
  • Major General Malcolm Wood CBE, Director General Defence Supply Chain, DLO, Ministry of Defence, UK
  • Vice Admiral Keith Lippert, Director, Defense Logistics Agency
  • Rear Admiral Linda Bird, Commanding Officer Defense Supply Center Columbus, Defense Logistics Agency
  • Group Captain Bill Mahon, Director Plans, Defence Storage and Distribution Agency, Ministry of Defence, UK
  • Group Captain Jerry Knights, Branch Chief Logistics, International Military Staff, NATO
  • Colonel Robert M. Douglas, Chief, Supply Management Division, Headquarters Air Force Materiel Command, USAF
  • Lieutenant Colonel Torben Moeller, Chief Logistics Branch, Defence Command, Denmark
  • Major Michael Malm, Project Manager, Command and Control Division, Swedish Defence Research Agency
  • Brigadier (Ret'd) Frank Steer MBE, Director General, Institute of Quality Assurance, Former Director of Army Equipment Support, DLO, Ministry of Defence, UK
  • Simon Lydiard, Assistant Director, Procurement Policy, DLO, Ministry of Defence, UK
  • Arthur Fisher, FDSCi Team Leader, DLO, Ministry of Defence, UK
  • Martin Andreae, Head of International Logistics, Defence Material Administration, Joint Material Command, FMV
  • Peter Priddle, Director SDSS Upgrade Project, Materiel Information Systems Division, Department of Defence, Australia
  • Jack Cruickshank, Team Leader - Optimisation, Material Acquisition and Support Optimisation Project, Canadian Department of National Defence
  • Terri Rose, Program Manager, Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Conference programme

8:30 Registration & Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Dr Derek Wright

Dr Derek Wright, Visiting Professor, Acquisition and Logistics Unit, Department of Defence Management Security Analysis, Cranfield University, Royal Military College of Science

9:10 SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT WITHIN THE DLO

Major General Malcolm Wood CBE

Major General Malcolm Wood CBE, Director General Defence Supply Chain, DLO, Ministry of Defence, UK

  • The importance of an efficient supply chain to modern day warfare
  • An overview of the supply chain operations centre’s role within UK military support
  • Current supply chain management strategy and structure
  • Limitations of present system
  • Finding the appropriate strategic partners for co-operation on the defence supply chain
  • Future developments in defence supply chain priorities and practices
  • 9:50 KEYNOTE ADDRESS

    Vice Admiral Keith Lippert

    Vice Admiral Keith Lippert, Director, Defense Logistics Agency

  • How we face the changing customer
  • Reducing our costs
  • Improving our performance
  • ERP and one enterprise agency alignment
  • 10:30 IMPLEMENTING SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT PRACTICES

    Rear Admiral Linda Bird

    Rear Admiral Linda Bird, Commanding Officer Defense Supply Center Columbus, Defense Logistics Agency

  • The DLA’s role in facilitating DoD supply chain management practice
  • An assessment of current actions and initiatives at the DLA
  • Present end-to-end distribution capabilities required to meet 21st Century deployment and sustainability requirements
  • The implementation of e-business systems within the DLA supply chain
  • Future developments in DLA policy regarding inventory control, material management and supply distribution
  • Future structure and priorites of the DLA
  • 11:10 Morning Coffee

    11:30 A NATO PERSPECTIVE ON SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT

    Group Captain Jerry Knights

    Group Captain Jerry Knights, Branch Chief Logistics, International Military Staff, NATO

  • Supply chain management as an enabler to NATO operations
  • The development of co-operation in multinational logistics
  • Changes in the supply chain through phases of an operation
  • Increasing efficiency within NATO’s support system
  • Future developments in the NATO supply chain
  • NATO asset tracking
  • 12:10 PROCUREMENT WITHIN THE AUSTRALIAN DEFENCE MATERIAL ORGANISATION

    Peter Priddle

    Peter Priddle, Director SDSS Upgrade Project, Materiel Information Systems Division, Department of Defence, Australia

  • The need for a single tri service procurement supply chain
  • Upgrading the current MIMS enterprise resource planning standard defence supply system
  • The problems with replacing the present electronic purchasing unit
  • The structure of the future system
  • Advantages to military and industry
  • 12:50 Networking Lunch

    14:00 OPTIMISING THE DEFENCE SUPPLY CHAIN

    Jack Cruickshank

    Jack Cruickshank, Team Leader - Optimisation, Material Acquisition and Support Optimisation Project, Canadian Department of National Defence

  • An overview of the Materiel Acquisition and Support Optimisation Project (MASOP).
  • Achieving integrated, cost effective and efficient supply chain processes for the Canadian Forces.
  • Fostering a culture of continuous improvement across the supply chain.
  • Engaging the private sector in the strategic management of key resources.
  • 14:40 OPTIMISING INVENTORY LEVELS THROUGHOUT THE ENTIRE DEFENCE SUPPLY CHAIN

    Lieutenant Colonel Torben Moeller

    Lieutenant Colonel Torben Moeller, Chief Logistics Branch, Defence Command, Denmark

  • Overview of the new system that is currently in the process of implementation
  • Problems with integrating the system into the Danish Forces
  • The effect of the new system on the planning ability of the Danish Forces, are response times increased significantly?
  • Future developments in the drive to optimise the Danish defence supply chain
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 NATO CODIFICATION

    George Bond

    George Bond, Head of Business Management, UK National Codification Bureau, Ministry of Defence, UK

