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The use of COTS information technology products in military environments is becoming increasingly commonplace. COTS in Defence 2003 is an inaugural event and will look at the evolution of commercial off the shelf in the development and deployment phases of Defence programmes.

The event will look at how the use of COTS is bringing promises of cost reduction, performance improvement, and accelerated development cycles whilst addressing the key issues of obsolescence management, ownership and licensing, reliability, security and cost. It will uncover country specific policies and procurement strategies as well as give detailed case studies on current and future interoperability of commercial and defence products.

Benefits of Attending:
· EXPLORE the benefits of using leading edge commercial technology in defence applications
· DISCOVER the importance of whole lifecycle planning and improve obsolescence and upgrade management
· REVIEW country specific procurement strategies and COTS policy
· ANALYSE AND MITIGATE the risks of COTS utilisation
· IDENTIFY the main criteria for choosing a COTS supplier
· GAIN an insight into the future of COTS technology in defence
· MAXIMISE your networking opportunities in a globally attended forum

A unique opportunity to learn from military, government, research & industry experts including:
· Lieutenant Colonel Joe Besselman, System Program Director, Global Combat Support System – Air Force, US Air Force
· Lieutenant Colonel Esa Salminen, Chief of CIS Centre, Finnish Defence Forces
· Wing Commander Rodger Pickavance, Avionics Support Group, (ES) Air, RAF Wyton
· Lieutenant Commander Jeremy Franks, CTS, ILS Head of Specialisation, Obsolescence Management, Ministry of Defence, UK
· Dr Mark Vigder, Research Officer, Institute for IT, National Research Council, Canada and Chair of the NATO Technical Group IST-018/RTG-005 (Use of COTS in Military Systems), NATO RTO
· James Degenford, PKI Advocate, Department of Defence PKI
· Tom McCutcheon, Senior Scientist, Computers, Information & Signal Processing (CISP), Defence Science and Technology Laboratories, Ministry of Defence, UK
· Wouter Konings, Senior Software Engineer, NATO C3 Agency
· Stephane Collignon, Senior Information Technology Officer, Defence Science and Technology Organisation, Australia
. Erez Yarden (Lt.Col.Ret'd), Associate Vice President, Defense Market, Optical Networks Division, ECI Telecom

Conference programme

8:30 Registration and Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Paul Kennedy

Paul Kennedy, Independant Consultant, Information Systems and Management Services

9:10 OVERVIEW OF COTS IN US DEFENCE

James Degenford

James Degenford, PKI Advocate, Department of Defence PKI

  • Definition of COTS policy in US
  • Overview of recent developments – ie smart cards
  • Possible problems with COTS implementation
  • Benefits of using COTS in 21st Century defence
  • Maximising COTS applications in the future
  • 9:40 COTS FROM A CANADIAN PERSPECTIVE

    Dr Mark Vigder

    Dr Mark Vigder, Research Officer, Institute for IT / and Chair of the NATO Technical Group IST-018/RTG-005 (Use of COTS in Military Systems), National Research Council, Canada / NATO RTO

  • Requirements analysis and risk assessment
  • Technologies and standards for effective COTS integration
  • Lifecycle management
  • 10:20 NATO PERSPECTIVE

    Wouter Konings

    Wouter Konings, Senior Software Engineer, NATO C3 Agency

  • Recent developments in NATO COTS Policy
  • NATO C3 Technical Architecture
  • NATO Common Operating Environment
  • Future developments in NATO COTS strategy
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 COMMERCIAL KNOW-HOW AND TECHNOLOGY IN THE FINNISH FORCES

    Lieutenant Colonel Esa Salminen

    Lieutenant Colonel Esa Salminen, Chief of CIS Centre, Finnish Defence Forces

  • Meeting the capability requirements of the Finnish forces through the use of COTS
  • Achieving interoperability between static and mobile troops - Deployable COTS Network concept
  • Enhancing capability through the use of COTS technology
  • Nordic Brigade’s CIS concept - Kosovo case
  • 12:00 COTS INTEGRATION

    Stephane Collignon

    Stephane Collignon, Senior Information Technology Officer, Defence Science and Technology Organisation, Australia

