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This timely conference aims to address the key strategic, environmental and equipment issues of contemporary and future Naval mine countermeasures and the drive toward producing an effective in-stride rapid mine clearance capability. Naval mines have been responsible for sinking and damaging more ships in the 20th Century than any other weapon system and, with the post-Cold War orientation of naval operations turning away from ‘blue water’ to ‘green’ or ‘brown’ water, the immediacy of their threat is back on the agenda. As a corollary of this, there has been a technological drive towards safer clearance. This symposium will systematically analyse this drive with reference to: surface minesweeping vessels; remote operated minesweeping vehicles; and helicopter based and launched technologies.

Companies and organisations attending SMi Defence events include: UK Ministry of Defence, Royal Navy, British Army, Raytheon Systems Company, Lockheed Martin, Royal Netherlands Navy, Russian Embassy, DaimlerChrysler Aerospace, Smiths Industries, The Royal Swedish Navy, The Boeing Company, Northrop Grumman, Thomson-CSF, United States Office of Naval Research, US Army, US Marine Corps, US Navy.

Naval Mines - Mine countermeasures- towards an in-stride rapid mine clearance capability is organised and produced by SMi: we specialise in providing senior executives with timely, strategic and focused up to date information. SMi conferences are leading-edge business events offering delegates the opportunity to meet senior industry and government figures and seek their advice and opinions.

Please register now to guarantee your place at this important conference.

Conference programme

8:30 Registration & Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Dr Eric Grove

Dr Eric Grove, Director of Security Studies, Centre for Security Studies, University of Hull

9:10 MINE COUNTERMEASURES- AN INTEGRAL PART OF US NAVAL STRATEGY

Rear-Admiral Curtis Kemp

Rear-Admiral Curtis Kemp, Executive Officer for Mine Warfare, US Navy

  • The move towards small scale contingencies and ‘brown’ or ‘green’ water operations
  • Mines- the greatest threat in the littoral?
  • Lessons learned in the Gulf War
  • An overview of the countermeasure options
  • 9:40 NAVAL MINE WARFARE VISION

    John Wickenden

    John Wickenden, Technical Director of Mine warfare, DERA

  • A brief overview of the history of naval mines
  • The threat of contemporary mines assessed
  • Leveraging technological opportunities to achieve new levels of effectiveness
  • Anticipating the impact of advancing technology on future mine warfare
  • 10:20 TARGET SIMULATION MODE MINE SWEEPING

    Tor Knudson

    Tor Knudson, Director of Research, Norwegian Defence Research Establishment (FFI)

  • The operational requirements for the Norwegian and Netherlands minesweeping capability
  • Minesetting Mode and Target Simulation Mode. Advantages and disadvantages for the two systems, how to choose
  • What information is needed to develop a measure of effectiveness in Target Simulation Mode (TSM)
  • Research for collecting vital data for implementing TSM minesweeping
  • The light weight tactical sensor unit (TASSEN)
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 MEETING NAVAL DEMANDS

    Commander Michael Schubert

    Commander Michael Schubert, Mine Countermeasures Officer, The German Navy

  • An overview of the technological challenges for naval mine countermeasures
  • The threat of mines assessed
  • Achieving a modern MCM system
  • The procurement requirements of the German navy
  • 12:00 NAVAL MINE COUNTERMEASURES: THE DANISH NAVY’S PERSPECTIVE

    Lieutenant Commander Henrik Nojgaard

    Lieutenant Commander Henrik Nojgaard, RDN, Weapon and Electronic Systems Section, The Royal Danish Navy

  • Adaption to the modularity and flexibility of Standard Flex 300 Units- MCM Containerisation
  • Reduction of risk- unmanned, remotely controlled drones and radio links
  • Layer effect- variable depth side scan sonar; Identification and neutralisation- underwater drone and disposal charge
  • Difficult mines and environment- mine sweeping systems
  • Experiences from operation allied harvest and the baltic area
  • Future MCM systems
  • 12:40 Lunch

    13:40 MINE RECOVERY SYSTEMS

    Malcolm Felmingham

    Malcolm Felmingham, Sales Executive, JW Automarine

  • The importance of being able to remove mines to safe areas for disposal
  • Producing a lifting bag capable of remotely lifting ordnance of up to 1000kg in mass
  • Achieving a controlled rate of ascent and descent of the MK4 system
  • Maintaining an acoustic operation capability
  • 14:20 EXPENDABLE MINE NEUTRALISATION SYSTEMS FOR OPPOSED OPERATIONS

    Chris Stafford

    Chris Stafford, Business Manager Minewarfare Weapons, BAE Systems

  • Mine disposal in opposed operations
  • Characteristics of expendables
  • New technologies to improve effectiveness
  • The expendable-is it truly expendable?
  • The ‘fire and forget’ vs. the ‘man in the loop’ principal
  • The way ahead
  • 15:00 MINE COUNTERMEASURES USING AN ELECTRO MAGNETIC FIELD

    Marty Ellner

    Marty Ellner, Programme Manager, The EDO Corporation

  • History
  • Operational Use
  • Flexibility
  • Safety
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    16:00 SURFACE SHIP ORGANIC MINE RECONNAISSANCE

