Home
overview
ISR has become increasingly central to the modern warfighting capability of national militaries. It has both a tactical use for assessing potential targets, threats and strike evaluation; and a strategic/political use to limit collateral damage, and provide an accurate update of military achievements.

This conference will address the developing capabilities that integrate command direction, sensors, and processed intelligence with timely dissemination in order to provide decision makers with effective ‘Situational Awareness’. It will examine, in detail, the dynamic process from tasking a platform or unit for reconnaissance through to collection and processing of the resulting information.

The programme will cover all aspects of ISR from short-range battlefield reconnaissance to satellite and high altitude surveillance.

Benefits of Attending:
· UNDERSTAND the increasingly central role of ISR in combat operations
· IDENTIFY the next stages in NATO and coalition surveillance programmes
· APPRAISE the importance of ISR to the network-centric concept
· ASSESS the main trends in ISR technology and techniques
· DISCOVER the growing importance of space-based surveillance
· EXPLORE the possibilities, limitations and applications of ISR systems

A unique opportunity to learn from leading military and industry experts including:

  • Major General Gary A Winterberger, Force Commander, NATO Airborne Early Warning and Control Force Command
  • Colonel Mike Cantor, Program Manager Comanche, US Army
  • Lieutenant Colonel Michael Glaccum, U2 Program Manager, US Air Force
  • Lieutenant Colonel Kurt Schake, Offensive Air Requirements, Allied Command Transformation, NATO
  • Allan McKenzie, Chief, C2 Systems Design and Architecture Branch, NATO C3 Agency
  • Anthony Lisuzzo, Director, Intelligence and Information Warfare Directorate, US Army
  • Captain David Gardam, Director, Maritime Policy, Operations and Readiness, National Defence Headquarters, Canada
  • Dr David Hull, Technical Capability Leader, ISTAR, DSTL
  • Professor Peter Hoogeboom, Senior Advisor Radar, TNO-FEL
  • Guy DuBois, Vice President Imagery & Geospatial Systems, Information and Dissemination Systems, Raytheon

    “Very professional, great cross section of expertise…
    I learned and enjoyed”

    Captain Peter Avis, Director, Policy, Operations and Readiness, Department of National Defence

  • Conference programme

    8:30 Registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Martin Streetly

    Martin Streetly, , Radar and Electronic Warfare Consultant and Author

    9:10 OPENING ADDRESS

    Dennis Fitzgerald

    Dennis Fitzgerald, Deputy Director, National Reconnaissance Office

  • The changing purpose and remit of the NRO
  • Squaring the circle: maintaining operations in an era of greater scrutiny
  • The fundamental importance of rapid intelligence to national security
  • The differing requirements of fighting the War on Terror from the Cold War
  • How NRO assets are becoming increasingly indispensable
  • Continuously improving interaction with the wider intelligence community and allies
  • 9:40 KEYNOTE ADDRESS

    Major General Gary A. Winterberger

    Major General Gary A. Winterberger, Force Commander, NATO Airborne Early Warning and Control Force Command

  • Defining a role in the 21st century for the NATO AEW & Control Force Command
  • Air surveillance and communications support for air operations; counter-air, close air support, rescue, reconnaissance and airlift
  • Mission, people, tasking and collection process
  • Platforms used and their contributions
  • 10:20 NATO’S ALLIANCE GROUND SURVEILLANCE (AGS) REQUIREMENT

    Lieutenant Colonel Kurt Schake

    Lieutenant Colonel Kurt Schake, Offensive Air Requirements, Allied Command Transformation, NATO

  • NATO-owned and operated core capability
  • Supplementation by interoperable national assets
  • Recent NATO developments
  • Programme timelines
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 INCORPORATION OF ISR NATO C2

    Allan McKenzie

    Allan McKenzie, Chief, C2 Systems Design and Architecture Branch, NATO C3 Agency

  • Distinction between intelligence and surveillance is being minimised
  • Planning, management and distribution of ISR data affects many command levels
  • CIS infrastructure must be re-organised to accommodate real-time ISR information
  • Implementation of integrated ISR could significantly improve NATO’s military capabilities
  • 12:00 ISR DATA INTEGRATION

    Peter Doran

    Peter Doran, Chair, ISR Working Group, NATO

  • ISR as a NATO alliance tool
  • Developing the necessary tools and technical interface standards
  • Achieving interoperability between alliance partners
  • The differing requirements of NATO nations
  • 12:40 Networking Lunch

    14:00 SURVEILLANCE AND MARITIME DOMESTIC POLICY

    Captain David Gardam

    Captain David Gardam, Director Maritime Policy, Operations and Readiness, National Defence Headquarters, Canada

  • The battlespace in domestic security requires interagency co-operation
  • Surveillance must now be defined in a broad fashion
  • Government must be involved to permit information and intelligence sharing
  • North America presents unique challenges and has many gaps
  • Through co-operation, information sharing and fusion, gaps can be filled
  • Areas of improvement
    Areas still requiring transformation
  • 14:40 THE IMPORTANCE OF IMAGERY AND GEOSPATIAL SYSTEMS FOR ENHANCED SITUATIONAL AWARENESS

    Guy DuBois

    Guy DuBois, Vice President Imagery and Geospatial Systems, Information Management and Dissemination Systems, Raytheon

  • The complete imagery cycle
  • Sources of imagery – national, tactical, commercial
  • Merging imagery and geospatial data for a complete picture
  • Lessons learned from recent events – Gulf, Bosnia, Afghanistan and Iraq
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 MAKING EFFECTIVE USE OF GLOBAL TECHNOLOGY

