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Following on from the success of last year’s UAV & UCAV Payloads conference we are once again bringing together the international specialists within the UAV field and tackling the issues that matter. UAV & UCAV Payloads II offers a unique opportunity to hear from a leading international panel of speakers at the cutting edge of UAV and UCAV payload development.

Conference programme

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Lieutenant Colonel Nick Hubberstey

Lieutenant Colonel Nick Hubberstey, SO1 ISTAR, UK Ministry of Defence

9:10 KEYNOTE ADDRESS

Lieutenant Colonel Paul Geier

Lieutenant Colonel Paul Geier, Chief Combat Applications Division, UAV Battlelab US Air Force

  • An overview of UAV Battlelab mission, visions, organisation and process
  • Active SEAD: concept - use UAVs to perform all aspects of non-lethal SEAD
  • Spotter UAV - Laser illuminate night close air support targets
  • Predator Geo-reference: concept - combine predator video with national imagery to get GPS targeting quality co-ordinated
  • Comm relay: concept - use an UAV for a JTIDS/Comm relay to extend line of sight distances
  • 9:40 UAV AND SENSOR-TO-SHOOTER DEVELOPMENTS

    Dave Hutber

    Dave Hutber, Project LIGHTNING Battlelab, DERA

  • An overview of current UAV and payload technical developments
  • The Project LIGHTNING Battlelab and its involvement with UAVs
  • Modelling elements of the UAV and the C3I harness in a synthetic environment
  • Progressive derisking: Plugging in a UAV and other assets to the system
  • Future experiments involving the Battlelab
  • 10:20 ARMY PAYLOAD REQUIREMENTS

    Colonel William Knarr

    Colonel William Knarr, TSM UAV Office, US Army Intelligence Centre

  • Describe Army UAV CONOPS
  • Relate Army UAV payload requirements (for all UAV systems)
  • Describe needed industry technologies to fulfill payload requirements
  • Discuss UAV payload processing and reporting of information to users
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 MODULAR UAV PAYLOADS

    Trevor Wright

    Trevor Wright, Project Manager for UAV Payloads, Matra Marconi Space

  • Overview of typical payloads requirements
  • Illustration of a multifunctional sensor controller
  • Implementation of a SAR payload
  • Implementation of a datalink
  • Future developments of multisensor controller
  • 12:00 NAVAL UAV PAYLOAD DEVELOPMENTS

    Leonard Parrish

    Leonard Parrish, Naval Air Warfare Center UAV Project Coordinator, US Navy

  • Current US Navy Operational requirements for UAVs
  • Proof of concept demonstrations (recent, current, and planned in the near future)
  • RandD, system integration, and test resources
  • An invitation and challenge
  • 12:40 Lunch

    14:00 PAST AND FUTURE TACTICAL PAYLOAD ACTIVITIES

    Jim Christner

    Jim Christner, Director, International Operations Defense Systems, AAI Corporation

  • Overview of the Pioneer tactical combat operations payload
  • Discussion and lessons learned regarding the integration of over 20 tactical payloads into Pioneer and Shadow UAV platforms
  • Problems surrounding selecting and integrating new payloads
  • Realistic uses of tactical UAV payloads in the future
  • 14:40 PAYLOADS REQUIREMENTS FOR EMERGING LONG ENDURANCE UAVS

    John Sharkey

    John Sharkey, ERAST Program Manager, NASA Dryden Flight Research Center

  • An update of the latest developments in payloads for the ERAST platforms
  • An update of the latest developments in payloads for the ERAST platforms ERAST platform capabilities
  • The opportunity for greater payload capabilities
  • Multi-functional opportunities
  • The operational requirement of UAVs for the 21st century
  • 15:20 Afternoon tea

    15:40 PAYLOAD INTEGRATION

    Walt Whitesides

    Walt Whitesides, UAV/UCAV Programs, TASC

  • An overview of the challenges facing UAV to UCAV payload developers in response to emerging battlefield scenarios
  • Meeting the operational requirements of the US Armed Forces - how will the UCAV fit into the overall battlespace architecture?
  • How are the payloads effectively integrated into UAV platforms? What are the difficulties of changing from UAV payload integration to UCAV payload integration?
  • Smoothing the transition - the role of modelling and simulation in moving from UAV integrated payloads to UCAV payloads
  • 16:20 CASE STUDY

    Christophe Corizzi

    Christophe Corizzi, President and General Manager, CAC Systemes

  • Concept of operation of the system
  • Rapid deployment
  • Mobile and discreet
  • Multi-sensors - multi-missions
  • Concept of design of the system
  • Modular and easy to use Low acquisition cost Small crew Low life cycle cost Actual FOX-MCLS status
  • 17:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    17:10 Informal drinks reception

