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Military involvement in urban conflicts and peacekeeping missions has escalated significantly. Recent encounters have illustrated the development of urban warfare into guerrilla style unconventional strategies against modern well equipped forces. With an increasing number of enemy forces using civilian populations as a form of defence against traditional attack, it seems likely that the wars of the 21st century will be won or lost in the Urban Environment. The need to understand and train military forces for such conflicts is now more important than ever.

Urban Warfare 2004 will address military doctrine, requirements and the challenges of military operations in the urban environment. It will also look at training, deployment, and modernisation issues.

Using the skills, knowledge and experience of our guest speakers, this Conference will examine how tactics, procedures, techniques and technologies need to be developed and evaluated for implementation in the urban landscape. The Conference will analyse case studies on lessons learned whilst assessing how these should be applied in present-day and future conflict situations. A unique opportunity to hear from the leading experts in the field including:

  • Brigadier General Peter Everson OBE, Chief Executive, Defence Intelligence and Security Centre, Ministry of Defence UK
  • Colonel Bob Toguchi, Director, Strategic Plans, US Army TRADOC
  • Colonel (USMC Ret'd) Randolph Gangle, Executive Director, Center for Emerging Threats and Opportunities, US Marine Corps Warfighting Laboratory
  • Colonel (USMC Ret'd) George Fenton, Director, Homeland Security Programs, American Systems Corporation
  • Lieutenant Colonel Pete Rafferty MBE, SO1 Dismounted Close Combat, Directorate Equipment Capability (Ground Manoeuvre), Ministry of Defence UK
  • Lieutenant Colonel Crispian Beattie, SO1 Concepts and Doctrine, Directorate of General Development & Doctrine, Ministry of Defence UK
  • Major John Simeoni, OIC Project Metropolis, Marine Corps Warfighting Laboratory
  • Dr Alice Hills, Senior Lecturer, JSCSC
  • Jan Vermeulen, Program Manager, C3I Systems, Directorate of Materiel, Royal Netherlands Army, and Chairman, UCATT (Urban Combat Advanced Training Technology) NATO Working Group
  • Chuck Menges, Deputy Director, Doctrine Division, MOUT, US Marine Corps
  • George Mordica, Senior Military Analyst, Center for Army Lessons Learned, US Army


  • Benefits of attending:

  • MAXIMISE your understanding of urban operational requirements
  • IDENTIFY the key elements of UO concepts and doctrine
  • BROADEN your knowledge of country-specific urban combat practice
  • ASSESS the experiences and lessons learned in Iraq
  • DEVELOP key contacts through this focused networking forum
  • Conference programme

    8:30 Registration & Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Major General (Ret’d) John Russell-Jones

    Major General (Ret’d) John Russell-Jones, Army Adviser, BAE SYSTEMS

    9:10 URBAN WARFARE - NATO INITIATIVES

    Jan Vermeulen

    Jan Vermeulen, Programme Manager C3I Systems, Royal Netherlands Army Material Command

  • Background to urban training site in NATO
  • current initiatives
  • challenges faced
  • NATO approach to FIBUA and MOUT
  • organisation elements
  • 9:40 CHALLENGES IN URBAN OPERATIONS

    Colonel (USMC Ret’d) Randolph Gangle

    Colonel (USMC Ret’d) Randolph Gangle, Executive Director, Centre for Emerging Threats and Opportunities (CETO), US Marine Corps Warfighting Lab

  • Understanding/analysing the urban battlespace
  • Changing nature of the urban opponent
  • Primacy of the Combined Arms Team
  • Areas of critical deficiency
  • intelligence
  • facilities
  • training
  • doctrine
  • operational level
  • simultaneous operations
  • equipment
  • Role of aviation in urban warfare
  • 10:20 INTELLIGENCE, SURVEILLANCE AND RECONNAISSANCE (ISR)

    Brigadier Peter Everson OBE

    Brigadier Peter Everson OBE, Chief Executive, Defence Intelligence & Security Centre

  • Intelligence Preparation of the Battlefield (IPB)
  • Maximising ISR capability
  • ISR challenges in an urban context
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 SITUATIONAL AWARENESS IN URBAN OPERATIONS

    Lieutenant Colonel Pete Rafferty MBE

    Lieutenant Colonel Pete Rafferty MBE, SO1 Dismounted Close Combat, Directorate Equipment Capability (Ground Manoeuvre), Ministry of Defence UK

  • Aspects of situational awareness
  • command, control and communication
  • identification
  • localisation
  • Provision of necessary equipment
  • Current shortfalls
  • Technological improvements to date
  • Requirements and considerations for the future
  • 12:00 BRITISH ARMY URBAN OPERATIONS (UO) CONCEPTS FOR THE TIMEFRAME 2010-2020

    Lieutenant Colonel Crispian Beattie

    Lieutenant Colonel Crispian Beattie, SO1 Concepts and Doctrine (Land), Directorate General Development & Doctrine, Ministry of Defence UK

  • UO background and context
  • Future operating environment
  • Joint Effects Based Operations in urban terrain
  • The need for agility
  • Meeting logistic demands in UO
  • Benefits of Network Enabled Capability
  • Implications for the lines of development
  • concepts and doctrine
  • people
  • equipment and technology
  • training development
  • structures and estates
  • sustainability
  • Summary and conclusion
  • 12:40 Networking Lunch

