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This conference will inform delegates of the latest developments in international indirect fire support policy and capability. It will examine the role of indirect fire in the current political climate, looking at the future defence policy requirements and demonstrate how these are being met. Lessons learned from current operational experiences in Iraq will be discussed, identifying the key challenges to indirect fire support advancement.

This event will analyse the latest developments in missile systems, concentrating on the need for higher efficiency of systems and the higher protection of personnel. Therefore advancements in command and control, precision weaponry, deployability, logistical support and simulation systems will all feature highly in the conference agenda. As armed forces place a heavy emphasis on the importance of limiting collateral effects each of these technological developments will continue to play a large part in future Indirect Fire Support research programs.

This year's Indirect Fire Conference will be our biggest to date.

We look forward to welcoming our top-class speaker panel that includes experts from:

  • US Army
  • US Marine Corps
  • UK Ministry of Defence
  • British Army
  • Dutch Army
  • South African Army

Plus,

  • A Briefing on the UK's capability needs and the processes needed to achieve them
  • USMC briefing on supporting ship to objective manoeuvres
  • Lessons learned from recent conflict zones
  • New concepts and developments in fire support

This event will provide you with all the information you need to enhance your indirect fire capabilities. You will learn how to:

  • Meet changing defence policy requirements
  • Evaluate the needs of the US, UK, French, Swedish, German, Dutch, South African and other forces
  • Assess emerging operational requirements across the world's major forces
  • Increase combat power, reduce logistical burdens and reduce collateral damage with precision systems
  • Assess the latest developments in modern artillery systems
  • Evaluate new technologies in naval firepower
  • Identify the key developments in future cannon and mortar munitions
  • Extend range and improve precision attack capabilities

A unique opportunity to learn from leading industry experts including:

  • Colonel Nathaniel Sledge, Project Manager, Combat Ammunition Systems, US Army
  • Colonel SJF Kruger, Senior Staff Officer Force Preparations, South African National Defence Force
  • Commander Nigel Langhorn, Defence Surface Warfare, Ministry of Defence, Royal Navy
  • Lieutenant Colonel Harry Konings, Chief, Plans and Policy Branch, Training Centre for Fire Support RNLA
  • Lieutenant Colonel Simon Hall, SO1 NEC, DEC Deep Target Attack, Ministry of Defence, UK
  • Major Dwayne Hynes, Field Artillery Threat Integration Staff Officer, US Army
  • Major David Kernohan, SO2 Indirect Fire Precision Attack, Future Artillery Weapons Systems Integrated Project Team, DPA, Ministry of Defence, UK
  • Major Christopher Tavuchis, Indirect Fire Capabilities Officer, Materiel Capabilities Division, Marine Corps Combat Development Command
  • Peter Burke, Chief, Precision Effects Branch, Office of the Product Manager (OPM) Mortar Systems, US Army
  • Stephen Ashlin, Capability Leader, Indirect Fire Rocket Systems, Surface Weapon Systems, QinetiQ

Key issues that will be addressed:

  • INDIRECT FIRE PRESENT AND FUTURE: Hear the latest developments from the British Army, US Marine Corps, US Army, Royal Navy, Royal Netherlands Army and the South African Army
  • MUNITIONS TRANSFORMATION: Discover the latest improvements in precision, accuracy, range and lethality
  • PRECISION ATTACK: Understand the UK’s extended range attack capability
  • COUNTER BATTERY RADARS: Gain an insight into the operational experiences and lessons learned from Iraq and Afghanistan
  • KEY INDUSTRY PERSONNEL: Meet the leaders in the field, make valuable contacts and learn from their experience and expertise

Conference programme

8:30 Registration & Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Colonel SJF Kruger

Colonel SJF Kruger, Senior Staff Officer Force Preparations, South African National Defence Force

9:10 USMC INDIRECT FIRE SUPPORT CAPABILITIES

Major Christopher Tavuchis

Major Christopher Tavuchis, Indirect Fire Capabilities Officer, Materiel Capabilities Division, Marine Corps Combat Development Command

