Home
overview

This conference will develop the idea of NCW, involving presentations looking at the theory and practice of NCW and its definition and role in the modern battlespace. It will also develop country-specific and service-specific visions from MoD/DoDs as to the direction of key developments. Development and implementation will be discussed by the more established countries, identifying specific initiatives and programs that have recently been implemented. Case Studies will help to add weight to the argument for developing NCW. Additionally, the conference will look at network architectures and commercial technologies and their applications. The overall conference will fall into the following major categories: Background, Visions, NCW Potential and Capability, Development and Implementation, Technologies and Applications.

The benefits of attending this two day intensive conference:
· EXPAND your knowledge of the notions and theories behind network enabled thinking
· GAIN invaluable insight into the status and developments of NCW concepts
· INCREASE your awareness of country-specific advances
· IDENTIFY the solutions behind successful NCW implementation
· INVESTIGATE emerging technologies and innovation
· MAXIMISE your networking opportunities in a globally attended learning forum

  • John Garstka, Assistant Director, Concepts and Operations, Office of Force Transformation, Office of the Secretary of Defense
  • Colonel (Ret’d) Fred Stein, Department Manager - C3 Battlefield Systems, Mitre Corporation
  • Dr David Alberts, Director, Research and Strategic Planning, OASD (C3I), US Department of Defense
  • John Caligari, Director Future Warfare Concepts, Department of Defence Australia
  • Captain Robert Whitkop, Deputy Director FORCEnet, Naval Network Warfare Command, US Navy
  • Colonel Geerlof Kanis, Head, C2 Support Center (C2SC), Royal Netherlands Defence Staff
  • Commander Tim Jara, Director, Network Centric Innovation Center
  • Professor Peter Brook, Head of the Integration Authority, Defence Procurement Agency, Ministry of Defence UK
  • Dr Tom Buckman, Chief, Policy, Concepts, Architecture Development and Strategy Planning, NATO C3 Agency
  • Dr Richard Hayes, President, Evidence Based Research
  • Lieutenant Colonel Per-Magnus Wicen, Head of Technical Centre of Expertise, Command & Control Support Systems, Swedish Defence Material Administration
  • “The international attendance and presentations at this conference more fully exposed the attendees to the global impact that the tenets of NCW are having around the world”
    Brian Burnett, PwC Consulting Engagement Manager, Network Centric Innovation Center

    Conference programme

    8:30 Registration and Coffee

    9:00 Moderator’s Opening Remarks

    John Garstka

    John Garstka, Assistant. Director, Concepts and Operations, Office of Force Transformation, Office of the Secretary of Defense

    9:10 NETWORK CENTRIC WARFARE DEFINED

  • Defence transformation and Network Centric Warfare
  • Basics of NCW - domains of warfare - tenets of Network Centric Warfare - conceptual framework for NCW - evolution of NCW capability
  • Evidence of competitive advantage - warfighting advantage - military operations - coalition effectiveness
  • Implications for C2 - command in the Information Age - control in the Information Age - organisation in the Information Age
  • Implementing NCW - key elements of strategy - mission capability packages - co-evolution of MCPs
  • Key implementation challenges
  • John Garstka

    John Garstka, Assistant. Director, Concepts and Operations, Office of Force Transformation, Office of the Secretary of Defense

    Colonel (Ret'd) Fred Stein

    Colonel (Ret'd) Fred Stein , Department Manager, C3 Battlefield Systems, Mitre Corporation

    Dr David Alberts

    Dr David Alberts, Director, Research and Strategic Planning, OASD (N11), US Department of Defense

    10:55 AN EXTENDED Q&A SESSION ON THE FUNDAMENTALS OF NCW

    John Garstka

    John Garstka, Assistant. Director, Concepts and Operations, Office of Force Transformation, Office of the Secretary of Defense

  • Understand clearly the concept and requirements of NCW
  • Focus on the detailed aspects of networked thinking
  • Recognise the considerations of NCW implementation
  • Weigh up the advantages of a networked approach
  • Identify the risks and challenges
  • 11:20 Morning Coffee

    11:40 CAPABILITY INTEGRATION AND ACQUISITION

    Professor Peter Brook

    Professor Peter Brook, Head of the Integration Authority, Defence Procurement Agency, Ministry of Defence UK

  • The challenges of project integration
  • Foreseeing the nature of the architectural battlespace - the feasibility of existing structures - the requirements of future organisation - project innovation - risks to be considered
  • Constructing the network model
  • Enabling a fully network-interoperable expeditionary force
  • 12:20 THE NATO VISION OF NETWORK ENABLED COLLECTIVE SECURITY

    Dr Tom Buckman

    Dr Tom Buckman, Chief, Policy, Concepts, Architecture Development and Strategy Planning, NATO C3 Agency