    Robert W. Manning, Guy A Santora & Vickie G Seldenright

    Robert W. Manning, Guy A Santora & Vickie G Seldenright, , Lockheed Martin & US Navy

  • Defining operational requirements for surface ship organic minehunting capability
  • Designing the US Navy’s first unmanned, organic mine reconnaissance system
  • Building commonality with the US Navy’s airborne organic minehunting community
  • Designing for data collection in both deep and shallow waters
  • 16:40 EVALUATING LOGISTICAL ISSUES FOR MINEHUNTING COUNTERMEASURES EQUIPMENT

    Edward Benner & Catherine Harris

    Edward Benner & Catherine Harris, Senior Logistician, Maritime MCM Systems, Coastal System Stations, US Navy

  • An overview of the history of mine hunting logistics
  • Lessons learnt from the Iran/Iraq war and the Gulf War
  • Assessing the different logistics approaches
  • Achieving the in-stride capability
  • 17:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Dr Eric Grove

    Dr Eric Grove, Director of Security Studies, Centre for Security Studies, University of Hull

    9:10 US NAVY MINE WARFARE SHIP PROGRAM

    John Robert Edwards III

    John Robert Edwards III, MCM Ship Life Cycle Management Director, US Navy

    9:40 ORGANIC MINE COUNTERMEASURES FUTURE NAVAL CAPABILITY

    Dr Douglas G. Todoroff

    Dr Douglas G. Todoroff, Organic MCM FNC Program Manager, US Navy

  • Future naval capabilities development process
  • Prioritised enabling capabilities addressing critical capability gaps
  • Emerging technologies and opportunities
  • Recent experience with autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) during fleet battle experiment hotel
  • 10:20 UUVS FOR THE SAFE AND EFFICIENT DESTRUCTION OF MOORED AND GROUND MINES

    Vincent-Luc Le Glaunec

    Vincent-Luc Le Glaunec, Mine Warfare Export Sales Engineer, Eca (France)

  • RECA concept presentation with scenarios
  • Stability in current using the anchoring concept
  • Video of trials
  • Performance of the system- advantages and disadvantages
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 COLLABORATING IN ORDER TO PRODUCE AN EXCELLENT UUV

    Per Espen Hagen

    Per Espen Hagen, Principal Scientist, Norwegian Defence Research Establishment (FFI)

  • Project background and development philosophy
  • Dual use development: using civilian demands to push military applications
  • Critical technologies: Autonomous navigation, autonomous mine detection, power sources
  • Advantages of the HUGIN mine hunting concept
  • 12:00 UUVS WITH GUN DETONATION SYSTEMS

    Dr Paul Reip & Tor Knudson

    Dr Paul Reip & Tor Knudson, Head of Guns and Warheads Dept & Director of Research, DERA & , Norwegian Defence Research Establishment (FFI)

  • The advantages of detonating a mine by firing a warhead at it
  • The capabilities of the Semi-Armour Piercing gun system assessed
  • Effective targeting using the semi-automatic and manual control
  • Using the re-location sensor in poor visibility
  • 12:40 Lunch

    13:40 AIRBORNE MINE NEUTRALIZATION

    Captain Louis Morris

    Captain Louis Morris, Programme Manager of Airborne Defence system, US Navy

  • The advantages of an airborne-launched system
  • The various options for airborne systems assessed
  • Expendable systems:-are they value for money?
  • Achieving a high degree of operator-controlled manoeuvrability
  • 14:20 AIRBORNE MINE COUNTERMEASURES FOR RAPID CLEARANCE ABOVE SHALLOW WATER

    Marty Ellner

    Marty Ellner, Program Manager, The EDO Corporation

  • Designing a system for clearing mines in shallow water at maximum speed
  • Achieving a system capable of being contained in a MH-53E Mine Countermeasures Helicopter
  • The need to deploy on arrival in order to maximise sweep speed and reduce vulnerability
  • 15:00 Afternoon Tea

    15:20 AIRBORNE MINE NEUTRALIZATION

    Eric Holmes

    Eric Holmes, Programme Manager of Airborne Neutralisation system, Lockheed Martin

  • The advantages of an AIRBORNE launched system
  • An expendable system:-is it value for money?
  • Achieving a high degree of operator-controlled manoeuvrability
  • The operator-selected method of warhead detonation assessed
  • 15:50 SHIP’S DESIGNED FOR MINEHUNTNG

    Jesus Pascual & Juan C. Morillo

    Jesus Pascual & Juan C. Morillo, Platform Design Technical Manager & Combat System Project Manager, E.N. Bazan

  • Requirements & Missions
  • Ship Description
  • Design & Construction Proccess
  • Combat System
  • 16:20 SUPPORT SYSTEMS FOR MINEHUNTING SHIPS

    Lisa Hunter-Yeats

    Lisa Hunter-Yeats, Engineering Manager Integrated Systems, Alenia Marconi

  • The advantages of the NAUTIS Command and Control System in mission planning and mine operations
  • Lessons learnt from the use of NAUTIS as in service with some of the world’s major navies
  • Effective systems engineering management
  • Improving obsolescence management
  • 17:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

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