  • Operational concepts
  • Current capabilities
  • Future capabilities
  • 9:50 INDIRECT FIRE IN 2025

    Stephen Ashlin

    Stephen Ashlin, Capability Leader, Indirect Fire Rocket Systems, Surface Weapon Systems, QinetiQ

  • DTA vision
  • Political, military, technological context
  • Effects, information and the IF system
  • Use of scenario-based process to link military objectives to tactical effects
  • 10:30 Morning Coffee

    11:00 FIRE SUPPORT – THE FUTURE

    Commander Nigel Langhorn

    Commander Nigel Langhorn, Defence Surface Warfare, Ministry of Defence, Royal Navy

  • History of naval fire support
  • Today’s requirement
  • Present capability
  • Future aspirations
  • 11:40 SOUTH AFRICAN LONG RANGE ARTILLERY

    Colonel SJF Kruger

    Colonel SJF Kruger, Senior Staff Officer Force Preparations, South African National Defence Force

  • A recent historical perspective on the development of South African long range artillery
  • Tactical significance of long range artillery
  • South African artillery doctrine of fighting with fire power
  • Accuracy and dispersion in long range artillery
  • 12:20 Networking Lunch

    13:50 OPERATIONS WITH COUNTER BATTERY RADARS

  • Operations
  • Missions, command and control
  • Deployment
  • Local protection
  • Logistics
  • Summary
  • Bård Frostad

    Bård Frostad, Product Manager, Weapon Locating Radar, Ericsson Microwave Systems

    Jan-Olov Winnberg

    Jan-Olov Winnberg, Programme Director, Ground Based Radars, Ericsson Microwave Systems

    14:30 ANALYSIS OF FIRE SUPPORT SYSTEMS

    Jeremy Smith

    Jeremy Smith, Senior Lecturer, Cranfield University, Royal Military College of Science

  • Overview of issues over analysis of fire support systems
  • Outline of techniques for fire support systems analysis
  • Use of simulation for analysis
  • Example studies
  • 15:10 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 A SYSTEM OF SYSTEMS APPROACH TO EFFECTS-BASED OPERATIONS

    Gavin Kilgour

    Gavin Kilgour, Business Area Manager, Weapon Systems, SCS David Reid, Senior Consultant Trials, Safety and Environmental, SCS

  • Effector planning
  • Platform planning
  • Intelligence and targeting
  • Effects and STA co-ordination
  • ‘Joined-up’ procurement to support and sustain EBO
  • 16:20 THE NEAR FUTURE OF TUBED ARTILLERY

    Gerald Lefebvre

    Gerald Lefebvre, Business Development – UK and Germany, GIAT Industries

  • Weapon system: CAESAR
  • Smart shells: SPACIDO, IMPAQT, BONUS
  • IM shells: LU211-M
  • 17:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-registration & Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Lieutenant Colonel David Lowles

    Lieutenant Colonel David Lowles, Chief Instructor Targets, Royal School of Artillery, Royal Artillery

    9:10 KEYNOTE ADDRESS

    Colonel Nathaniel Sledge

    Colonel Nathaniel Sledge, Project Manager Combat Ammunition Systems, United States Army

  • Fire support munitions must transform as the Army transforms
  • Fire support munitions transformation is primarily characterized by improvements in precision, accuracy, range and lethality
  • For a robust indirect fire suite, scalable precision is as important as any specific precision capability
  • PM CAS’ key transformation products are Excalibur, PGMM, course correcting fuzes, mortar fire control system, advanced cannon artillery ammunition program and sensor-fuzed munitions
  • PM CAS other initiatives include self-destruct fuzes, multi-option fuzes, light-weight 81mm mortar, modular artillery charge system, M864 DIPCM recap, support to NLOS-M armament development, and embedded ball technology for mortars
  • There are many enabling technologies that are necessary to support the modernization of cannon artillery and mortars
  • 9:50 SPECIAL ADDRESS

