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Examine command post technology to create an adaptive decision-centred environment…

To save you time and money researching the latest developments in command post technology, SMi are producing a conference to meet all your demands in this field. Attend SMi’s forthcoming Command Posts of the Future conference taking place on the 14th & 15th November 2001 at the Hatton in London, to examine topics including:

  • NATO's Information portal
  • Current and future programmes: UK, Europe, NATO & USA
  • Technological advancements
  • Context management & visualisation
  • Mobility & rapid deployment
  • Country specific perspectives
  • Integrating COTS technology
  • Knowledge management
  • Mission planning
  • Operational requirements
  • Live demonstration

With representatives attending from the major players in this industry, this conference will meet all your networking requirements. And what’s more, you can gain all these contacts in just 2 days! And with our lunches promoting open debate, you will have the perfect opportunity to build these relationships and exchange industry specific knowledge.

Conference programme

8:30 Registration & Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Col (Ret’d) Jeremy Barrett

Col (Ret’d) Jeremy Barrett, Head of Defence Systems, Defence Group, Hi-Q Systems

9:10 INTRODUCTORY REMARKS ON CPOF

Colonel Mike McGinnis

Colonel Mike McGinnis, Professor & Head, Department of Systems Engineering, United States Military Academy

  • Goals of the CPOF effort as it relates to headquarters redesign
  • An insight into achievements
  • Problems encountered with the simulation based experiments
  • Challenges for the future
  • How the United States Military Academy envisages the future of CPOF
  • 9:40 NIP - NATO’S INFORMATION PORTAL

    Victor Rodriguez-Herola

    Victor Rodriguez-Herola, NIP Task leader, NATO C3 Agency

  • Addressing the information overload problem at command posts with NIP
  • Information management: The first problem to solve with NIP
  • NIP as the single point of access
  • NIP modular architecture approach
  • NIP: Technological baseline towards a knowledge-centric organisation
  • (This NATO project was formally known as the Virtual Command Centre (VCC) before having a change of name to NIP)
  • 10:20 MOBILITY AND RAPID DEPLOYMENT REGARDING FUTURE COMMAND POSTS

    Major (Retd) J.M. Davidson

    Major (Retd) J.M. Davidson, Business Development - Military, Marshall Specalist Vechicles

  • Introduction to Command Post Initiatives
  • Strategic, Operational and Tactical Mobility
  • A Technology Overview
  • CPOF Challenges Addressed
  • Future Considerations
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 VIRTUAL COMMAND AND CONTROL SYSTEMS

    Berndt Brehmer

    Berndt Brehmer, Professor of Command and Control Decision Making, Swedish National Defense College

  • The challenge for Swedish Armed Forces for better Battlefield Decision Making
  • Project ROLF - a project for future joint command and control
  • How the ROLF concept departs from traditional command and control unit configurations
  • Objectives of ROLF
  • Challenges that ROLF faces
  • The future for Swedish CPOF
  • 12:00 BRIDGING THE GAP BETWEEN COTS TECHNOLOGY AND THE END USER

    Lt Col. Erik Schwensen

    Lt Col. Erik Schwensen, Chairman of the Operational User group of DACCIS, Danish Division, Royal Danish Army

  • The Danish DACCIS project - an overview
  • The involvement of end users to optimize COTS technology
  • Integrating the system into the existing Danish Forces
  • A live demonstration of the product
  • 12:40 Lunch

    13:40 QINETIQS CURRENT COMMAND POST INIATIVE

    Simon Henderson

    Simon Henderson, Technical Manager of CP21, QinetiQ

  • Introduction - Command Post 21 and its relationship to Applied Research Package 13
  • Challenges of CP21
  • Core Programme
  • Experimentation
  • Way ahead
  • 14:20 SIMULATIONS DURING OPERATIONS

    Major John R. Buck Surdu

    Major John R. Buck Surdu, Assistant Professor and Senior Research Scientist, Information Technology and Operations Center, United States Army

  • An introduction to the importance of Simulation Technologies
  • How Simulation technologies can help the commander on the battlefield
  • How simulation technologies relates to CPOF
  • The future for the commander and CPOF
  • 15:00 HOW DREV HAS APPROACHED CPOF THOROUGH IT’S CCIS EXPERIMENTATION

    Valdur Pille

    Valdur Pille, Defence Scientist, C2IS experimentation Section, Defence Research Establishment Valcartier (DREV)

  • Introduction to DREV's expertise in CCIS experimentation
  • DREV's Command and Control Sector
  • Functional prototypes for experimentation: Air Force, Army, Navy
  • Integrated Battle Lab
  • The future for CCIS experimentation
  • 15:40 Afternoon Tea

    16:00 MISSION PLANNING IN THE 21st CENTURY

    Lt Colonel Richard Cashman (Ret)

    Lt Colonel Richard Cashman (Ret), Senior Planning Analyst, HQ Air Combat Command, USAF

  • USAF Mission Planning Roadmap
  • Mission Planning Data Requirements
  • Increased Mission Planning Workload for Precision Guided Munitions
  • Shortening the Tasking Cycle
  • Mission Planning Case Studies - Recent Experience in Balkans and Iraq
  • 16:30 ADVANCED AMPHIBIOUS ASSAULT VEHICLE, COMMAND VARIANT (AAAV(C).

