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The 3rd in SMi’s Vehicle Survivability series will address the nature of future land operations and how enhancing the survivability of land platforms contributes towards the realisation of new operational concepts. Attention will be paid to the upgrading of current platforms, as well as revealing new design concepts with integrated survivability features.

Government policies on vehicle survivability will be examined, demonstrating the new emphasis now being placed on vulnerability reduction and personnel safety. Identifying the specific threats through operational perspectives the conference will then analyse the current ability of vehicles to counter this threat on the battlefield.

Advancements in technology will be discussed, looking in particular at the areas of Signature Management, Active, Energetic and Passive Armor Development, Damage Reduction Technologies, Electro-Optic Countermeasure Technology and Survivability Optimisation Modelling and Systems Analyses. An overview of future developments in vehicle survivability will provide possible solutions to the challenges faced by vehicle designers, giving expert opinion on how best to combat vulnerability.

The distinguished panel of expert speakers at Vehicle Survivability in Future Ground Manoeuvre includes:
  • Colonel Jeff Terhune, TRADOC Systems Manager for Close Combat Missiles, US Army
  • Lieutenant Colonel Roddy Lee, SO1 Concept Development and Experimentation (Land), Ministry of Defence, UK
  • Lieutenant Colonel John Hinds, Product Manager, Unit of Action Special Programs, US Army
  • Lieutenant Colonel Jim Ryan, Acting Director, Force Development Group, Land Warfare Centre, Australia 
  • Major David Bardorf, Project Officer, PM Tanks, Marine Corps Systems Command, US Marine Corps
  • Major Kirk Stone, SO2 Dimounted Combat, Land Warfare Development Centre, Australia
  • Dr Paul Ratcliff, Team Leader, Signatures, Dstl, Ministry of Defence, UK
  • Captain Marl McNeil, Director Land Requirements 3-3, Close Combat Systems (Armoured Fighting Section),  National Defence Headquarters, Canada
  • Stuart Dowling, Lecturer, Royal Military College of Science, Cranfield

Aims and Objectives of Vehicle Survivability in Future Ground Manoeuvre Include:

  • IDENTIFY the major threats to vehicle survivability on the battlefield and discover how best to counter them
  • ANALYSE current vehicles being used in operation, focusing on their vulnerabilities
  • LEARN from leading experts on the advancements being made in survivability enhancement
  • EXAMINE technological developments in signature management and active armour
  • LEARN how survivability modelling and systems analysis can play a key role in optimising survivability

Conference programme

8:30 Registration & Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Professor Richard Ogorkiewicz

Professor Richard Ogorkiewicz, Visiting Professor, Defence Academy of the United Kingdom

9:10 Future Land Warfare

Lieutenant Colonel Roddy Lee

Lieutenant Colonel Roddy Lee, S01 Concept Development and Experimentation (Land), Directorate General Doctrine and Development, Ministry of Defence, UK

  • The key land future concepts
  • The notion of the Balanced Force
  • Concept to capability
  • The role of the concept experimentation to mitigate risk
  • Aspects of survivability
  • 9:50 Tomorrow's Land Force

    10:30 Morning Coffee

    11:00 The Future Combat System

    Lieutenant Colonel John Hinds

    Lieutenant Colonel John Hinds, Product Manager, Unit of Action Special Programs, US Army

  • Goals of the FCS system
  • Performance factors
  • Achieving survivability via network centric operations
  • 11:40 The UK's Future Land Force

    Alistair Roxborough

    Alistair Roxborough, , Ministry of Defence, UK

  • Creating a highly mobile, medium land force
  • The key drivers
  • Survivability implications of a ‘system of systems’
  • Challenges ahead
  • Summary
  • 12:20 Networking Lunch

    13:50 Complex Warfighting

  • Details to be confirmed
  • Lieutenant Colonel Jim Ryan

    Lieutenant Colonel Jim Ryan, Acting Director, Force Development Group, Land Warfare Development Centre, Australia

