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Future Combat Vehicles III will cover vehicles and systems. Currently the US Army is undergoing a debate about moving to an all-wheeled force, whilst the growth of low and medium intensity operations has placed greater emphasis on mobility rather than armour and firepower. Wheeled vehicles are deployed in a variety of roles by many countries’ armed forces, and there is also a succession of requirements for either artillery, troop carrier or liaison vehicles which would fall into this category. Alongside the platforms are the communications systems, weapons systems and fire control systems are the survivability issues for the vehicle and the issue of field support.

This conference will cover the following key areas:

Policy/ Requirements

Rapid deployment requirements = easier to transport

Transformation of the ground combat vehicle fleet

Look at UK & US transformation plans, policies

Likely future operational requirements for FCV’s

NATO mobility and deployment – requirements

Country specific future combat systems

UK FRES – Future Rapid Effects System

Medium force option - requirements, capability and achievability

US Future Scout and Cavalry System (FSCS)

Look at issue of reduced weight, reduced armour, reduced vulnerability.

Quick Reactive Forces: need to be as light & mobile as possible

The roles of light armoured vehicles in the future battlefield

The role of medium weight forces in the future combat force

The future of heavy armour in the future battlespace

Armoured vehicles V Tracked debate

Look at the benefits of wheeled AFVs – why increased use, deployability, better for humanitarian missions

Procurement strategies

TECHNOLOGY FOR FCV Future Combat Systems & The use of EW – missile approach warning systems

‘Hit avoidance’, threat warning systems etc

Look at technology applications and system engineering in the design of armoured vehicles

Weapon systems for future armoured vehicles

Future propulsion systems

Previous attendees' have included

Italian Army General Staff, GM Defence Delco Systems, ABRO, Belgian Army Staff, RUAG Land Systems, British Army, Department Of Defense, QinetiQ, SaabTech Systems, US Navy International Field Office

Topics and speakers from SMi's previous Future Combat Vehicles include

The Future Battlefield and Implications for Future Fighting Vehicles

Brigadier Charles Grant, Director of Land Warfare, MOD

An overview of the roles for light/medium weight vehicless

Dr William A J Carson, Programme Director Manoeuvre, QINETIQ

The future ground force ethos of the US Army

Paul Wilson, FCS Deputy Program Manager, US Army

Overview of the French requirements for Wheeled Armoured Fighting vehicles

Colonel Philipe Mangin, Head of Mounted Combat, Combat Development Department, French Army

An overview of medium weight forces

Major Gaetano Di Lorenzo, Officer of the Combat Vehicles Section of the Logistics Branch, Italian Army General Staff

The future developments in combat vehicles for the US Army

Walter P. Wynbelt, Executive Director, Development Business Group, TACOM-TARDEC, TACOM

The Application of Technology and Systems Engineering in the Design of Armoured Vehicles

Les Tyler, Project Executive, Vickers Defence

SWEDISH ARMY DEVELOPMENTS IN FUTURE COMBAT VEHICLES

Rickard O. Lindstrom, Project Manager, Swedish SEP Programme

Overview of Finnish armoured vehicles

Seppo Marin, Marketing Director, Patria Vehicles

Turrets and Tow Missile systems

Alf Borstad Marketing Manager, Kvaerner Eureka

Rick Beacham, Director of International Programs, Raytheon Systems

GIAT industries new VBCI program Marc Chassillan, Armoured Systems Concept Manager, GIAT

Modern electric hybrid propulsion systems

Dr Peter Ehrhart, General Manager, Magnet-Motor GmbH

Case study of the MRAV programme

Michael Pope, Head of Business Development, ALVIS Vehicles

Remote weapon systems on armoured fighting vehicles

Nick Martin, Technical Director, Thales Helio

The Centauro family vehicles

Lt Col Giovanni Manione, Section Chief of the Planning Branch, Italian Army General Staff

GM Canada’s LAV III and the European equivalent the Piranha III

Steve Moyse, Manager independent R&D, GM Defense

Conference programme

8:30 Registration and Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Christopher Foss

Christopher Foss, Editor, Jane's Land Forces

9:10 KEYNOTE ADDRESS A LOOK AT THE NEEDS OF TODAY & THE FUTURE

Brigadier R A M S Melvin OBE

Brigadier R A M S Melvin OBE, Director Land Warfare, Directorate General Development & Doctrine, Ministry of Defence

  • Changing operational needs
  • Fast mobility is the 21st-century priority
  • Continuing improvements of armoured vehicles
  • Is the view on armoured vehicles shifting?
  • Protection is still a key requirement

    The ability to be carried in transport aircraft

  • Cost effective logistics

    Future requirements in the field of light and heavy armoured vehicles and lessons learned

  • 9:40 ADVANCED AMPHIBIOUS ASSAULT VEHICLE (AAAV)

    Lieutenant Colonel Joseph (Joe) D Howard

    Lieutenant Colonel Joseph (Joe) D Howard, Deputy Director of Engineering, Office of the Direct Reporting Program Manager, Advanced Amphibious Assault, United States Marine Corps

  • AAAV and expeditionary manoeuvre warfare, a concept based requirement
  • Attributes and capabilities: lethality, survivability, mobility and C4I
  • Program strategy and progress update
  • 10:20 FUTURE COMBAT SYSTEM UPDATE

    Paul Wilson

    Paul Wilson, Deputy Program Manager, US Army

  • Transition from tech base to system development
  • Integration to achieve network centric capability
  • Unique management approach
  • Path forward
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 FUTURE COMMAND & LIAISON VEHICLES

