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SMi’s Second Annual Conference on Contractor Logistics Support will address the critical areas of Military Integrated Logistics and examine how current and future logistical support will be provided for the battlefield of the 21st century. This event will examine the growing trend to contract out Military Logistical Support to commercial companies. It will address the country specific policies and look at how commercial companies will provide logistical support to meet the Military’s needs.

CLS 2003 will examine the role of CONDO (Contractors on Deployed Operations) and LOGCAP (Logistics Civilian Augmentation Program) in evaluating the role of the contractors in the battlefield. It will also examine the advantages and disadvantages of this trend and look at the future of logistics support. Contractor Logistics Support will give case studies on the logistical policies and requirements from individual countries as well as detailing how they will provide logistical support in the future operational environment.

The afternoon of day 2 will consists of two stream sessions: Stream A: Supply Chain Management and Stream B: Life Cycle Costing. Delegates will have a choice of attending one of the two concurrent sessions. Following the stream sessions, the delegates will re-group to finish the conference with a look at the future of Contractor Logistics Support. Contractor Logistics Support has played a major role in sustaining the forces and contributed to successful missions in the past. It will play an increasingly important role in future deployments.

Gain an insight from key industry speakers from the field including:
  • Colonel Toby Mills, Engineering and Asset Management Capability Change Team Leader (E&AM CCTL), Defence Logistics Organisation, Ministry of Defence, UK
  • Lieutenant Colonel David Johnson, Project Team Leader, LARO 1, CTS, Logistics Analysis and Research Organisation, Defence Logistics Organisation, Ministry of Defence, UK
  • Wing Commander Alan Thompson, Head of CONDO Policy Unit, Defence Logistics Organisation, Ministry of Defence, UK
  • Don Trautner, Program Manager, Logistics Civil Augmentation Programme, LOGCAP, Operations Support Command, Army Materiel Command, US Army
  • Gordon Campbell, Principal Deputy to the Commanding General for Acquisition, Combined Arms Support Command, US Army
  • Randy King, Contractors Accompanying the Force, Program Manager, US Army G-4
  • Lieutenant Colonel Hans Eriksson, Program Director, Integrated Logistics Support Systems, FMV
  • Amy Burrison, Chief, Exercise Branch, Plans, Operations & Readiness Directorate Office of Deputy Chief of Staff, G-4, US Army
  • Sandy Ellis, Focused Logistics Warfighting (FLOW) Program Manager, Defense Logistics Agency
  • Dr Helen Peck, Senior Research Fellow & Project Manager - Supply Chain Resilience, Centre for Logistics and Supply Chain Management, Cranfield School of Management
  • Dr Derek Wright, Visiting Professor, Acquisition & Logistics Unit, Dept of Defence Management & Security, Royal Military College of Science, Cranfield University
  • David Clarke, Director, Defence, National Audit Office


  • REVIEW country specific policy and doctrine
    EXPLORE the fundamental issues surrounding CONDO and LOGCAP
    DISCOVER the current capabilities and review concepts under future consideration
    IDENTIFY developments in logistics support on the battlefield of the 21st century
    BENEFIT from the supply chain management and life cycle costing stream sessions
    MAXIMISE cost efficiency for operations
    DEVELOP key contacts through this focused networking forum

    Conference programme

    8:30 Registration & Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Brigadier (Ret’d) Frank Steer MBE

    Brigadier (Ret’d) Frank Steer MBE, Director General, Institute of Quality Assurance, Former Director of Army Equipment Support, DLO, Ministry of Defence, UK

    9:10 EXAMINING THE ROLE OF THE CONTRACTOR ON THE BATTLEFIELD

    Wing Commander Alan Thompson

    Wing Commander Alan Thompson, Head of CONDO Policy Unit, Defence Logistics Organisation, Ministry of Defence, UK

  • An explanation of CONDO and how it interfaces with contractors
  • The role of contractors in deployed operations
  • Application of CONDO policy to CLS contracts
  • What is the current direction of CONDO in the short and long term?
  • 9:40 CONTRACTORS ON THE BATTLEFIELD

