Home
overview
Benefits of attending:

CHALLENGE your understanding of Battle Management C4I in the 21st Century

ASSESS the possibilities, limitations, implications and applications of using C4I within the battlefield

UNDERSTAND the integral role and importance data management

IDENTIFY the specific systems currently being incorporated and the future military needs of land systems

DEVELOP and assess the challenges and importance of knowledge management in NATO commands

A unique opportunity to learn from leading military experts including:

  • Colonel Alec Bain, Command and Control Development Centre, Land Warfare Centre, British Army
  • Colonel John Blaine, C4 Systems, Space & Networks Division, Office of the Chief Information Officer/C6, US Army
  • Colonel Nickolas Justice, PM FBCB2, Program Executive Office, Command, Control & Communications (Tactical), US Army
  • Lieutenant Colonel Douglas Kuehl, Product Manager – PM TIMS, US Army
  • Lieutenant Colonel Greg Hoscheit, Chief, Exercises & Training Division, US Army Space & Missile Defense Command
  • Major Mark Gidney, S02 Concept Development, Army Data Services, Directorate of Information, British Army Major (Ret’d) Eamon Ross, S02 Digitization, British Army
  • Dr Alain Houles, Chief, C2 Concepts and Architecture Branch, Command and Control Systems Division, NATO C3 Agency
  • Conference programme

    8:30 Registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Colonel (Ret’d) Jeremy Barrett

    Colonel (Ret’d) Jeremy Barrett, Head of Defence Systems, Hi-Q Systems

    9:10 C4 SYSTEMS AND NETWORKS

    Colonel John Blaine

    Colonel John Blaine, C4 Systems, Space & Networks Division, Office of the Chief Information Officer/C6, US Army

  • C4 operating environment
  • How much bandwidth is enough?
  • Objective force network requirements
  • Tactics, techniques, procedures and reducing complexity
  • Managing the army systems and networks
  • 9:40 COMMAND AND CONTROL WITHIN THE BATTLEFIELD

    Colonel Alec Bain

    Colonel Alec Bain, Command and Control Development Centre, Land Warfare Centre, British Army

  • The operational concept explained
  • Achieving enhanced situational awareness and faster decisions
  • New command and control systems
  • The role of the command and control development centre
  • Ensuring flexibility, creativity and adaptability for unknown command factors
  • Recent experiences
  • 10:20 INFORMATION AND KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT

    Dr Klaus Müller

    Dr Klaus Müller, Special Advisor on Intelligence and Functional Area Systems, ORFS Division, NATO C3 Agency

  • Challenges for knowledge management in NATO new missions information overload hierarchical structures and “stove pipes”
  • Policy initiatives
  • NATO intelligence community strategies addressing knowledge management challenges
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 JOINT WARRIOR INTEROPERABILITY DEMONSTRATION 2002

    Colonel Gary Bradley

    Colonel Gary Bradley, Director, JWID Joint Project Office, USMC

  • Greater emphasis on today’s coalition warfare realities
  • Interoperability surge operation directed at solving immediate interoperability challenges
  • Increased analytical rigor assessing technological solutions from architectural, security, technical and operational perspectives
  • Increased value to CINCs, services and agencies in support of the Joint/Coalition Warfighter
  • 12:00 ROLF 2010

    Professor Berndt Brehmer

    Professor Berndt Brehmer, Command and Control Decision Making, Swedish National Defence College

  • Development of command and control system function in battle management
  • The human need for technical support
  • The technical possibilities to fulfil human needs
  • The military joint function towards 2010 – a vision
  • Co-ordination prior to attack
  • The work ahead
  • 12:40 Lunch

    13:40 WINNING ON THE BATTLEFIELD IN THE 21ST CENTURY

    Colonel Nickolas Justice

    Colonel Nickolas Justice, PM FBCB2, Program Executive Office, Command, Control & Communications (Tactical), US Army

  • The principal digital command and control system for the warfighter.
  • Battle command and situational Awareness
  • The tactical Internet - a new technology.
  • Working at the soldier / platform level (power down or centralized command)
  • The next steps for FBCB2
  • 14:20 ISSUES FACING NETWORKED FORCES

    Major (Ret’d) Eamon Ross

    Major (Ret’d) Eamon Ross, S02 Digitization, British Army

  • Providing a coherent information space
  • Information management – an integrating service
  • Collaborative working – distributed and co-located
  • Findings from UK research experience
  • The impact for UK’s network enabled capability
  • 15:00 NEAR-TERM DIGITAL RADIO (NTDR)

    Major Duane Amsler

    Major Duane Amsler, Product Director, NTDR, US Army

  • Commercial Off The Shelf (COTS) based design
  • Networking characteristics
  • Systems architecture
  • Lessons learned
  • 15:40 Afternoon Tea

    16:00 THROUGH-LIFE INTEROPERABILITY PLANNING (TULIP) PROCESS FOR C4I

    Steve Cottle

    Steve Cottle, Business Unit Leader – Information Management, STASYS

  • Establishing the requirement for interoperability
  • Requirements management for interoperable C4I capabilities
  • Interoperability analysis
  • Through-life interoperability assurance
  • System-of-systems interoperability analysis and capability audit
  • Example applications of the TULIP process
  • 16:40 INFORMATION DOMINANCE

    Nigel Mackie

    Nigel Mackie, Director, Communications and Information Systems, INSYS

  • Sensor-to-shooter
  • The issues
  • Enhancing the command and control operational decision making
  • Breaking the learning curve
  • An example
  • 17:20 BATMAN 21

