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As a senior industry executive, you will be aware of the importance and potential of this field. We would therefore like to invite you to register for SMi’s Urban Warfare. The increase in global urbanisation in turn increases the probability of future conflicts in cities and towns. Events in Chechnya, the Balkans and Somalia have illustrated a necessity to prepare forces for similar future conflicts. This event provides a unique opportunity to assess the latest issues and developments in the urban warfare field.

The conference offers you the opportunity to network with key military, research and industry experts. Attend to discover the realities of urban warfare, and to match your organisation’s strategies and technological development with the battlefield of the future.

Companies and organisations attending last year’s Urban Warfare event include:

  • UK Ministry of Defence
  • British Army
  • DERA
  • Lockheed Martin
  • Royal Netherlands Army
  • US Army
  • Russian Embassy
  • Bofors Carl Gustafs AB
  • IDA
  • Mandator Interactive AB US MCIA
  • Thomson-CSF,
  • DARPA,
  • US Army Research Laboratory,
  • US Air Force

Urban Warfare is organised and produced by SMi: we specialise in providing senior executives with timely, strategic and focused business information. SMi conferences are leading-edge business events offering delegates the opportunity to meet senior industry and government figures and seek their advice and opinions.

Please register now to guarantee your place at this important conference.

Conference programme

8:30 Registration & Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Colonel Mike Crawshaw (Ret’d) OBE

Colonel Mike Crawshaw (Ret’d) OBE, Editor, British Army Review

9:10 KEYNOTE ADDRESS

Brigadier Seymour Monro CBE

Brigadier Seymour Monro CBE, Director of Infantry, British Army

  • Concept - why attack an urban area?
  • Is there military gain to be had?
  • Evaluating the need to undertake urban warfare
  • Balancing high losses against military gain
  • Should it be avoided at all costs?
  • Effective training to prepare the infantryman for all scenarios
  • 9:50 PRECISION TARGETING FROM THE AIR

    Major General John Barry

    Major General John Barry, Director of Strategic, US Air Force

  • The ability to hit targets very close to civilian facilities
  • Minimising civilian casualties
  • Target uncertainty issues - accurate identification of the enemy
  • The challenges made by the storage of weapons of mass destruction within an urban environment
  • The differences between mobile and stationary targets and the relative hit probability
  • Kosovo as an example
  • 10:30 TRAINING FOR URBAN WARFARE

    Major Ian Orr MBE

    Major Ian Orr MBE, Officer in Command FIBUA Training Team, British Army

  • Improving operational effectiveness of soldiers
  • Determining the military utility of advanced technologies
  • Testing new operational concepts to achieve dominance in urban warfare
  • Providing interim operational capabilities with associated Tactics, Techniques and Procedures (TTPs)
  • Setting the stage for rapid acquisition of the successful advanced concept technology products
  • Lessons learnt from the most recent experiments
  • 11:10 Morning Coffee

    11:30 FIBUA TRAINING AND MOUT EXERCISES

    Major Johan Benson

    Major Johan Benson, Development Officer FIBUA, Royal Lifeguards Regiment, Kungsängen Sweden

  • An overview of the concept of Swedish units for MOUT
  • Training and Tactics of MOUT units
  • Future concept of units for MOUT and ongoing projects
  • Lessons learnt from recent MOUT exercises
  • 12:10 CULMINATING DEMONSTRATION OF THE MOUT ACTD AT FT POLK (SEP 2000)

    Colonel Mitch Poodry

    Colonel Mitch Poodry, Deputy Director Dismounted Battlespace Battlelab, US Army

  • Road to the JCF AWE
  • Results/lessons Learned at Ft Polk
  • C4I
  • Force Protection
  • Mobility; Engagement
  • The Way Ahead
  • 12:40 Lunch

    13:40 SIMULATION TRAINING SYSTEMS

    Colonel Craig Hanford

    Colonel Craig Hanford, Project Manager for Training Devices, STRICOM, US Army

  • Initial US approach - Joint Readiness Training Center Instrumentation System
  • MOUT Instrumentation & Training Device Working Group
  • MOUT common architecture
  • MOUT / restrictive terrain ID / IQ contract vehicle
  • 14:00 TACTICAL MOBILE ROBOTICS

    Arnis Mangolds

    Arnis Mangolds, Operations Manager, Foster-Miller Inc.