  • Guidance from heads of state for adopting the tenets of NCW
  • The NATO vision of Network Enabled Collective Security (NECS)
  • Co-evolving a NATO Joint Vision and C3 System Vision for 2018
  • NECS Capability enablers, capability goals and their impact on NATO C3 procurement activities
  • The impact of new national and multinational procurement activities in realising the vision of NECS
  • NATO Consultation and Effects Based Operations
  • The critical role of information management in coalition operations
    Current NATO initiatives related to NECS
  • 13:00 Networking Lunch

    14:00 SWEDEN – NETWORK BASED DEFENCE

  • The Swedish model
  • Improvements to the Swedish defence capacity
  • Implementation strategies of the NCW concept
  • Problems foreseen and those actually encountered
  • Lessons learned and considerations for the future
  • Lieutenant Colonel Per-Magnus Wicen

    Lieutenant Colonel Per-Magnus Wicen, Head of Technical Centre of Expertise, Command & Control Support Systems, Swedish Defence Material Administration

    Major Torsten Bernstrom

    Major Torsten Bernstrom, Department Head, Command and Control Systems, Swedish Defence Material Administration

    14:40 NETWORK CENTRIC OPERATIONS IN THE NETHERLANDS ARMED FORCES

    Colonel Geerlof Kanis

    Colonel Geerlof Kanis, Head, C2 Support Center (C2SC), Royal Netherlands Defence Staff

  • Dependence on an ability to employ information and its associated technology
  • Emphasis on information superiority and full spectrum dominance
  • Improving the interoperability, adaptability, and flexibility of information systems
  • Migrating to the latest innovative technologies
  • Budget management
  • 15:20 UTILISING COMPLEX ADAPTIVE SYSTEM (CAS) TECHNOLOGY FOR NETWORK CENTRIC WARFARE TO ACHIEVE OPERATIONAL RESILIENCE AND FLEXIBILITY

    Dr David Stupples

    Dr David Stupples, Senior Partner/Professor of Systems Science, PA Consulting Group/City University, London

  • Difficulty in achieving mission critical system status with current planned evolution towards NCW
  • How CAS technology can achieve and maintain mission critical status
  • Harmonising emerging NCW designs with CAS concepts
  • Building new adaptive NCW systems for future military operations
  • 16:00 Afternoon Tea

    16:20 INNOVATION WITHIN THE UK DEFENCE STRUCTURE

    John Turton

    John Turton, IPT Leader, Theatre and Formations Communications Systems , Defence Procurement Agency, Ministry of Defence UK

  • The development of future systems – structural requirements
  • Roles and requirements of modern war fighting forces
  • Solutions offered - FALCON - PTARMIGAN - CORMORANT
  • Evolution and implementation – risks and considerations
  • Facing modern challenges identified in the latest warfare scenarios.
  • Innovation
  • 17:00 LEVERAGING HUMAN CAPITAL FOR MASS EFFECTS

    Bill Vass

    Bill Vass, Vice President of Corporate Software Services, Information Technology, Sun Microsystems

  • The cultural, doctrinal, operational and digital divide
  • Optimising natural capacity in unnatural worlds
  • Utilising the social network to exploit the technology network
  • What is the weakest link?
  • 17:40 Moderator’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    9:00 Moderator's Opening Remarks

    Brigadier (Ret’d) David Lynam

    Brigadier (Ret’d) David Lynam, Deputy Director UK Programmes / Former Director Equipment Capability CCII, Lockheed Martin Mission Systems UK/Ministry of Defence UK

    9:00 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:10 THE NAVAL VISION

    Captain Robert Whitkop

    Captain Robert Whitkop, Deputy Director FORCEnet, Naval Network Warfare Command, US Navy

  • The navy as the prime advocate of network centric capability
  • NCW’s relevance to the naval war-fighting structure
  • FORCEnet’s integration framework
  • Problems investigated and solutions offered through FORCEnet - effective networking of modern battlespace - enhanced combat power - determining requirements
  • Taking NCW to the future level
  • 9:45 NCW: THE AUSTRALIAN PERSPECTIVE

    John Caligari

    John Caligari, Director Future Warfare Concepts, Department of Defence Australia

  • The development of the ADF’s NCW concept
  • The function of NCW in future war-fighting
  • The role of concept development and experimentation
  • Implementing NCW
  • 10:20 NETWORK ENABLED CAPABILITY – THE UK VISION

    Speaker to be confirmed

    Speaker to be confirmed, , Ministry of Defence

  • Key drivers
  • K effects based operations (EBO) research
  • US Network Centric Warfare initiative
  • Key differences between NEC and NCW
  • capability
  • operational context
  • - framework
  • Key NEC themes
  • information
  • shared awareness
  • - effects – flexibility, synchronisation, planning - support - acquisition
  • Delivering NEC
  • research
  • acquisition
  • - experimentation - concepts and doctrine - key players
  • Aspirations for the future
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 THE TRANSFORMATION PROCESS