  • Practical definition of system-of-systems
  • Comparison of generic design drivers between large software systems and stand-alone packages
  • Analysis of the problem context presented by the system-of-systems evolution task
  • Practical approaches to realising evolving defence system-of-systems
  • 12:40 Networking Lunch

    13:40 COMPARISON AND SELECTION OF COTS TECHNOLOGY

    Professor Jorma Jormakka

    Professor Jorma Jormakka, Professor of Military Techniques, Department of Technology / and Professor of Telecommunications, Finland Networking Laboratory, National Defence College, Finland / Helsinki University of Technology

  • Problems in the traditional requirement oriented design
  • Problems in comparison of alternatives using multiple criteria analysis
  • Technology evolution and technology wars, selecting the right technology
  • Enhancements to combat performance analysis
  • Role of standards
  • Interfacing to military C3 systems and architecture documentation
  • 14:20 APPLICATION OF COTS TO NATO AND COALITION COMMAND CONTROL INFORMATION SYSTEMS (CCIS)

    Dr Klaus Muller

    Dr Klaus Muller, , Independent Consultant in Military Information Systems

  • The synergy between COTS and warfighter-driven evolutionary development of CCIS
  • NATO CCIS requirements for current and future operations
  • How does COTS fit in?
  • Coalition CCIS requirements
  • Problem: how to design a coalition CCIS when you don’t know who all your coalition partners will be?
  • Problem: how to train warfighters in the use of a coalition CCIS?
    Is COTS the panacea for coalition CCIS?
  • 15:00 AIR FORCE APPLICATION

    Wing Commander Rodger Pickavance

    Wing Commander Rodger Pickavance, Avionics Support Group, (ES) Air, RAF Wyton

  • Types of COTS-based systems
  • Problems with COTS-based products
  • Economic advantage of COTS
  • Risk reduction
  • Reliability of COTS products
  • 15:40 Afternoon Tea

    16:00 COTS SOLUTIONS FOR MILITARY TRANSMISSION NETWORKS

    Erez Yarden (Lt. Col. Ret’d)

    Erez Yarden (Lt. Col. Ret’d), Associate Vice- President, Defense Market, Optical Networks Division, ECI Telecom

    16:40 COMMERCIAL CASE STUDY

    Andrew Pine

    Andrew Pine, Director International Operations, Mercury Computer Systems

  • EMPAR programme overview
  • Levels of COTS rugged packaging
  • Matching COTS capabilities to military requirements
  • Results and programme status
  • Applying lessons learned
  • 17:10 DRINKS RECEPTION SPONSORED BY: Mercury Computer Systems

    17:20 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Dr Derek  Wright

    Dr Derek Wright, Head of Acquisition and Logistics, DOD Management and Security Analysis, Cranfield University

    9:10 PROS AND CONS OF COTS IN MISSION CRITICAL APPLICATIONS

    Lieutenant Colonel Joe Besselman

    Lieutenant Colonel Joe Besselman, System Program Director, Global Combat Support System – Air Force, US Air Force

  • Custom vs COTS in Mission critical applications
  • Where are COTS exploited today?
  • Problems with COTS-based products in the Air Force
  • Cost effective mission reliability using COTS
  • Types of COTS-based systems
  • Lessons learnt
  • 9:40 OBSOLESCENCE ISSUES

    Lieutenant Commander Jeremy Franks

    Lieutenant Commander Jeremy Franks, CTS, ILS Head of Specialisation, Obsolescence Management, Ministry of Defence, UK

  • The consequences of ignoring obsolescence
  • Operational risks over the lifecycle associated with obsolescence
  • Obsolescence strategy and management plans
  • Obsolescence management tools
  • Special considerations for COTS
  • 10:20 LINKING RELIABILITY AND OBSOLESCENCE WITH COTS ELECTRONICS

    Ted Smith

    Ted Smith, Technical Manager, Enterprise Formation Department / Director , Complex Managed Services / QinetiQ Technology Extension Corporation, Corona USA /National Obsolescence Centre, UK