  • Robot perception, autonomy and obstacle negotiation
  • Autonomous fault recovery and operation
  • Integrating enabling technologies into functional platforms
  • Advanced communication and control techniques
  • Smart sensor incorporation
  • Development of fully functional tactical robotic platforms
  • 14:40 FRENCH COUNTER-SNIPER FIRE

    Lieutenant Colonel Laqua

    Lieutenant Colonel Laqua, Technical Co-ordinator, Section Technique De L’Armee De Terre, French Army

  • Summary of studies to date
  • The sniper in the urban environment - problems of detection
  • The need for an ultra-rapid response time
  • PILAR the acoustic approach - a case study
  • Infra-red and laser developments in counter sniper fire technology
  • French initiatives and projects
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    16:20 COMBAT SEARCH AND RESCUE (CSAR) IN THE URBAN TERRAIN

    Lieutenant Commander Richard Jackson

    Lieutenant Commander Richard Jackson, , Executive Officer, Helicopter Interdiction Squadron Ten, US Coast Guard

  • The problems faced in terms of personnel, capability, force, morale and political factors
  • CSAR/SAR principles
  • The rescue team
  • The equipment; The methods; The rescuees
  • CSAR against the urban battlefield: a factorial increase in application and benefit of the warfare skill
  • Future operations
  • 17:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    17:10 Drinks reception for speakers and delegates

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Lieutenant Colonel Stephen Oxlade MBE

    Lieutenant Colonel Stephen Oxlade MBE, , Commandant, Infantry Trials and Development Unit, British Army

    9:10 URBAN CONFLICT - PSYCHOLOGICAL FALL-OUT

    Lieutenant Colonel Ian Palmer

    Lieutenant Colonel Ian Palmer, Tri Service Professor of Defence Psychiatry, Royal Defence Medical College

  • Combatants; Stressors; Resistance to stress
  • Recognition of stress reactions
  • Management of stress reactions
  • Non-combatants; Stressors; Population at risk
  • Effect on mission; Effect on combatants
  • Management
  • 9:50 ISRAELI BORDER URBAN DEVELOPMENTS

    Professor Arnon Soffer

    Professor Arnon Soffer, Vice Chairman of the National Security Studies Center, Haifa University, Israel

  • Growth of Middle Eastern Urbanisation with emphasis on Israeli boundaries
  • Effect of urbanisation on the IDF defensive strategies
  • The development of the Israeli defence concept
  • Conclusions and recommendations
  • 10:30 VISION TECHNOLOGY

    Mr Steve Rickard & Mr David Price

    Mr Steve Rickard & Mr David Price, Business Development Manager FIST & Engineering Director, Pilkington Optronics & PPE

  • Assessment of barriers to vision within an urban environment
  • Image intensification techniques
  • Thermal imager techniques; Other relevant sensors
  • Remote observation and engagement
  • Use of active E/O techniques
  • Integrating enhanced vision technologies into a future Soldier System
  • 11:10 Morning Coffee

    11:30 CHECHEN URBAN STRATEGY AND TACTICS

    Marie Bennigsen Broxup

    Marie Bennigsen Broxup, Editor, Central Asian Survey

  • Strategy, doctrine and approach
  • De-centralised urban warfare; using clan-based culture to best effect
  • Weapons systems - adapting to the urban terrain
  • Tactical communications down to the lowest levels
  • HUMINT; advantageous use of local knowledge throughout a conflict
  • Logistic infrastructure; Chechen weaknesses; a chink in the ‘armour’
  • 12:10 URBAN COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEM SOLUTIONS

    Gerulf Kinkelin

    Gerulf Kinkelin, Business Development Director, Thomson-CSF COMSYS

  • High density combat versus peacekeeping issues
  • Communications in urban environment
  • Future trends:
    • location reporting systems
    • friendly identification
    • sniper localisation
    • fire support
  • 12:50 Lunch

    14:00 FIRE SUPPORT WEAPONS

    Ronald Knight

    Ronald Knight, Program Manager, Advanced Concepts and Technology, Lockheed Martin Missiles & Fire Control

  • The need for fire support in MOUT
  • Urban scenarios for fire support
  • Operation engagement issues
  • Desired features of urban fire support weapon systems
  • Long range fire support weapon systems options
  • Precision/non-lethal payload options; Precision/non-lethal payload issues
  • 14:40 URBAN WARFARE RCV’s

    Tim Young & Dr Marcus Penny

    Tim Young & Dr Marcus Penny, Principal Marketing Advisor & Project Manager, Robotics & Remote Control, DERA

  • Current robotics ARP’s - ‘cherry-picking’
  • Relevance to urban warfare requirements
  • Perception of RCV’s by UK MOD
  • Advances in ‘intelligent’ systems - semi-autonomous
  • Advances in C3i of RCV’s - generic console, stereoscopic vision and communications
  • Sensors & weapon systems; Urban warfare RCV’s - vision
  • 15:20 BUNKER-BUSTING WEAPONRY

    Lieutenant Colonel Georg Stammel (Ret’d)

    Lieutenant Colonel Georg Stammel (Ret’d), Sales Manager, Diehl Munitionssysteme GmbH & Co. KG

  • Development / Status
  • Overall Characteristics
  • Sequence of Function
  • Range of targets
  • Test Results
  • Effectiveness Analysis
  • 16:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks, Afternoon Tea and Close of Conference

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

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