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Indirect Fire can simply be defined as a capability to support troops a capability that is not in the line of sight of the target. It is as simple as that, however it is the systems in use and not necessarily just the principle that this conference will concentrate.

Indirect Fire is directed against targets the fire cannot see, usually from information provided by forward observers, observation aircraft, UAV/RPV, or recon vehicles. All long-range artillery fire is indirect fire.

Indirect fire weapons include artillery units equipped with either field guns (howitzers), or heavy mortars. Artillery is that part of an army that controls the bigger, long range weapons, formerly referred to as cannons. In battle, the artillery's role is to provide fire support for the infantry, cavalry, armour and other units. The projectile, rocket, missile, and bomb are the weapons of indirect-fire systems. Indirect fire can cause casualties to troops, inhibit mobility, suppress or neutralise weapon systems, damage equipment and installations, and demoralise the enemy. Historically, more combat deaths have been caused by indirect fire weapons than by any other means, hence the designation of artillery as the King of Battle. The initial rounds cause most casualties to troops in an indirect-fire attack. Best results are achieved by a short engagement at a high rate from as many weapons as possible

Previous Attendee's at SMi Defence include

Ministry of Defence, Department of Defence, Lockheed Martin, DERA, Cranfield University, The Boeing Company, French Navy, Swiss Air Force, QinetiQ

Speakers from Indirect Fire 2001 Conference include

Dr David Izod, Consultant, Cranfield University, Royal Military College of Science

LTC Jefferson, S01 Battlespace Science and Technology, Directorate General Development and Doctrine, British Army

Commander Philip Buckley, Staff Warfare Officer to Flag Officer Submarines, Royal Navy

Colonel Roland Von Reden , Branch Chief Combat Support Branch, German Army Office

Cliff Waldwyn, Business Development Manager, Alenia Marconi Systems Dynamics Division

Michael Rowe, Manager, Weapons Systems, General Dynamics Armaments Systems

LTC Razat, Chief of Indirect Fire and Air Defence, French Army

John Halvey, Program Manager, XM982 Excalibur Program, Raytheon Missile Systems

Colonel (Ret) Frank Hartline, Senior Business Development Manager, Raytheon Missile Systems

Martin Pearce, Marketing Manager- Navigation & LINAPS, BAE Systems

Olaf Eschler, Vice President International Marketing, Krauss-Maffei Wegmann

Commander Jon Ivar Kjellin, Company Commander, Coastal Ranger Commando, Royal Norwegian Navy

PO Major Anders Callert, Study and Development Section, Swedish Army

PO Dr Koos Verolme, Manager Product Development, RDM Technology

Ian Mitchell, Marketing Director, Instro Precision

William Kurtz, Director of Marketing, KDI Precision Products

Topics Covered at the Indirect Fire 2001

BRITISH ARMY FIREPOWER 2010-15

Flexible launch platforms for the 21st Century

German Indirect Fire Support Present and Future

Case study: The BRIMSTONE

DIGITISATION OF INDIRECT FIRE SUPPORT

EVOLUTION PROSPECTS AND EQUIPMENT OF THE FRENCH FIELD ARTILLERY

Case Study: 105mm Truck-mounted Howitzer

F734A1 MULTI-OPTION MORTAR FUZE

DISMOUNTED TARGET ACQUISATION AND FORWARD AIR CONTROL

State of the art Mortar munitions

The Excalibur Precision-Guided Extended Range Artillery Projectile

Seeking the precision effect

BONUS: TARGET DETECTION ANTI-TANK ARTILLERY SHELL

ARTILLERY NAVIGATION AND POINTING WEAPON MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

Indirect Fire Support and the role of the Norwegian Navy

Conference programme

8:30 Registration & Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Dr David Izod

Dr David Izod, Independent Defence Consultant,

9:10 OPENING ADDRESS

Lieutenant Colonel Dickie Winchester

Lieutenant Colonel Dickie Winchester, Chief Instructor Tactics, The Royal School of Artillery

  • The role of indirect fire in the operational arena
  • Force structure and future concepts for British forces
  • Requirements and priorities of indirect fire
  • Defence expenditure trends; indirect fire systems and platforms
  • Indirect fire weaponry - a global outlook
  • Indirect fire; future vision and strategy
  • 9:40 ARTILLERY OBSERVERS

    Colonel G S Roland von Reden

    Colonel G S Roland von Reden, Chief of Combat Support Development Branch, Army Office (Heeresamt) (Training & Doctrine) German Army

  • Fenek Reconnaissance Vehicle
  • Considerations of other heavy reconnaissance vehicles
  • Concepts of artillery observers
  • 10:20 US MARINE CORPS EXPEDITIONARY FIRE SUPPORT SYSTEM (EFSS)

    Joseph E Sholander

    Joseph E Sholander, Fire Support Systems Engineer, US Marine Corps Systems

  • Current USMC ground fire support systems
  • Future triad of USMC ground fire support systems
  • The EFSS Concept
  • EFSS project status
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 ARTILLERY SYSTEMS FOR THE FUTURE