    Peter Burke

    Peter Burke, Chief, Precision Effects Branch, Office of the Product Manager (OPM) Mortar Systems, US Army

  • Responsive precision fires in close combat are required on today’s battlefield
  • PGMM is following an incremental development strategy in response to the Army customer’s requirements
  • Benefits include increased combat power, reduced logistics burden and reduced collateral damage
  • PGMM will leverage other mortar performance improvements in weapons and fire control
  • 10:30 Morning Coffee

    11:00 THE BRIGADE FIRE SUPPORT SYSTEM

    Lieutenant Colonel Harry Konings

    Lieutenant Colonel Harry Konings, Chief, Plans and Policy Branch, Training Centre for Fire Support RNLA

  • National and international developments
  • The PzH2000NL artillery battalion
  • Fire support co-ordination: focus on the future forward observer
  • Target acquisition and ISTAR
  • C4I aspects
  • Fire support for the Air Manoeuvre Brigade
  • 11:40 THREAT INTEGRATION INTO ACQUISITION

    Major Dwayne Hynes

    Major Dwayne Hynes, Field Artillery Threat Integration Staff Officer, US Army
    View Bio

  • Artillery threats
  • Proliferation of precision munitions and countermeasures
  • Overview of threat integration into US Army acquisition
  • Major Dwayne Hynes, Field Artillery Threat Integration Staff Officer, US Army
  • 12:20 Networking Lunch

    13:50 THE JOINT EFFECTS TACTICAL TARGETING SYSTEM

    Major Steve  Frazer

    Major Steve Frazer, C4I Projects and Requirements Manager, MOD Abbey Wood

  • A significant gap exists in the Land Component Commander’s ability to deliver synchronised joint effects into the battlespace.
  • The current tactical targeting process is reliant on inefficient manual procedures that act as a major drag on operational tempo.
  • The Joint Effects Tactical Targeting System (JETTS) programme will provide a set of software tools designed to enable the synchronised delivery of joint integrated lethal and non-lethal effects into the Land Component Commander’s volume of the battlespace.
  • Acquisition of JETTS is incremental, through a number of discreet capability milestones, co-ordinated with Command and Battlespace Management (Land) CBM(L) delivery
  • JETTS represents a significant step towards NEC and the achievement of the requirement for fully integrated Joint Fires capability espoused by Defence Strategic Guidance Paper 2003
  • 14:30 UK INDIRECT FIRE PRECISION ATTACK PROGRAMME

    Major David Kernohan

    Major David Kernohan, SO2 Indirect Fire Precision Attack, Future Artillery Weapons Systems Integrated Project Team, DPA, Ministry of Defence, UK

  • Providing the UK with an extended range precision attack capability
  • Contracting for capability
  • Incremental acquisition
  • Loitering munitions – a step change in capability
  • 15:10 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 TARGETING AND INDIRECT FIRE SYSTEMS

    Lieutenant Colonel David Lowles

    Lieutenant Colonel David Lowles, Chief Instructor Targets, Royal School of Artillery, Royal Artillery

  • UK land targeting overview
  • Kill chain development
  • Battlespace management issues
  • Indirect fire support capabilities in peace support operations
  • 16:20 NON-LINE OF SIGHT – LAUNCH SYSTEMS

  • Technology demonstration results and transition
  • Operational vignettes of NLOS-LS for US Army
  • Key operational and technical requirements
  • Programme status
  • Wendi Weave

    Wendi Weave, Assistant Programme Manager for Integration, NLOS Tactical Missiles

    17:00 PRECISION ENGAGEMENT IN THE SWEDISH NBD

  • FOI research organisation and activities
  • Precision engagement of small land targets (research project)
  • Critical technologies
  • The way ahead
  • Magnus Sparf

    Magnus Sparf, Deputy Project Manager, FOI Systems Technology

    Lars Forssell

    Lars Forssell, Senior Research Officer, FOI

    17:40 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

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