    Gordon Campbell

    Gordon Campbell, Principal Deputy to the Commanding General for Acquisition, Combined Arms Support Command, US Army

  • Historical perspective
  • Framework: types of contractors
  • Deployability spectrum and planning considerations
  • Visibility, control and authority
  • Contractor personnel: status, location, uniforms and weapons
  • Contractible functions and core capabilities
  • Evolving policy and doctrine: the road ahead
  • 10:20 CIVILIAN SERVICES WORKING WITH THE MILITARY

    Don Trautner

    Don Trautner, Program Manager, Logistics Civil Augmentation Program, LOGCAP, Operations Support Command, Army Material Command , US Army

  • Maximising services and resources of civilian contracted firms – the world-wide planning and services contract
  • LOGCAP aiding the US peace-keeping operations
  • Making contingency plans more efficient
  • Case study: contractor support in Bosnia/Afghanistan/Iraq
  • The way forward – continued augmentation of the military logistics force
  • 11:00 Morning coffee

    11:20 THE SWEDISH CONTRACTOR LOGISTICS SUPPORT INVOLVEMENT

    Lieutenant Colonel Hans Eriksson

    Lieutenant Colonel Hans Eriksson, Programmes Director, Integrated Logistics Support Systems, FMV

  • The Swedish Armed Forces and its logistics chain
  • Reasons for introducing CLS in Sweden
  • The evolution of CLS in Sweden
  • Factors for consideration during the implementation of CLS in military operations
  • The future implementation of CLS
  • 12:00 PROMULGATION OF CONTRACTOR MANAGEMENT POLICY

    Randal Lewis

    Randal Lewis, Senior Logistics Analyst for Contractors Accompanying The Force, SYTEX

  • Current contractor support initiatives
  • Developing new policy for management
  • Implementation of new policies and doctrine
  • Effective relationships with contractor management
  • Contractor personnel accountability and visibility on the battlefield
  • 12:40 Networking Lunch Sponcered by LSC Group

    13:40 THE BENEFITS OF PERFORMANCE-BASED LOGISTICS

    Dr David Langness

    Dr David Langness, Programme Manager, Partnerships & New Ventures, PW/IdeAS, Boeing

  • The adoption of performance based contracting approaches to ensure enhanced logistics support
  • Types of Performance-Based Logistics contracting vehicles
  • Selected commercial strategies that assist in the re-engineering of military logistics at reduced costs
  • Delivering world-class military logistics and life cycle support
  • Enabling greater flexibility and readiness to the warfighter
  • Avoiding the pitfalls of traditional partnering and contractor logistics support
  • Lessons learned in developing PBL programmes
  • 14:20 ONE COMPANY, ONE TEAM

    Andy Tamlyn

    Andy Tamlyn, Support Engineering Manager, Lockheed Martin UK Integrated Systems

  • Addressing the diverse range of logistics and support related opportunities within the DLO
  • Approaches to prime contractor support
  • Leveraging synergies in DLO infrastructure
  • Maximising diversity within the corporation to bring world class best of breed solutions to bear
  • Transatlantic collaboration and technology transfer
  • The realities of moving up the support food chain
  • 15:00 CONTRACTOR LOGISTIC SUPPORT

    Clive Bullen

    Clive Bullen, Asset Management Solutions Director, LSC Group

  • Knowing your contractual obligations and mapping against capability
  • Means for the selection of suitable candidates for CLS
  • Optimising CLS contracts
  • Positioning of tools and applications for external and internal CLS management
  • Specialised CLS modelling techniques and their application
  • Moving forward from CLS to capability management
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    16:00 JSF AUTONOMIC LOGISTICS

    Phillip Hodge

    Phillip Hodge, Auto Logs Integration Manager, JSF/F35 Programme, BAE SYSTEMS

  • Programme / LM team overview
  • Technical / product overview
  • Autonomic logistics vision
  • Concept overview
  • Progress to date
  • 16:40 ACHIEVING CLS THROUGH EFFECTIVE ASSET MANAGEMENT