    Ted Fullick

    Ted Fullick, Technical Director, WA Systems

  • The role of the BATMAN 21
  • What does the BATMAN 21 provide?
  • The use of data within the system
  • Boundaries broken
  • The common application of the system
  • 18:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Professor Michael Moulding

    Professor Michael Moulding, Head of Communication and Information Systems Engineering Group, Cranfield University

    9:10 LEVERAGING COMMERCIAL BEST PRACTICES IN BMC4I

    Lieutenant Colonel Greg Hoscheit

    Lieutenant Colonel Greg Hoscheit, Chief, Exercises & Training Division, US Army Space & Missile Defense Command

  • Current state of the art
  • The Space and Missile Defense Battle Lab’s comprehensive approach to innovating BMC4I
  • Prototyping a BMC4I capability – feedback from the field
  • The acquisition challenge
  • Future directions
  • 9:40 DATA MANAGEMENT

    Major Mark Gidney

    Major Mark Gidney, S02 Concept Development, Army Data Services, Directorate of Information, British Army

  • The need for corporate data
  • Data modelling
  • Implementation requirements’ options
  • Database options
  • 10:20 GLOBAL COMMAND AND CONTROL SYSTEM – ARMY (GCCS-A)

    Lieutenant Colonel Michael Williamson

    Lieutenant Colonel Michael Williamson, PM GCCS – A, US Army

  • Reasons for the GCCS-A development
  • What will the GCCS provide – situational awareness, readiness, planning, mobilization and deployment capability information
  • Who will be using this information and why?
  • GCCS-A as a key interoperability C2 system
  • Key benefits to decision makers
  • The way ahead
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 COMBAT IDENTIFICATION SYSTEMS

    Lieutenant Colonel Douglas Kuehl

    Lieutenant Colonel Douglas Kuehl, Product Manager, Target Identification & Meteorological Sensors, US Army

  • Currently fielded systems
  • Combat ID technologies and tradeoffs
  • Advanced Concept Technology Demonstrations (ACTD)
  • Combat ID sensor fusion
  • 12:00 BATTLE MANAGEMENT FOR GROUND BASED AIR DEFENCE

    Fabian Ochsner

    Fabian Ochsner, Vice President, Product Support, Oerlikon Contraves Zurich

  • Today’s restrictions
  • Evolving threat
  • Active control of GBAD deployments
  • Mission planning and battle management
  • More kills with less shooters
  • Modules of GBAD control center
  • 12:40 Lunch

    14:00 GROUND COMMAND AND CONTROL

    Dr Alain Houles

    Dr Alain Houles, Chief, C2 Concepts and Architecture Branch, Command and Control Systems Division, NATO C3 Agency

  • Battle management requirements for potential future operations
  • Achieving enhanced situational awareness and faster decisions
  • New challenges in C4ISR
  • The role of design and architecture process in battle management
  • Sharing data in a coalition environment
  • Recent experiences in military exercises
  • 14:40 CANADIAN-CENTRIC

  • JWID 2002-2003 and beyond
  • New emerging IT for the CF
  • The future in the CFEC ‘Our way ahead’
  • Major Rob Kearney

    Major Rob Kearney, J9 Integration, Canadian Forces Experimentation Centre

    Dr Kendall Wheaton

    Dr Kendall Wheaton, J9 Experimentation & Design, Canadian Forces Experimentation Centre

    15:20 INFORMATION SYSTEMS AND DECISION SUPPORT

    Peter Alvå

    Peter Alvå, Senior Research Officer, FOI

  • The systems currently in use
  • Effects of the information network
  • Enhancing the command and control operational decision making
  • Illustration in a combat scenario
  • 16:00 Afternoon Tea

    16:20 BATTLE COMMAND IN THE DIGITIZED ERA

    Donald Willis

    Donald Willis, President, Command System

  • Bowman/BSAM foundation for digitization
  • Bowman/BSAM foundation for BISAs
  • UK digitization and key allies
  • Key features for accelerating the command cycle
  • The way ahead
  • 17:00 C4I INFORMATION DISPLAYS

    Mike Forde

    Mike Forde, Market Director C4I, BarcoView

  • The eyes of the battlefield situation
  • Influence of COTS
  • Transition from CRT to LCD
  • Coping with COTS - modularity
  • Response to networking – thin clients
  • Networking and visualisation – getting more out of the digitized image
  • 17:40 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

    +

    Workshops

    Handheld C4 and Wireless Communications
    Workshop

    Handheld C4 and Wireless Communications

    The Hatton, at etc. venues
    11th October 2002
    London, United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    51/53 Hatton Garden
    London EC1N 8HN
    United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    HOTEL BOOKING FORM

    Title

    SubTitle
    speaker image

    Content


    Title


    Description

    Download


    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

    Event Title

    Headline

    Text
    Read More

    I would like to speak at an event

    I would like to attend an event

    I would like to sponsor/exhibit at an event

    SIGN UP OR LOGIN

    Sign up
    Forgotten Password?

    Contact SMi GROUP LTD

    UK Office
    Opening Hours: 9.00 - 17.30 (local time)
    SMi Group Ltd, 1 Westminster Bridge Road, London, SE1 7XW, United Kingdom
    Tel: +44 (0) 20 7827 6000 Fax: +44 (0) 20 7827 6001
    Website: http://www.smi-online.co.uk Email: events@smi-online.co.uk
    Registered in England No: 3779287 VAT No: GB 976 2951 71




    Forgotten Password

    Please enter the email address you registered with. We will email you a new password.