    Speaker to be confirmed

    Speaker to be confirmed, , Network Centric Innovation Center

  • Requirements and strategy for moving toward a network enabled force
  • Integrating experimentation with the co-evolution of network centric mission capability packages
  • Objectives for the development of NCW - knowledge management - optimisation of information flow - additional opportunities for innovation
  • Change agents - close interaction with operators
  • Identifying innovation - sustaining versus disrupting innovation - potential innovative technologies
  • 12:00 INNOVATION AND TRANSFER

    Kevin Laudano

    Kevin Laudano, Partner, Accenture

  • The commercial experience of transformation
  • DoD – delivering a roadmap for change
  • Key lessons and implications for Defence and Industry
  • 12:40 PANEL DISCUSSION: NETWORK ENABLED CAPABILITY VERSUS NETWORK CENTRIC WARFARE

    John Garstka

    John Garstka, Assistant. Director, Concepts and Operations, Office of Force Transformation, Office of the Secretary of Defense

    Brigadier (Ret’d) David Lynam

    Brigadier (Ret’d) David Lynam, Deputy Director UK Programmes / Former Director Equipment Capability CCII, Lockheed Martin Mission Systems UK/Ministry of Defence UK

    13:00 Networking Lunch

    14:00 APPLICATION OF NCW CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK

    Dr Richard Hayes

    Dr Richard Hayes, President, Evidence Based Research

  • Evolution of the conceptual framework
  • Defining key relationships between the physical, information, cognitive and social domains
  • Key variables, attributes and metrics
  • Application of the framework to case studies and applications
  • 14:40 EDUCATION AND TRAINING AS THE KEY TO SUCCESSFUL IMPLEMENTATION

    Sandy Babcock

    Sandy Babcock, Advanced Concept Team Leader Canadian Forces Experimentation Centre, Department of National Defence, Canada

  • Planning, exercising and fighting using new doctrine
  • Appropriate training methods / approaches
  • Constructing a future model for developing network centric, knowledge-based skills training for the warrior
  • Tactics development
  • Simulators and mobile-training
  • 15:20 COALITION C4I ARCHITECTURES DESIGNED TO SUPPORT NETWORK CENTRIC SUBMARINE WARFARE

  • Requirements for Coalition Subsurface Tactical Knowledge Management
  • SNWM architecture feasible through the use of Syntactic and Semantic Technology
  • Review of Decision Support System Design
  • Intelligent Agent employment to potentially achieve a Semantic Network Warfare capability
  • Application of a Tactical Knowledge Management Environment under a sample Coalition Operational Subsurface scenario
  • George McCarty

    George McCarty, Division Head, Submarine Communications and C4I Systems, SPAWAR, US Department of Defense

    Andrew Sutherland

    Andrew Sutherland, Technical Manager Maritime C4I, DSTL, Ministry of Defence UK

    16:00 Afternoon Tea

    16:20 COALITION INTEROPERABILITY IN NETWORK

    Jonathan Hudson

    Jonathan Hudson, Technical Manager, Northrop

  • Interoperability issues
  • The concepts of push(tm) and pull(tm) data exchanges in the emerging COE
  • The role of web services as COE 4 migrates to NCES
  • Architecture proposed for NCES (and their challenges)
  • The effect on interoperability and doctrine
  • 17:00 INTELLIGENT NETWORK CENTRIC WARFARE WITH MODELLING AND SIMULATION

    Donald Renner II

    Donald Renner II, Director, Federal Solutions, OPNET

    17:40 Moderator's Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

    +

    Workshops

    The Human Aspects of Network Centric Warfare
    Workshop

    The Human Aspects of Network Centric Warfare

    One Whitehall Place
    1st October 2003
    London, United Kingdom

    Methods and Technologies for Network Based Defence Research
    Workshop

    Methods and Technologies for Network Based Defence Research

    One Whitehall Place
    1st October 2003
    London, United Kingdom

    One Whitehall Place

    Westminster
    London SW1A 2HD
    United Kingdom

    One Whitehall Place

    HOTEL BOOKING FORM

    Title

    SubTitle
    speaker image

    Content


    Title


    Description

    Download


    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

    Event Title

    Headline

    Text
    Read More

    I would like to speak at an event

    I would like to attend an event

    I would like to sponsor/exhibit at an event

    SIGN UP OR LOGIN

    Sign up
    Forgotten Password?

    Contact SMi GROUP LTD

    UK Office
    Opening Hours: 9.00 - 17.30 (local time)
    SMi Group Ltd, 1 Westminster Bridge Road, London, SE1 7XW, United Kingdom
    Tel: +44 (0) 20 7827 6000 Fax: +44 (0) 20 7827 6001
    Website: http://www.smi-online.co.uk Email: events@smi-online.co.uk
    Registered in England No: 3779287 VAT No: GB 976 2951 71




    Forgotten Password

    Please enter the email address you registered with. We will email you a new password.