    14:00 THE ROLE OF HELICOPTERS IN SUPPORT OF DEPLOYED FORCES ON URBAN TERRAIN

    Lieutenant Colonel Julian McDonnell

    Lieutenant Colonel Julian McDonnell, SO1 Concepts and Doctrine, Army Aviation, , British Army

  • Fire support
  • Reconnaissance and surveillance
  • Targeting and manoeuvre
  • Troop movement
  • Rescue
  • Advantages / disadvantages
  • Operational experiences
  • 14:40 URBAN OPERATIONS IN ISRAEL

    A Senior Representative from the Israeli Defence Forces

    A Senior Representative from the Israeli Defence Forces, ,

  • Characteristics of urban warfare specific to Israel
  • The Israeli approach to developing combat doctrine
  • Strategy and tactics
  • Recent experiences
  • Lessons learned
  • Looking to the future
  • 15:20 UGV’S, UAV’S AND REMOTE SENSORS

  • The roles of unmanned applications
  • UAV, UGV and MAV capability
  • Comparison between types
  • System of systems approach
  • Current projects
  • Developments for the future
  • Paul Evans

    Paul Evans, Project Manager, Tactical UAVs & Principal Engineer, QinetiQ

    Bill Nelson

    Bill Nelson, Business Development , Qinetiq

    16:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-registration & Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Professor Richard Ogorkiewicz

    Professor Richard Ogorkiewicz, Visiting Professor, Royal Military College of Science

    9:10 URBAN WARFARE – DOCTRINE AND CHARACTERISTICS

    Lieutenant Colonel Lloyd Brown

    Lieutenant Colonel Lloyd Brown, Urban Ops POC / Action Officer, US Army TRADOC – JADD

  • Characteristics of major urban operations “Joint"
  • Urban environment
  • Visualisation of the urban battlespace
  • Full spectrum combat operations
  • Capabilities and/ Leader Development
  • experimentation
  • training systems
  • future leader training
  • The way ahead
  • 9:40 TRAINING FOR URBAN COMBAT

    Colonel Bob Toguchi

    Colonel Bob Toguchi, Director, Strategic Plans, US Army TRADOC

  • Leadership development
  • Minimum desirable skills
  • movement
  • use of weapons
  • flexibility and spontaneity
  • Training programmes
  • Facilities and equipment
  • Simulation
  • 10:20 TACTICAL DOCTRINE

    Chuck Menges

    Chuck Menges, Deputy Director, Doctrine Division, MOUT, US Marine Corps

  • Fundamental tactics – defender and attacker
  • Use of armour
  • fire support
  • mortars
  • artillery
  • role of the airforce
  • Combat support
  • Communications, command and control, decision-making, speed of kill, lethality and survivability
  • Counter tactics
  • urban combat
  • guerilla warfare / terrorism tactics
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 PANEL DISCUSSION

    Led by Dave Dilegge

    Led by Dave Dilegge, Senior Urban Operations Analyst, US Marine Corps

    12:00 LESSONS LEARNED

    George J. Mordica II

    George J. Mordica II, Senior Military Analyst, Center for Army Lessons Learned, US Army

  • Pre-conflict preparation
  • geographical considerations
  • topology of networks
  • human organisation
  • human characteristics
  • Difficulties expected and encountered
  • Operation-specific requirements and tactics
  • Success and failure of urban operations
  • The learning curve of Operation Iraqi Freedom
  • Analysis for the future
  • 12:40 Lunch

    13:40 EXPERIENCES AND REFLECTIONS

    A Senior Representative from Operation Telic

    A Senior Representative from Operation Telic, ,

  • Background and overview of what happened
  • manpower advantages
  • technical superiority
  • inappropriate force compliment
  • urban defence
  • Urban defence force capability
  • techniques
  • recognising vulnerabilities
  • Using hindsight, ways in which mistakes could have been avoided
  • Current knowledge to enable a different approach and a successful mission
  • 14:00 HUMAN FACTORS

    Dr Alice Hills

    Dr Alice Hills, Senior Lecturer, JSCSC

  • Human architecture
  • Effective human involvement and performance
  • Psyops
  • Civil affairs operations
  • Humanitarian issues – post-conflict support
  • Psychological issues
  • stress
  • moral dilemmas
  • 14:40 THE EMPLOYMENT OF HEAVY AND LIGHT ARMOUR IN URBAN OPERATIONS

    Major Mark Rynehart

    Major Mark Rynehart, SO2 Manoeuvre, Force Development Branch, Directorate of the Royal Armoured Corps

  • Current doctrinal context
  • Recent operational experiences
  • Potential tank upgrades, especially firepower requirements
  • Conceptual influences
  • Role of Future Rapid Effect System Direct Fire platform
  • 15:20 NON-LETHAL CAPABILITIES IN THE URBAN ENVIRONMENT

    Colonel (USMC Ret’d) George Fenton

    Colonel (USMC Ret’d) George Fenton, Director, Homeland Security Programs, Army Systems Corporation

  • Augmenting, not replacing, traditional means of deadly force
  • Advantages of NLW
  • incapacitation of personnel or material
  • weapons that do not cross the death barrier
  • relative reversible effects on targets
  • discrimination
  • Current projects
  • Future NLW establishment in military doctrine
  • 16:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

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    Workshops

    The Critical Issues of Urban Operations
    Workshop

    The Critical Issues of Urban Operations

    The Hatton, at etc. venues
    20th January 2004
    London, United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    51/53 Hatton Garden
    London EC1N 8HN
    United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    HOTEL BOOKING FORM

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