    Major Kirk Stone

    Major Kirk Stone, SO2 Dismounted Combat, Land Warfare Development Centre, Australia

    14:30 Defeating Survivability Enhancements

    Colonel Jeff Terhune

    Colonel Jeff Terhune, TRADOC Systems Manager for Close Combat Missiles, US Army

  • Line-Of-Sight Anti-Tank KE missile system
  • Compact Kinetic Energy Missile (CKEM)
  • Improvements in chemical energy missiles
  • Man-portable lethality against armour
  • 15:10 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 Armour Technology

    Gerald Lefebvre

    Gerald Lefebvre, Director, Business Development, GIAT Industries

  • An introduction to the VBCI programme
  • Anti-mine protection
  • Add-on armour protection
  • Performance in trials
  • Developments in add-on protection kits for armoured vehicles
  • Passive armour package
  • Reactive armour package
  • Anti-mine protection kit
  • 16:20 Meeting Modern Armour Requirements

    John Mayles

    John Mayles, Vice President, Business Development, Aerospace and Defense Group, Armor Holdings

  • The role of the contractor
  • Achieving low-cost high-value armour solutions
  • Logistical challenges – meeting demand
  • Combat theatre performance
  • New developments
  • 17:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Registration & Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Professor Richard Ogorkiewicz

    Professor Richard Ogorkiewicz, Visiting Professor, Defence Academy of the United Kingdom

    9:10 Canadian Mobile Gun System Requirements

    Mark McNeil

    Mark McNeil, Director Land Requirements 3-3 (DAS Requirements), National Defense Headquarters

  • Canadian Mobile Gun System program
  • Canadian approach to survivability
  • Balancing essential requirements
  • Future requirements
  • 9:50 Future Weapons Platform Survivability

    10:30 Morning Coffee

    11:00 Panel Discussion

    Colonel Jeff Terhune

    Colonel Jeff Terhune, TRADOC Systems Manager for Close Combat Missiles, US Army

    Professor Richard Ogorkiewicz

    Professor Richard Ogorkiewicz, Visiting Professor, Defence Academy of the United Kingdom

    11:40 Multi-Spectral Smoke

    Stuart Dowling

    Stuart Dowling, Lecturer, Royal Military College Of Science, Cranfield

  • Principle of operation and relationship to DAS
  • Testing the new UK grenade
  • Some new ideas tried
  • The results and the conclusions
  • What is the value of multi spectral smoke as part of a DAS system?
  • 12:20 Networking Lunch

    13:50 Survivability for Land Platforms

    Dr Paul Ratcliff

    Dr Paul Ratcliff, Team Leader, Signatures, dstl, Ministry of Defence, UK

  • Operational constraints
  • Threat-driven requirements
  • Survivability contributors – technology, techniques and procedures
  • Assessing effectiveness
  • High level survivability balancing
  • 14:30 Ceramic Armor Systems

    John Cook

    John Cook, Director Armour Systems, CoorsTek

  • Details to be confirmed
  • 15:10 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 Electronic Warfare Technology

    Cobus van der Merwe

    Cobus van der Merwe, Business Development Executive: Land, AVITRONICS

  • APS system architecture
  • Tactical environment model
  • Tactical modelling of APS efficiency
  • Study results
  • Implications of results for future joint warfare
  • 16:20 Carbon Fibre Composites

    Dr Mark French

    Dr Mark French, Principal Engineer, QinetiQ

  • Introducing the ‘Plastic Tank’
  • Advantages
  • faster
  • lighter
  • lower signatures
  • Blast protection in comparison with traditional armour
  • Battle testing results
  • Implications for FRES and FLOC
  • The future – developing main battle tanks
  • 17:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

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    Workshops

    Radar Cross Section and Signature Management
    Workshop

    Radar Cross Section and Signature Management

    The Hatton, at etc. venues
    12th October 2005
    London, United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    51/53 Hatton Garden
    London EC1N 8HN
    United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

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