  • FCLV battlefield roles and missions
  • FCLV requirements
  • Relevant technologies
  • Technical solution approaches
  • Paul Shorting

    Paul Shorting, Project Manager, INSYS

    Edward Maddox

    Edward Maddox, Programme Manager, United Defense

    12:00 INDUSTRY VISIONS OF THE FUTURE

    Tim Burleigh

    Tim Burleigh, Engineering Sales Manager, Vickers Defence

  • Designing for global operability and rapid deployability
  • Achieving high reliability from COTS sub-systems in military applications
  • Providing balanced and adaptable survivability solutions
  • Achieving coherence and supportability across a large vehicle family
  • 12:40 Lunch

    14:00 DEVELOPMENT OF INNOVATIVE, FLEXIBLE AND COST EFFECTIVE FIGHTING SYSTEMS

    Dr Rick Hyde

    Dr Rick Hyde, Principle Engineer, The MathWorks

  • Combat vehicles, like other military systems, demand much greater functionality from supporting systems - risk and cost in terms of determining exact requirements, and ensuring correct implementation
  • Model Based Design – supporting the review of requirements at an early stage – use of graphical tools, larger battlefield models using DIS and HLA technologies - understanding the potential benefits of emerging technologies and de-risk the integration with the complete platform
  • Early conceptual models - refinement and development into full functional requirements, real-time embedded code generated automatically using Real-Time Workshop
  • By developing tool-supported processes you can help achieve differentiation through more innovative products developed to tight timescales, and at lower cost
  • 15:20 CASE STUDY: GERMANY

    Erhard Achtziger

    Erhard Achtziger, Project Manager, Fennek Reconnaissance Vehicle, Krauss Maffei Wegmann

  • Overview of the vehicle features
  • Analysis of armament and the systems that control them
  • Advantages of wheels over tracks on an artillery system
  • How the Fennek fits into the modern fighting force
  • Armour protection of the vehicle
  • Future developments in Germany
  • 16:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks, Afternoon Tea and Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Christopher Foss

    Christopher Foss, Editor, Jane's Land Forces

    9:10 THE HISTORY OF COMBAT VEHICLES

    Brigadier (Ret’d) C S Grant OBE

    Brigadier (Ret’d) C S Grant OBE, Secretary and Chief Executive, Highland Reserved Forces & Cadet Association

  • Overview of armoured vehicles on the battlefields and the logistics involved over the years
  • How the needs and requirements have changed
  • Challenges to make future armoured vehicles survivable and more lethal on the battlefield
  • Exploiting technological advances – the most significant changes
  • Wheeled vehicles in modern combat scenarios – has the emphasis changed?
  • From past to the present and beyond – lessons learnt
  • 9:40 FUTURE COMBAT SYSTEMS PLATFORMS

    Colonel William Johnson Ph.D

    Colonel William Johnson Ph.D, Program Manager, Objective Force, DARPA/FCS

  • FCS program overview
  • FCS platform requirements
  • Architectures
  • Commonality of components
  • Path ahead
  • 10:20 MAGTF EXPEDITIONARY FAMILY OF FIGHTING VEHICLES (MEFFV)

    Lieutenant Colonel Skip Gaskill

    Lieutenant Colonel Skip Gaskill, Director, MEFFV Technologies, United States Marine Corps

  • What is MEFFV?
  • Technology focus areas
  • Timeline
  • Where are we today?
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 BRADLEY FIGHTING VEHICLES

    Col Curtis McCoy

    Col Curtis McCoy, PM Bradley Fighting Vehicle Systems, US Army

  • THREAT Assessment
  • Bradley Evolution
  • Operational/Performance Requirements
  • Family of Vehicles
  • U.S. Army Transformation to the Objective Force
  • 12:00 FRENCH PERSPECTIVE

    Marc Chassillan

    Marc Chassillan, Armoured Systems Concept Manager, GIAT Industries

  • Role and mission of AMX 10RC in the French army
  • The modernisation programme
  • The armament issue
  • Reliability
  • Digitization

    Survivability

  • Future improvements
  • 12:40 Lunch

    14:00 ARMOURED VEHICLES

    Rainer Ackermann

    Rainer Ackermann, Director, Marketing & Sales Electro-optics EW, EADS Deutschland

  • Present protection of land vehicles
  • Responding to the changing threat
  • The advantages of the MUSS system in terms of protection
  • Operational capabilities of the MUSS system
  • System features
  • 14:40 PROTECTOR, REMOTE WEAPON STATION

    Knut Saeter

    Knut Saeter, Director, Marketing & Sales, Kongsberg Protech

  • Remote weapon station vs. conventional solutions
  • Presentation of the protector, remote weapon station, selected for the US Army BCT program
  • Fire control systems
  • Firing accuracy improvements
  • Future technical options
  • Vehicle applications
  • 15:20 TOP BREAKTHROUGHS IN THE DESIGN OF NEW IFV & MBT

    Patrick Michon

    Patrick Michon, Advanced Products Director, Ground Systems NGFS, EADS Systems & Defence Electronics

  • Protection - about the threats - existing equipment - ADAS system function, missile warner, laser warner, computer, software, countermeasures - anti-tanks missiles able to be defeated by ADAS systems
  • Fire power - the importance of the Gun/turret drive in the vehicle fighting efficiency - the Main feature of a state of the art All Electric Drive & Stabilisation system - operational advantages - the point of view of the maintenance team
  • 16:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks, Afternoon Tea and Close of Conference

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