  • Codification – 50 years of experience
  • Interoperability for the global warfighter
  • Data dictionaries and international standards in e-commerce
  • Codification for commercial support to the supply chain
  • 16:20 ACHIEVING A LEANER SUPPLY CHAIN

    Siem Van Merrienboer

    Siem Van Merrienboer, Program Manager Logistics, TNO Physics and Electronics Laboratory

  • The need to improve efficiency and move towards a leaner supply chain
  • Current thrusts within the Dutch Armed Forces towards a lean supply chain
  • Does increasing efficiency and cutting costs have a negative effect on the flexibility and adaptability of the defence supply chain?
  • Identifying inefficient areas within the supply chain
  • Methods of removing the “waste” from the defence supply chain
  • The future for the Dutch Armed Forces supply chain
  • 17:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-registration & Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Barry Brookes

    Barry Brookes, , Independent Consultant

    9:10 OPTIMIZATION OF THE US AIR FORCE SUPPLY CHAIN

    Colonel Robert M. Douglas

    Colonel Robert M. Douglas, Chief, Supply Management Division, Headquarters Air Force Materiel Command, USAF

  • Background on measuring and funding the AF supply chain
  • Benefits of the Aircraft Availability Model (AAM)
  • Supply chain constraints
  • Supply chain goals and metrics
  • Other supply chain initiatives
  • The way ahead
  • 9:40 A MILITARY PERSPECTIVE ON THE FUTURE DEFENCE SUPPLY CHAIN INITIATIVE

    Arthur Fisher

    Arthur Fisher, FDSCi Team Leader, DLO, Ministry of Defence, UK

  • The need for the FDSCi
  • Overview of current FDSCi strategy
  • Benefits to military
  • Benefits to industry
  • Future projects that will benefit from the FDSCi
  • Areas of development within the FDSCi
  • 10:20 A MODEL FOR DELIVERING LEAN LOGISTICS

    Phil Tozer

    Phil Tozer, MoD Commercial Manager FDSCi, DLO, Ministry of Defence, UK

  • The business drivers for supply chain optimisation
  • Components of a lean logistics model: · integrated supply and engineering data through the application of open, neutral international standards · complex business process automation through the application of workflow techniques · delivering the right information, to the right person, in the right format, at the right time within a Collaborative Working Environment (CWE) that spans the extended business enterprise
  • Value added services that can be deployed across the CWE to address supply chain inefficiencies
  • Coherent performance measurement to identify supply chain improvements
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS IN SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT

    Group Captain Bill Mahon

    Group Captain Bill Mahon, Director Plans, Defence Storage and Distribution Agency, Ministry of Defence, UK

  • Current developments in supply chain management from a viewpoint of distribution
  • The need to reduce costs and increase efficiency
  • Working with other MoD organisations and industry to achieve these goals
  • Benefits of working with industry and the advantages to the defence supply chain in terms of distribution
  • The future structure and priorities of the DSDA
  • 12:00 TOTAL ASSET VISIBILITY

    Simon Rose

    Simon Rose, Program Manager, Oak Ridge National Laboratory

  • The need for tracking items within the supply chain
  • Advantages of RFI technology
  • The success of RFI during the recent exercises and campaigns
  • Enhancing the military’s ability to locate and redirect supply shipments
  • RFI’s role within current e-technology
  • Future advancements and developments
  • 12:40 Networking Lunch

    14:00 SWARM TECHNOLOGY IN DEFENCE LOGISTICS

  • How do insect societies manage to perform difficult tasks, in dynamic and varied environments, without any external guidance or control, and without any central co-ordination?
  • How can a large number of entities with only partial information about their environment solve problems?
  • How do you create a supply chain that is able to defend itself against, or resolve from, shocks, and is able to create and exploit opportunities
  • Some examples of applied swarm technology today
  • Is swarm intelligence and networks the next generation supply chain?
  • Major Michael Malm

    Major Michael Malm, Project Manager, Command and Control Division, Swedish Defence Research Agency

    Martin Andreae

    Martin Andreae, Head of International Logistics, Defence Material Administration, Joint Material Command, FMV

    14:40 PRODUCT LIFE CYCLE SUPPORT

    Malcolm Baca

    Malcolm Baca, President, Chief Executive Officer, QinetiQ Technology Extension Corporation

  • Simplifying obsolescence information services to be as user friendly as the Internet
  • Less platform-centric and more network-centric on supply chain common problems
  • The next generation of obsolescence management tools
  • Specific information access for all specialty areas of supply chain management responsibility
  • Mitigating supply chain component availability problems through early warning of discontinuance notification
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    16:00 B2G SOLUTIONS WITHIN THE DEFENCE SUPPLY CHAIN

    Roger West

    Roger West, Supply Chain Consultant, Cap Gemini Ernst & Young

  • An overview of the current b2g solutions that are being implemented
  • An analysis of the current thrusts to improve the b2g solutions in use
  • Streamlining your defence supply chain through b2g solutions
  • Advantages of the Network Valued Chain to the defence industry’s supply chain
  • Future developments in the implementation and integration of b2g solutions
  • 16:20 COLLABORATIVE COMMERCE

    Gary Toyne

    Gary Toyne, Aerospace and Defence Director, EDS

  • Collaboration overview
  • Suggested approach
  • Options to consider
  • Case studies
  • 17:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

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    Workshops

    Supply Chain Relationships In Action
    Workshop

    Supply Chain Relationships In Action

    The Hatton, at etc. venues
    30th January 2004
    London, United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    51/53 Hatton Garden
    London EC1N 8HN
    United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    HOTEL BOOKING FORM

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

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    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

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    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

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