  • Why link reliability prediction and obsolescence management?
  • New technology - new failure modes in COTS components
  • The evolution of proactive obsolescence and reliability health management
  • Real time reliability prediction
  • Life consumption monitoring
  • Future systems design concepts to mitigate the risk of the decreasing time to COTS obsolescence
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 COTS PRODUCTS IN THE DEFENCE INDUSTRY

    Mark Hughes

    Mark Hughes, Principal Pre-sales Consultant, IFS Defence

  • Can COTS products be used in defence?
  • Ruggedisation and maintenance of a COTS product
  • Use of 'component based' COTS products
  • Case study on the Bowman Logistic Information System (BLIS)
  • 12:00 CHALLENGES AND RISKS OF INTEGRATING COTS TECHNOLOGY IN MILITARY COMMUNICATIONS

    Dr Peter Stenumgaard

    Dr Peter Stenumgaard, Deputy Head of Communication Systems Department, Division of Command & Control Systems, Swedish Defence Research Agency

  • The current situation versus the vision
  • Challenges and risks with COTS in military applications
  • Example 1: - intersystem interference Risks due to COTS-products
  • Example 2: - 3G-wireless technology in military applications
  • 12:40 Networking Lunch

    13:40 SECURITY ISSUES IN USING COTS SOFTWARE AND HARDWARE

    Tom McCutcheon

    Tom McCutcheon, Senior Scientist, Computers, Information & Signal Processing (CISP), Defence Science and Technology Laboratories, Ministry of Defence, UK

  • Security issues relevant to High Assurance Systems such as Integrated Modular Avionics (IMA)
  • Dependability in large complex networks
  • Dependability in a Networked Enabled Capability (NEC) environment
  • Future issues
  • 14:20 COTS IN BATTLEFIELD DIGITISATION

    Lieutenant Colonel (Ret’d), Richard Hoare, MBE

    Lieutenant Colonel (Ret’d), Richard Hoare, MBE, Director, Business Development, DRS Tactical Systems

  • COTS-based UK BOWMAN program hardware
  • COTS-based US Army digitization program hardware (FBCB2 & MTS)
  • COTS-based rugged handheld computers for military applications
  • COTS-based rugged displays and thin client terminals
  • Future COTS ruggedisation
  • 15:00 IMPLICATIONS OF THE USE OF SOFTWARE COMPONENTS

    Michael Looney

    Michael Looney, Senior Research Fellow, University of Portsmouth

  • The development process is different if software components are used
  • The main stages in this new development paradigm are not the same as we have applied in the past
  • The basic time line has changed in terms of the order of activities
  • This impacts the task of managing the development
  • This leads to implications on the MoD’s present procurement approach
  • 15:40 Afternoon Tea

    16:00 COTS FOR INTRA-VEHICLE COMMUNICATIONS

    Peter Gardiner

    Peter Gardiner, Director of European Sales, Condor Engineering

  • Ruggedisation of COTS communication interface cards
  • One approach to component obsolescence management and reducing design risk - Down-loadable interface CORES for programmable devices
  • COTS implementation case example
  • 16:40 SOFTWARE MAINTENANCE IN COTS BASED SYSTEMS

    Judy Clapp

    Judy Clapp, Assistant to the Director of IT, Air Force Center, The MITRE Corporation

  • What is COTS software? Why use it?
  • What are the technical and business risks?
  • Managing the risks throughout the lifecycle
  • The lifecycle of COTS software in a software-intensive system
  • 17:20 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

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    Workshops

    Qualifying COTS to MIL-SPEC Requirements
    Workshop

    Qualifying COTS to MIL-SPEC Requirements

    London Marriott Hotel Grosvenor Square
    17th October 2003
    London, United Kingdom

    Cost effective methods for ensuring reliable PEMS in weapons systems
    Workshop

    Cost effective methods for ensuring reliable PEMS in weapons systems

    London Marriott Hotel Grosvenor Square
    17th October 2003
    London, United Kingdom

    London Marriott Hotel Grosvenor Square

    Grosvenor Square
    London W1K 6JP
    United Kingdom

    London Marriott Hotel Grosvenor Square

    HOTEL BOOKING FORM

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

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