    Bob Preedy

    Bob Preedy, Head of Marketing, BAE SYSTEMS RO Defence

    12:00 NLOS CANNON REQUIREMENTS

    Colonel John Klemencic

    Colonel John Klemencic, Training and Doctrine Command System Manager – Cannon Systems, United States Army

  • The requirement for Indirect Fire Support
  • Crusaders’ termination
  • NLOS requirements
  • The way ahead
  • 12:40 Lunch

    13:40 FRENCH INDIRECT FIRE SUPPORT

    Colonel Daniel Hubscher

    Colonel Daniel Hubscher, Director for Field Artillery and Air Defence Studies and Development, French Artillery School

  • An overview of future concepts and requirements and the role of indirect fires in the near future
  • The induced tactical requirements
  • An overview of current artillery systems
  • A short look at the on-going studies and developments
  • CAESAR - What are the aims and objectives of the system?
  • How the CAESAR system is equipped for independent operations
  • 14:20 MODERNISATION PROGRAM OF THE M109 HOWITZER

    Wim de Ruijter

    Wim de Ruijter, Project Manager, M109L52 Development, RDM-Technology

  • An overview of the improved performance M109
  • Performance comparable to modern howitzers
  • Increased firepower with the new 155mm L52 ordinance
  • Improvement of the autonomous combat capabilities
  • 15:00 WEAPON LOCATING SYSTEMS

  • History / development
  • Capabilities
  • Advantages and disadvantages
  • Future objects
  • Lieutenant Colonel Nils Arne Skaret

    Lieutenant Colonel Nils Arne Skaret, Chief of Staff, Norwegian Field Artillery School

    Major Jostein Moen

    Major Jostein Moen, Chief Sensor Department, Norwegian Field Artillery School

    15:40 Afternoon Tea

    16:20 WEAPON LOCATING RADAR

    Baard Frostad

    Baard Frostad, Senior Adviser,Artillery Systems, Ericsson Microwave Systems

  • Scenarios, development of indirect fire and mission types
  • Basic requirements
  • Weapon locating sensors
  • Tactical implementation
  • Future development
  • 16:40 TARGET ACQUISITION ACCURACY

    Ian Mitchell

    Ian Mitchell, Sales and Marketing Director, Instro Precision

  • The requirement for accuracy
  • The error budget
  • Current capabilities
  • Future developments
  • 17:20 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-registration & Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Christopher Foss

    Christopher Foss, International Armoured Fighting Vehicle Expert and Author,

    9:10 KEYNOTE ADDRESS

    Colonel Nathaniel H Sledge

    Colonel Nathaniel H Sledge, PM CAS, United States Army

  • Insensitive munitions strategy
  • Addressing shelf life and requirements
  • Development, production and life cycle management
  • Horizontal technology insertion, opportunities for artillery
  • Pursue upgrade stock pile
  • Analyse impact of Army transportation in cannon artillery
  • 9:40 WEAPON SYSTEMS

    Lieutenant Colonel Paul Myrick

    Lieutenant Colonel Paul Myrick, Product Manager, M270A1 Improved Launcher, United States Army

  • Suppression, neutralization and destruction of threat fire support
  • Capabilities of the M270A1 MLRS
  • Operational requirements of the M270A1 MLRS
  • Upgrading the weapon system
  • 10:20 LOGISTIC SUPPORT OF FIELD ARTILLERY

    Stuart Smeeth

    Stuart Smeeth, Field Artillery Systems Support, Integrated Project Team Leader, DLO

  • IPT integration
  • DLO strategic goal
  • IPT restructuring and re-skilling
  • Beyond the strategic goal
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 ARTILLERY WEAPON AND AMMUNITION - FUTURE TECHNOLOGICAL TRENDS

    Dr Josef Kruse

    Dr Josef Kruse, Director, Future Programmes, Rheinmetall W&M

  • Precision enhancement
  • Weapon improvement
  • ETC plasma ignition
  • HPM submunition
  • 12:00 PRECISION INDIRECT FIRES

    Colonel (Ret’d) Frank Hartline

    Colonel (Ret’d) Frank Hartline, Senior Business Development Manager, Raytheon Guided Projectiles

  • Resurrecting the King of Battle
  • Precision Guided Munition (PGM) capabilities and
  • limitations
  • Current PGM programmes and issues
  • Indirect fires for the US Army interim & objectives
  • 12:40 Lunch

    14:00 LU 211

    Raymond Mensil

    Raymond Mensil, Ammunition Programme Manager, Giat Industries

  • 52-calibre compatibility
  • Modularity (HB & BB versions)
  • MURAT* insensitive ammunition
  • Anti-infrastructure capabilities
  • 14:40 COSTING FORECASTING OF INDIRECT FIRE SYSTEMS

    Peter Cook

    Peter Cook, Managing Director, HVR Consulting Services

  • Requirement for early estimates of whole life costs
  • Accuracy of current methods
  • Overview of the FACET model
  • Application of FACET to an indirect fire system
  • 15:20 Electronic Safety & Arming Device (ESAD) for the International GMLRS Weapon System

    William Kurtz

    William Kurtz, Marketing Manager, L-3 Communications/KDI Precision Products

    16:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Conference - Followed by Afternoon Tea

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