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Recent conflicts have illustrated that for the foreseeable future urban operations are, and will remain, both asymmetric and irregular in nature. Urban terrain, offering greater opportunity for defence and cover, looks likely to be the arena for the battles of the 21st century. Military involvement in urban conflict and peacekeeping missions has escalated significantly in recent years, leading to a greater focus on operational capability in built up areas.

Urban Operations - The Three Block War will provide a forum for discussion between the world's leading military powers on matters of policy, doctrine, training and technologies pertaining to the enhancement of performance in urban operations. Military, academic and NGO representatives will present and discuss the key issues in the forefront of the urban warfare debate, with a view to both improving force effectiveness in future operations and minimising the impact upon the civilian population.

Gain an insight from leading experts in the field including:

  • Colonel Nick Ashmore, Deputy Director, Army Resources and Plans, Ministry of Defence, UK and former Commander 3rd Royal Horse Artillery, British Army
  • Colonel Duncan Barley, Assistant Director, Land Warfare (Doctrine), Directorate General Doctrine and Development, Ministry of Defence, UK
  • Colonel P Mason Carpenter, NATO Liaison Officer, NATO Military Committee, US Department of Defense
  • Colonel Peter Rzeczewski, Branch Leader, Army Development Division, GE TRADOC, German Army
  • Colonel Silas Suchanek, IPT Leader, Defence Clothing, Defence Logistics Organisation, Ministry of Defence, UK*
  • Lieutenant Colonel Steve Russell, Chief of Tactics, US Army Infantry School
  • Lieutenant Colonel Paul Mitchell, SO1 Doctrine, Land Ops, Directorate General Doctrine and Development, Ministry of Defence, UK
  • Lieutenant Colonel Mike Cuccio, Assistant Chief, Multinational Operations Division, The Joint Staff, US Department of Defense
  • Lieutenant Colonel Julian McDonnell, SO1 Concepts and Doctrine, Army Aviation, British Army
  • Major Simon Bernard, G3, 5 Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group, Canadian Armed Forces
  • Major Tim Hutchison, Officer Commanding, Urban Operations Wing, Land Warfare Centre, Ministry of Defence, UK
  • Major Frederik Almér, Development Officer FIBUA/MOUT, Development Section, Swedish Armed Forces
  • William Suttie, dstl, Ministry of Defence, UK and International Chairman, Combat Identification Technical Working Group
  • Peter Caddick-Adams, Military Historian, Cranfield University
  • Emma Sparks, Lecturer, Engineering Systems Department, Cranfield University
  • Louis Maresca, Legal Advisor, Legal Division, International Committee of the Red Cross

Benefits of Attending include:

  • CONSIDER various country perspectives, addressing military doctrine, requirements, and the challenges of military operations in the urban environment
  • ANALYSE training, deployment, modernisation and transformation issues
  • EVALUATE how tactics, procedures, techniques, and technologies are to be developed and evaluated for implementation in the urban landscape
  • REFLECT on lessons learned whilst assessing how these should be applied in present-day and future operations
  • EXPLORE advanced concepts to develop new tactics, techniques, and procedures to refine force structure requirements and train forces to adapt to the changing requirements of the 21st Century battlefield

Conference programme

8:30 Registration & Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Peter Caddick-Adams

Peter Caddick-Adams, Lecturer, Cranfield University

9:10 THE UNIQUE CHALLENGE OF URBAN OPERATIONS

Colonel Nick Ashmore

Colonel Nick Ashmore, Deputy Director, Army Resources and Plans, Ministry of Defence, UK

9:50 URBAN WARFARE - THE BRITISH ARMY VIEW

Colonel Duncan Barley

Colonel Duncan Barley, Assistant Director Land Warfare (Doctrine), Directorate General Doctrine and Development , Ministry of Defence, UK

10:30 Morning Coffee

11:00 A GERMAN PERSPECTIVE

Colonel Peter Rzeczewski

Colonel Peter Rzeczewski, Branch Leader, Army Development, GE TRADOC, German Army

11:40 OPERATION IRAQI FREEDOM

Lieutenant Colonel Steve Russell

Lieutenant Colonel Steve Russell, Chief of Tactics, US Army Infantry School

  • Who are we fighting?
  • How can the enemy hurt us?
  • How can we hurt him?
  • Tactical innovations
  • Developing Human Intelligence
  • 12:20 Networking Lunch

    13:50 THE VIEW FROM SWEDEN

    Major Frederik Almér

    Major Frederik Almér, Development Officer FIBUA/MOUT Development Section , Swedish Armed Forces

