Home
overview
The Conference will address the current themes in anti-ship missile development and countermeasures against attack by these weapons. Areas that will be covered are: new missile technology developments, upgrades of existing systems, new developments in guidance systems, plus discussions of doctrine and tactics regarding anti-ship missile use. The second section of the conference will discuss hard-kill and soft-kill defences against anti-ship missiles, this will include defensive missile systems, electronic warfare and countermeasures plus modelling of missile defence.

Benefits of attending:
· DISCOVER the importance ASMs are playing in the military battlespace
· ADDRESS future anti-ship missile development within the world's navies
· COMPARE capabilities of different missile systems
· UNDERSTAND the requirements for missile defence in the 21st Century
· EVALUATE soft and hard kill technologies for missile defence

A unique opportunity to learn from leading industry experts including:
· Captain Louis Geanuleas, Head, Missile Defence Branch, Surface Warfare Directorate, OPNAV N76, US Navy
· Commander Christophe Balducchi, Head of the Above Water Warfare Department, French Naval Planning Division
· Commander RSwN (Reserve) Manne Koerfer, Director Strategic Marketing Surface-to-Surface Missiles, Saab Bofors Dynamics
· Commander Jan Floderström, Head of Surface Warfare Branch, Naval Forces Development Department, Swedish Armed Forces Headquarters
· Lieutenant Commander Richard Kammann Jr, Assistant Program Manager Systems Engineering, Conventional Strike Weapons Programme, Naval Air Systems Command
· Dr Eric Grove, Director, Centre for Security Studies, The University of Hull
· Paul Pulsifer, Head, Communication and Navigation Warfare Section, Defence Research and Development Canada
· Hedzer Komduur, Programme Manager: Propulsion and Control Concepts for Guided Weapons and Projectiles, Rocket Technology Department, TNO Prins Maurtis Laboratory

Conference programme

8:30 Registration and Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

E R Hooton

E R Hooton, Editor, Jane's Naval Weapons Systems

9:10 KEYNOTE ADDRESS

Dr Eric Grove

Dr Eric Grove, Director, Centre for Security Studies, University of Hull

  • The evolution of anti-ship missile warfare
  • Recent technological advances
  • New missile systems’ impact on naval tactics
  • Developments within anti-ship missile technology
  • 9:40 FUTURE NAVAL REQUIREMENTS

    Commander Christophe Balducchi

    Commander Christophe Balducchi, Head of the Above Water Warfare Department, French Navy Planning Division, French Naval Staff

  • The Navy’s vision for the 21st Century
  • The French Navy’s specific requirements for anti ship missiles
  • Future anti-ship missile development, to upgrade or develop new weapons programmes?
  • 10:20 FUTURE NAVAL REQUIREMENTS

    Commander Keith Mullaly

    Commander Keith Mullaly, Director Maritime Requirements, Above water warfare, Canadian Department of National Defence

    10:50 Morning Coffee

    11:45 THE HARPOON ANTI-SHIP MISSILE

    Kevin Hanley

    Kevin Hanley, Director International Programs, Naval Weapons, Integrated Defense Systems, Boeing

  • Current capabilities of the Harpoon missile
  • Upgrading the system to meet future developments in missile defence
  • 12:25 RBS15 MK3

  • Operational background and experiences
  • From national defence to international operations
  • Future capabilities from an operational point of view
  • The RBS15 Mk3 - a key player in littoral warfare
  • Target seeker development
  • Naval land attack capability and the dual use of anti-ship missiles
  • Commander RSwN (Reserve) Manne K A Koerfer

    Commander RSwN (Reserve) Manne K A Koerfer, Director Strategic Marketing, Surface-to-Surface Missiles, Saab Bofors Dynamics

    Commander Jan Floderström

    Commander Jan Floderström, Head of Surface Warfare Branch, Naval Forces Development Department, Swedish Armed Forces Headquarters

    13:10 Networking Lunch

    14:10 MISSILE GUIDANCE SYSTEMS

    Chris Alder

    Chris Alder, Product Area Manager, QinetiQ

  • Radar, infra-red and multi-spectral technologies
  • Performance attributes
  • Current developments
  • Future developments
  • 14:45 SUPERSONIC (SC)RAMJET-PROPELLED ANTI-SHIP MISSILES

    Hedzer Komduur

    Hedzer Komduur, Programme Manager: Propulsion and Control Concepts for Guided Weapons and Projectiles, Rocket Technology Department, TNO Prins Maurtis Laboratory

  • Modelling a state of the art ramjet-propelled threat
  • Simulated performance of an interceptor missile against the threat
  • Feasibility of hypersonic (sc)ramjet-propelled anti-ship missiles
  • Future research on application of modern guidance laws to interceptor missiles
  • 15:25 THE EXOCET MISSILE FAMILY

    Guy de Beaucorps

    Guy de Beaucorps, Military Advisor, MBDA

  • MM 40 Block 3 operational features
  • MM 40 Block 3 technical description
  • MM 40 Block 3 master plan
  • 16:05 Afternoon Tea

    16:15 VULNERABILITY OF MODERN WARSHIPS

    Doug Wright

    Doug Wright, Principle Vulnerability Scientist, QinetiQ

  • Has there been an increase in the ability of a warship to withstand attack?
  • What is the effectiveness of shaped charge warheads against ships?
  • Does Kinetic Energy add to the destructive power of anti-ship warheads?
  • Can the next generation of modern warships withstanding an ASM hit?
  • 16:55 EVOLUTION OF WEAPONS SYSTEMS