    Colonel J Douglas Beason PhD

    Colonel J Douglas Beason PhD, Director ISR, Los Alamos National Laboratory

  • Details to be confirmed
  • 16:20 DIFFICULT TARGETS AND DIFFICULT ENVIRONMENTS

    Dr David Hull

    Dr David Hull, Technical Capability Leader, ISTAR, DSTL

  • The difference between developers assumptions and warfare as experienced by the warfighter
  • Constructing testing and development equipment to simulate that experience
  • The next generation of ISR technologies
  • The limitations of physics upon ISR equipment and electronic warfare
  • How advances are alleviating those limitations
  • Maximising the importance of the man-in-the-loop
  • 17:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Martin Streetly

    Martin Streetly, , Radar and Electronic Warfare Consultant and Author

    9:10 THE NEXT GENERATION OF ISR OBJECTIVES

    Anthony Lisuzzo

    Anthony Lisuzzo, Director, Intelligence and Information Warfare Directorate, US Army

  • The work of the Intelligence and Information Warfare Directorate
  • Removing stove pipes from the information network
  • The principles behind disseminating increasing quantities of information material
  • 9:40 AIRBORNE GROUND SURVEILLANCE

    Professor Peter Hoogeboom

    Professor Peter Hoogeboom, Senior Advisor Radar, TNO-FEL

  • Identification of airborne ground system surveillance requirements
  • Relation of SOSTAR-X to AGS developments
  • Aiming for interoperability
  • Current radar developments and technical project status
  • A look at future technological advances
  • 10:20 MARITIME SURVEILLANCE

    Squadron Leader Gary Morgan

    Squadron Leader Gary Morgan, OC Nimrod Operation Evalation Unit, Royal Air Force

  • UK requirements for airborne maritime surveillance
  • Procurement of new Nimrod MRA4 patrol aircraft
  • Overview of new mission systems: radar, electro-optic, ESM, acoustic
  • The asymmetric threat and developments in Network-Centric warfare
  • Traditional roles of ASW and AsuW moving from blue water to brown water
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 ROTORCRAFT SURVEILLANCE

    Colonel Mike Cantor

    Colonel Mike Cantor, Program Manager Comanche, US Army

  • The priority ISR mission of the Comanche
  • How Low Observable technology will aid the intelligence and surveillance role
  • The advantages of having ‘eyes on the target’
  • In-built information interconnectivity
  • Developing tactics to exploit the Comanche’s capability
  • 12:00 ALLIANCE GROUND SURVEILLANCE

    James Moseman

    James Moseman, Director, Europe and NATO, Northrop Grumman International Inc.

  • Assessment of NATO's requirement
  • TIPS' Proposed System Architecture
  • System functionality and growth potential
  • Industrial participation
  • 12:40 Networking Lunch

    13:40 HIGH ALTITUDE RECONNAISSANCE

    Lieutenant Colonel Michael Glaccum

    Lieutenant Colonel Michael Glaccum, U2 Program Manager, US Air Force

  • Introduction
  • An overview of current U-2 and Global Hawk capabilities
  • Summary of U-2 and Global Hawk performance in Operation Enduring and Iraqi Freedom
  • Complimentary U-2 and Global Hawk roles in peacetime and contingency operations
  • 14:40 OPERATIONAL ISR

    Gavin Dyer

    Gavin Dyer, ISR, Qinetiq

  • RAF present capability
  • UK experience in the Gulf and Kosovo
  • The change from wet-film to digital reconnaissance
  • The advantages of digital reconnaissance
  • Prospective future developments
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 ISR BATTLE MANAGEMENT AND VISUALISATION

    Curt Osterheld

    Curt Osterheld, Vice President Business Development, L-3 Communications

  • Current technologies at the disposal of the operational commander
  • Future projects under development
  • Additional capabilities this platform will have over previous platforms
  • UAV developments for the future
  • Counter stealth – can stealth stay ahead?
  • 16:20 UAVs: KEY FACTORS IN FUTURE ISR TASKS

    Franz Bucher

    Franz Bucher, Projects & Marketing Manager, EADS-Dornier

  • Segments and systems of the ISR architecture
  • UAV segment in change of common acceptability
  • Operational requirements for strategic, theatre and tactical ISR systems
  • Suitability of UAVs for ISR tasks
  • CONOPS parameter for UAV engagement
  • 17:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

    +

    Workshops

    Commercial geo-spatial ISR
    Workshop

    Commercial geo-spatial ISR

    The Hatton, at etc. venues
    3rd March 2004
    London, United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    51/53 Hatton Garden
    London EC1N 8HN
    United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    HOTEL BOOKING FORM

    Title

    SubTitle
    speaker image

    Content


    Title


    Description

    Download


    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

    Event Title

    Headline

    Text
    Read More

    I would like to speak at an event

    I would like to attend an event

    I would like to sponsor/exhibit at an event

    SIGN UP OR LOGIN

    Sign up
    Forgotten Password?

    Contact SMi GROUP LTD

    UK Office
    Opening Hours: 9.00 - 17.30 (local time)
    SMi Group Ltd, 1 Westminster Bridge Road, London, SE1 7XW, United Kingdom
    Tel: +44 (0) 20 7827 6000 Fax: +44 (0) 20 7827 6001
    Website: http://www.smi-online.co.uk Email: events@smi-online.co.uk
    Registered in England No: 3779287 VAT No: GB 976 2951 71




    Forgotten Password

    Please enter the email address you registered with. We will email you a new password.