  • Swedish specific issues
  • Swedish doctrine for fighting in urban areas
  • Development of special units for urban operations
  • Concept of training for 3-block war
  • Technical advancements for urban operations
  • 14:30 MULTINATIONAL INTEROPERABILITY

    Lieutenant Colonel Mike Cuccio

    Lieutenant Colonel Mike Cuccio, Assistant Chief, Multinational Operations Division, US Department of Defense

  • Multinational Interoperability Council (MIC)
  • Coalition operating environment
  • Multinational Information Sharing (MNIS)
  • MIC Griffin domain
  • Interoperability beyond the networks
  • 15:10 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 THE EFFECTS BASED APPROACH IN URBAN CONFLICT

    Colonel P. Mason Carpenter

    Colonel P. Mason Carpenter, NATO Liason Officer, NATO Military Committee, US Department of Defense

  • The urban environment
  • Effects-based planning in the urban environment
  • Collateral damage concerns
  • Weapon selection considerations
  • Responsiveness
  • 16:20 HELICOPTERS IN URBAN OPERATIONS

    Lieutenant Colonel Julian McDonnell

    Lieutenant Colonel Julian McDonnell, SO1 Concepts and Doctrine, Army Aviation, British Army

  • Roles of battlefield helicopters
  • Tactical tasks and doctrine
  • fire support
  • reconnaissance and surveillance
  • targeting and manoeuvre
  • troop movement
  • Lessons from operations
  • Future developments
  • 17:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Registration & Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Peter Caddick-Adams

    Peter Caddick-Adams, Lecturer, Cranfield University

    9:10 KEEPING ORDER, POST TELIC

  • An overview of the Op TELIC 2+ analysis project
  • Synopsis of the key themes in the post Major Conflict phase
  • Emerging high level insights
  • What are the implications for doctrine and training?
  • Lieutenant Colonel Paul Mitchell

    Lieutenant Colonel Paul Mitchell, SO1 Doctrine, Land Ops, DGDD, Ministry Of Defence (M O D)

    Lieutenant Colonel Jim Storr

    Lieutenant Colonel Jim Storr, SO1 NI Study , DGD&D MoD

    9:50 CANADIAN EXPERIENCE IN AFGHANISTAN

    Major Simon Bernard

    Major Simon Bernard, G3, 5 Mechanized Brigade Group, Canadian Army

  • The urban environment
  • Urban Ops Lessons learned - OP ATHENA (International Security Assistance Force – Afghanistan)
  • Training
  • Challenges
  • The way ahead
  • 10:30 Morning Coffee

    11:00 URBAN OPERATIONS AND THE LAW OF WAR

    Louis Maresca

    Louis Maresca, Legal Advisor, Legal Division, International Committee of the Red Cross

  • Restrictions on the conduct of operations
  • Restrictions on weapons
  • Precautions
  • Rules on the environment
  • 11:40 BODY ARMOUR IN THE URBAN ENVIRONMENT

    Colonel Silas Suchanek

    Colonel Silas Suchanek, IPT Leader, Defence Clothing IPT, DLO, Ministry of Defence, UK

  • The requirement for personal protection
  • Operational and technical constraints
  • Potential and prototype solutions
  • In-service equipment
  • Likely future developments
  • 12:20 Networking Lunch

    13:50 TRAINING FOR COMPLEX OPERATIONS

    Major Tim Hutchison

    Major Tim Hutchison, Officer Commanding, Urban operations Wing, Land Warfare Centre, Ministry of Defence, UK

  • Individual training
  • Collective training
  • FIBUA instructor / advisor training
  • Generic sub-unit package
  • 14:30 SOLDIER MODERNISATION

    Emma Sparks

    Emma Sparks, Lecturer, Engineering and Systems Department, Cranfield University

  • Urban operations, ensuring the ‘right’ balance of capability
  • Identification of key stakeholders; making the trade-off work
  • Instilling confidence; making robust and enduring decisions
  • Measuring success
  • What does it all mean for the future of soldier modernisation?
  • 15:10 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 COMBAT ID

    William Suttie

    William Suttie, Dstl, Minstry of Defence, UK and International Chairman, Combat Identification Technical Working Group

  • The fratricide problem
  • CID Challenges in the Urban Environment
  • Technical Solutions
  • STANAG 4630
  • Trials and assessment activities
  • 16:20 LOOKING TO THE FUTURE

    Peter Caddick-Adams

    Peter Caddick-Adams, Lecturer, Cranfield University

    17:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

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    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

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    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

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