    Ian Jackson

    Ian Jackson, UK Defence & Aerospace Account Director, Spirent Systems

  • Mapping the enterprise
  • Configuration management and as-maintained baseline
  • Integrating the platform for usage and life cycle cost tracking
  • CLS performance and platform availability measurement
  • Total asset visibility
  • 17:20 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    17:30 Drinks reception for delegates and speakers

    8:30 Re-registration & Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Sir Colin Terry

    Sir Colin Terry, Chairman, Engineering Council & Aerospace Consultant, Conrad Grindley Associates

    9:10 SUPPORTING ENGINEERING AND ASSET MANAGEMENT CLS ACTIVITY

    Colonel Toby Mills

    Colonel Toby Mills, Engineering and Asset Management Capability Change Team Leader (E&AM CCTL), Defence Logistics Organisation, Ministry of Defence, UK

  • Moving from provider to decider
  • Availability- based contract requirements
  • Supporting HUMS
  • Data exchange standards
  • JAMES
  • 9:40 MULTI-NATIONAL LOGISTICS SUPPORT IN A THEATER OF OPERATIONS

    Amy Burrison

    Amy Burrison, Chief, Exercise Branch, Plans, Operations & Readiness Directorate Office of Deputy Chief of Staff, G-4, US Army

  • Logistics challenges in joint and coalition operations
  • Future logistics enterprise and logistics initiatives
  • Logistics enterprise integration and interoperability
  • Logistics goal: globally integrate and synchronize logistics
  • Coalition theater logistics initiatives
  • 10:20 DELIVERING BUSINESS ADVANTAGE THROUGH TAILORED CLS SOLUTIONS

  • CLS solution market developments
  • Demonstrable US and UK/European experiences
  • Lessons learned in light of recent experiences and new solutions offered
  • Development of CLS business models
  • Simulation and modelling of the desired results
  • Delivery of business advantage
  • Graham Grose

    Graham Grose, Director Strategy, Sales & Marketing, IFS Defence

    Jeff Pike

    Jeff Pike, Senior Consultant, IFS Defence

    11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 MONITORING CLS IN AN IN-SERVICE ENVIRONMENT

    John Krumins

    John Krumins, Senior Consultant, Trials Line of Business, BMT Reliability Consultants

  • Why monitor CLS?
  • How does it help both the supplier and consumer?
  • The requirement
  • Data sources - are normal line management processes sufficient?
  • Methodology - the need to buy in the user/maintainer
  • Examples
  • Lessons learned
  • 12:00 LESSONS LEARNED FROM OPERATION TELIC

    David Clarke

    David Clarke, Director, Defence, National Audit Office

  • The role of the NAO
  • The NAO's Operation Telic study
  • The role of contractors on Operation Telic
  • What worked well and what did not
  • The future
  • 12:40 Networking Lunch (Choose to follow one of the two streams)

    16:00 Afternoon Tea (Streams Regroup)

    16:20 ASSESSING THE SOLUTIONS REQUIRED TO SUPPORT THE FUTURE MILITARY OPERATIONAL CONCEPTS

    Sandy Ellis

    Sandy Ellis, Focused Logistics Warfighting (FLOW) Program Manager, Defense Logistics Agency (Coker Logistics Solutions)

  • Using FLOW as a tool to assess focused logistics and the joint logistics capability
  • Meeting the challenges of the 21st Century: focused logistics support concepts as they relate to the global war on terrorism
  • Using the integration of joint logistics analytical efforts to establish future global mobility solutions
  • Assessing the adequacy of forces, policy and doctrine for the future
  • Providing solutions for future logistical support to make warfighters a success
  • 17:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

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    Workshops

    Application of Contractor Logistic Support within the MoD Environment
    Workshop

    Application of Contractor Logistic Support within the MoD Environment

    London Marriott Hotel Grosvenor Square
    19th November 2003
    London, United Kingdom

    London Marriott Hotel Grosvenor Square

    Grosvenor Square
    London W1K 6JP
    United Kingdom

    London Marriott Hotel Grosvenor Square

    HOTEL BOOKING FORM

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

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