    8:30 Re-registration and coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Bruce Avery

    Bruce Avery, Executive Director, Precision Strike Association

    9:10 CASE STUDY: GLOBAL HAWK UAV

    James Coates

    James Coates, Global Hawk Chief Engineer, US Air Force

  • Global Hawk system overview
  • Military requirement
  • Business approach
  • Advanced concept demonstration
  • Acquisition reform initiatives
  • Development/test results
  • 9:40 UAV/UCAV AND SENSOR-TO-SHOOTER DEVELOPMENTS

    Mark Storer

    Mark Storer, Advanced Programs (Sensor-to-shooter Projects) Manager, Marconi Information Systems

  • An overview of current UAV/UCAVs and payload developments for the US Department of Defense
  • Advanced mission planning systems for UAVs - maximising the potential of UAV payloads and increasing the survivability of the aircraft
  • Targeting and imagery intelligence system developments discussed
  • UCAV prototyping developments - case study reviews
  • Global Hawk and Predator mission planning system - success in operation
  • 10:20 ISR MISSION AREA PLAN (MAP) PROCESS UPDATE

    Dennis F Ogorzaly

    Dennis F Ogorzaly, Senior Program Analyst, Sensors and Platforms Division, Aerospace Command Control Intelligence Surveillance Reconnaissance Center

  • Defining the requirements
  • The strategy-to-task process
  • The definition process:
  • Mission area assessment
  • Mission needs analysis
  • The deficiency/solution process Analysing the proposed solutions
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 MICRO UAV PAYLOADS

    William Devine

    William Devine, Business Development Manager, Sanders

  • An overview of the challenges in incorporating payloads into a micro UAV
  • The aims and objectives for micro UAVs - their role in the future battlespace
  • Micro UAV payload technology
  • Chemical sensors Camera technology Infra-red sensors
  • How are the payloads miniaturised and incorporated?
  • What are the operational benefits of micro UAVs Future micro UAV payload developments
  • 12:00 TACTICAL DATA LINKS (TDL)

    John Wilde and Perry Jago

    John Wilde and Perry Jago, Director Air Traffic Management and Senior Consultant, C4I, STASYS

  • Background
  • The need for flexible use of airspace
  • The need to ensure safe passage for all airspace users
  • The need to avoid fratricide
  • The use of L16 for real-time Command and Control (C2)
  • The strengths and benefits of L16The use of L16 to overcome integration difficulties The distribution of operational information to friendly forces The provision of situational awareness Potential use of L16 for dissemination of mission product The provision of secure, survivable, interoperable data transmission to a wide range of users
  • 12:40 Lunch

    14:00 HUMAN FACTORS

    Captain Angus Rupert, MD PhD

    Captain Angus Rupert, MD PhD, Flight Surgeon, Medical Corps, US Navy

  • A review of aerospace human factor interfaces
  • How do human factor interfaces apply to spatial orientation and situation awareness
  • The reason for past failures
  • A novel man-machine-interface - the Tactile Situation Awareness System (TSAS)
  • Data demonstrating the effectiveness of TSAS in the control of aerospace vehicles while reducing workloads
  • Likely future developments involving the TSAS program
  • 14:40 INTELLIGENT FLIGHT CONTROLS

    Robert Pap

    Robert Pap, President, Accurate Automation Corporation

  • An overview of the technology involved in neural flight controls
  • Flight tests of the LoFlyte and the problems that arise
  • Potential developments in neural flight controls
  • How is the payload effectively integrated into the UAV platform?
  • The future of the UAV payload development programs
  • 15:20 Afternoon tea

    15:40 FLYING THE PAYLOAD

    Phil Tudor

    Phil Tudor, UAV Projects Manager, Signal Computing

  • Command and control - reviewing the traditional approach Why a new emphasis? How? - system requirements and enabling technologies
  • Ground control of the payload Concealing complexity Simplification of the man-machine interface
  • Operator versus pilot The benefits The pitfalls
  • A brief case-study: the DERA/Cranfield ‘Observer’ concept
  • The future?
  • 16:20 THE US NAVAL UAV PROGRAM

    David Maddox

    David Maddox, Deputy Program Manager, Tactical Systems, PEO (CU),, US Navy

  • Naval UAV requirements update
  • CONOPS development overview
  • Payload requirements and initiatives
  • Tactical control system update
  • 17:00 Chairmans closing remarks and close of conference

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