    Lt Col Harry G. Oldland

    Lt Col Harry G. Oldland, Assistant Program Manager for the AAAV(C), U.S. Marine Corps

  • Introduction to the AAAV
  • AAAV(C) requirements
  • C4i system integration
  • Use of commercial electronics
  • The future for the AAAV(C)
  • 17:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    7:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

    7:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    James Giles

    James Giles, CEO, International Aerospace

    9:10 ABSOLUTE COMMAND USING INFINITELY LARGE AND ZOOMABLE WHITEBOARD

    John Ko

    John Ko, CTO/CEO, Cincro Communications Corporation

  • R&D Background
  • Technology Overview
  • CPOF Challenges Addressed
  • Whiteboard as a Visualization Infrastructure
  • Application Examples
  • Integration with Commercial Collaboration Platforms
  • 9:40 SECURE INFORMATION MANAGEMENT FOR A VIRTUAL COALITION COMMAND POST

    Mike Jackson (Air Vice Marshal Ret'd)

    Mike Jackson (Air Vice Marshal Ret'd), Business Development Director, Oracle

  • The Implications of Collaborative Working
  • The Coalition ‘Enterprise’
  • Business Space to Battlespace
  • Securely Managing Information and Knowledge Domains
  • 10:20 INTEGRATING COTS INTO A CPOF

    James Giles

    James Giles, CEO, International Aerospace

  • Defining operational specifications with COTS
  • Integrating space into the CPOF
  • COTS and the COP
  • Live demonstration
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 SPACE SUPPORT IS ESSENTIAL TO THE COMMAND POST OF THE FUTURE

    Kirby R. Brown

    Kirby R. Brown, Deputy Director for Space, U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command, Space Battle Lab

  • The role of space support to CPOF
  • Space enhancements to support Command and Control
    - Communications
    - Imagery
    - Real-time situational awareness
    - Navigation
    - Targeting/Retargeting
  • The potential role Space will play in the future of all military operations
  • 12:00 HUMAN COMPUTER INTERACTION AND CPOF

    Lisbeth M. Rasmussen

    Lisbeth M. Rasmussen, Senior Advisor, Danish Defense Research Establishment (DDRE)

  • Visualisation on the battlefield
  • Combining 2D and 3D to help decision making
  • Rapid generation of 3D model of battlefield; future needs
  • Visualisation needs in peacekeeping operations
  • 12:40 Lunch

    13:40 The US ARMY RESEARCH LAB’S PERSPECTIVE ON CPOF

    Mario A. Torres

    Mario A. Torres, Computer Engineer, Army Research Lab

  • Introduction to ARL's contributions to the Command Post of the Future
  • Weather intelligence - an essential factor of the CPOF plan
  • Integrating Weather Decision Aids into the CPOF
  • Distributing weather intelligence to the soldier
  • Current and future developments
  • Challenges
  • 14:20 CURRENT CAPABILITIES AND FUTURE THINKING FOR COMMAND POSTS

    Manny Mora

    Manny Mora, Vice President & General Manager, Integrated Systems Division, Motorola

  • Developing a service-based architecture called Openwings.
  • Analysis of architecture which includes an approach for a Universal Ground Station (UGS), a true plug and play framework for systems and systems of systems.
  • Openwings provides a foundation for self forming Distributed Real Time Systems with increased interoperability and little or no network administration
  • Integrated network communications with a goal of anything to anything communications
  • Vision for an integrated architecture for C2 and ISR
  • 15:00 TRADOC’S EMERGING COMMAND POST CONCEPTS AND REQUIREMENTS

    Ronald Vandiver

    Ronald Vandiver, Director, C4ISR Directorate, HQ TRADOC, DCSCD

  • Operational Environment
  • Warfighter Requirements
  • Battle Command on the move
  • The Human Dimension
  • The Future
  • 15:40 Afternoon Tea

    16:00 THE AREA AIR DEFENSE COMMANDER (AADC) CAPABILITY PROGRAM

    CDR Dean M. Pedersen

    CDR Dean M. Pedersen, Program Manager of AADC, Naval Sea Systems Command

  • Introduction to the AADC program
  • An explanation of the ADDC program and how it links to CPOF
  • Benefits of the program
  • Problems encountered by the program
  • How these problems were overcome
  • The next steps for the ADDC program
  • 16:30 THE JWID ’02 PROGRAM

    Gary R. Bradley

    Gary R. Bradley, Director, JWID ’02 Joint Project Office

  • What is JWID?
  • Why a need for it?
  • The objectives of JWID
  • Problems encountered
  • The future of the JWID program - The Global Information Grid
  • +

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    51/53 Hatton Garden
    London EC1N 8HN
    United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

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