    Ari Sacher

    Ari Sacher, Chief Engineer, AGM-142, Rafael

    17:35 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    E R Hooton

    E R Hooton, Editor, Jane's Naval Weapons Systems

    9:10 NAVAL MISSILE DEFENCE

    Captain Louis Geanuleas

    Captain Louis Geanuleas, Deputy Director, Navy Missile Defence, OPNAV, US Navy

  • Future threats against naval operations
  • Defending against anti-ship missiles
  • Tactical considerations for defence in different environments
  • Technology to be utilised for defence
  • Future developments in missile defence
  • 9:40 FUTURE DEVELOPMENTS IN NAVAL MISSILE DEFENCE

    Martin Dougherty

    Martin Dougherty, , Freelance Analyst and Writer

  • The effectiveness of current defensive systems
  • The threat - future anti-ship missile development
  • Developing hard-kill weapons systems to counter advanced ASMs
  • Advances in soft-kill technology
  • Constant development: maintaining the defensive advantage
  • 10:20 ASSESSING THE LETHALITY OF MISSILE DEFENCE

    Pat Collins

    Pat Collins, Missiles and Countermeasures Department, DSTL

  • Modelling the threats
  • Assessing the vulnerability of anti-ship and littoral threats
  • The effect of range to go on lethality
  • Comparing the performance of candidate weapons systems
  • Future requirements for lethality modelling
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 ANTI-SHIP MISSILE DEFENCE IN THE LITTORAL

    Albert Bridgewater

    Albert Bridgewater, Acting Chief Scientist, DRDC Ottawa

  • Addressing the need for faster reaction times to anti-ship missile threats
  • Defending against new highly manoeuvrable high velocity missiles
  • SWSIS providing a solution for operating in the littoral environment
  • Research and development into the integration of sensors and weapons systems
  • The benefits of SISWS
  • 12:00 THE FUTURE SURFACE TO AIR FAMILY OF MISSILE SYSTEMS

    Regis Gautier

    Regis Gautier, Marketing Manager, Eurosam

  • The principal anti air missile system’s components
  • The Aster 15 and Aster 30 missile systems
  • Capabilities of the FSAM system
  • Results from missile trials
  • Creating a universal defence against future anti-ship missiles
  • 12:40 Networking Lunch

    13:40 MISSILE DEFENCE

    Yackov Rotsztein

    Yackov Rotsztein, Project Manager, RAFAEL

  • Protecting combat vessels against sea skimming missiles
  • Defending against supersonic missile threats
  • Engaging multiple targets
  • Defending against future missile systems
  • Future developments
  • 14:20 THE EVOLVED SEASPARROW MISSILE

    Ray Poage

    Ray Poage, Program Manager, Raytheon

  • Requirements for an interoperable missile defence
  • Providing self protection for surface ships
  • A collaborative programme for missile defence
  • Benefits of the ESSM system
  • Protecting against all threats
  • Dog-fight modifications
    Future developments
  • 15:00 MARITIME ELECTRONIC WARFARE

    Dr Jahn-Andreas Maeland

    Dr Jahn-Andreas Maeland, Senior Scientist, Norwegian Defence Research Establishment

  • Requirements of electronic warfare systems for the 21st Century
  • EW for major surface combatants and minor ships
  • Questioning decoys ability to fool modern missile seekers
  • Use of EW in the OODA loop
  • Problems with using missile countermeasures in a fleet
  • Countering attacking platforms
  • 15:40 Afternoon Tea

    16:00 INTELLIGENT PROTECTION SYSTEMS

    Heinz Bannasch

    Heinz Bannasch, Director of Naval & Air Self Protection Systems, BUCK Neue Technologien GmbH

  • Placing the right decoy at the right time in the right place
  • Providing 5 degrees of freedom
  • Providing multi-spectral defence
  • Providing seeker tested performance
  • 16:40 NAVAL DECOY SYSTEMS

    Steen N Rasmussen

    Steen N Rasmussen, Programme Manager, SKWS, Terma

  • Current decoy systems
  • Defending against new threats
  • New developments of dual mode decoys
  • Defending against imaging missile seekers
  • 17:20 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

    +

    Workshops

    Improving Ship Defence by Improved Understanding of Passive Countermeasures
    Workshop

    Improving Ship Defence by Improved Understanding of Passive Countermeasures

    The Hatton, at etc. venues
    31st October 2003
    London, United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    51/53 Hatton Garden
    London EC1N 8HN
    United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    HOTEL BOOKING FORM

    Title

    SubTitle
    speaker image

    Content


    Title


    Description

    Download


    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

    Event Title

    Headline

    Text
    Read More

    I would like to speak at an event

    I would like to attend an event

    I would like to sponsor/exhibit at an event

    SIGN UP OR LOGIN

    Sign up
    Forgotten Password?

    Contact SMi GROUP LTD

    UK Office
    Opening Hours: 9.00 - 17.30 (local time)
    SMi Group Ltd, 1 Westminster Bridge Road, London, SE1 7XW, United Kingdom
    Tel: +44 (0) 20 7827 6000 Fax: +44 (0) 20 7827 6001
    Website: http://www.smi-online.co.uk Email: events@smi-online.co.uk
    Registered in England No: 3779287 VAT No: GB 976 2951 71




    Forgotten Password

    Please enter the email address you registered with. We will email you a new password.