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The present dominant agenda in military forces all across the globe is ongoing transformation, and the dominant element in this transformation is military information systems. Empowered by new electronics technologies, these systems and their capabilities are defining the emerging configuration and missions. Information is, more than ever, a vital weapon in every warfighter’s armoury. Today’s and tomorrow’s commanders must have the right information, in the right place, at the right time in order to react first and decisively.

Information age battle command requires comprehensive capabilities and connectivity across the force, to gain significant increases in lethality, survivability and tempo. It is the aim of this conference to offer insight into the concepts and processes that exist and are being developed to achieve this. The event will address the question of battle management doctrine, focusing on areas such as interoperability, survivability, network-centricity and multilateral C4I. There will be coverage of current structures and processes, among them information management, logistical issues and combat identification initiatives. Human factors within C4I will also be analysed, with a focus on training, experimentation and the constraints of the man-machine interface. In addition, an overview of battle management equipment capabilities will be conducted, evaluating the performance, progress and future initiatives of C4I systems from across the international community.

Benefits of Attending:
· ENHANCE your understanding of battle management C4I in the information age battlespace
· IDENTIFY emerging battle management concepts, doctrine and processes
· EXAMINE the tenets, capability and architecture of C4I
· GAIN insight into initiatives at joint, coalition and international level
· UNCOVER the contemporary debate surrounding the challenges of the man-machine interface

A unique opportunity to hear international case studies and expert perspectives from leaders in the field including:
· Major General Gordon Nash, Commander, Joint Warfighting Center, US Joint Forces Command*
· Group Captain Paul Colley, Assistant Director Concepts, Joint Doctrine and Concepts Centre, Ministry of Defence, UK
· Colonel Rob Weighill, Assistant Director Concepts, Directorate General Doctrine and Development, Ministry of Defence, UK
· Colonel Neil Baverstock, Deputy Director, Command and Battlespace Management, Ministry of Defence, UK
· Colonel Simon Shadbolt, Deputy Director, J6 Policy, Ministry of Defence, UK
· Colonel Jonathan Campbell-James, VCDS CBM ISR Study Leader, Defence Intelligence Staff, UK
· Colonel Stephen Bond, TRADOC System Manager for J-STARS, CGS and DCGS-A, US Army
· Lieutenant Colonel Steve Anderson, SO1 Requirements, Defence Geographic and Imagery Intelligence Agency, Ministry of Defence, UK
· Lieutenant Colonel Lars Lindberg, Deputy Commander, Swedish Defence Wargaming Centre
· Lieutenant Colonel Merfyn Lloyd OBE, SO1 CBM, DSTL
· Major Rick Lykins USMC, C4 Branch Head, Technology Division, US Marine Corps Warfighting Laboratory
· Dr Roland Edwards, DEC CC&II, Tac CBMSc, Ministry Of Defence, UK, and DTL Human Sciences Group, DSTL
* Subject to Final Confirmation

“Very interesting. Overall a very good conference”
Lieutenant Colonel Gregory Hoscheit PhD, Chief C4I Division, US Army Space and Missile Defense Battle Lab Delegate at 2002 Battle Management C4I Conference

Conference programme

8:30 Registration and Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Professor Christopher Elliott CB MBE

Professor Christopher Elliott CB MBE, Director Doctrine and Strategic Analysis, General Dynamics UK

9:10 THE FUTURE BATTLESPACE – REDEFINING C4I

Group Captain Paul Colley

Group Captain Paul Colley, Assistant Director Concepts, Joint Doctrine and Concepts Centre, Ministry of Defence, UK

  • The UK’s emerging Joint High Level Operational Concept: the conceptual head mark; effects based operations; the future battlespace
  • Operational agility
  • Achieving a balance between information deficit and information overload; the dilemma of equivocality
  • Future Command and Control: command intent; adaptive C2; mission command in the information age
  • The relationship between reach, responsiveness and robustness
  • Tactical innovation
  • 9:50 INFORMATION MANAGEMENT AND EXPLOITATION

    Colonel Neil Baverstock

    Colonel Neil Baverstock, Deputy Director, Command and Battlespace Management, Ministry of Defence, UK

  • Overview of the UK approach to information management
  • Emerging UK thinking on future command and information management within the battlespace
  • Future joint operations
  • The UK approach to information management in the medium and long term, including the joint operational picture
  • 10:30 C4I FOR MULTINATIONAL AND COALITION OPERATIONS

    Dr Klaus Müller

    Dr Klaus Müller, , Independent Consultant on Military Information Systems

  • Future operations of NATO countries will be mainly in coalition (not Alliance environments)
  • Consequences for C4I
  • Today’s information sharing challenges in coalition operations - why NATO and coalition forces cannot exchange information over networks - why separate networks are built for each coalition member
  • The future – goals and solution approaches - protecting information, not networks - architecture designs for efficient sharing of information of different sensitivities - supporting communities of interest - NATO approaches to multi-domain intelligence exchange - the COSINE project – Coalition Shared Intelligence Network Environment
  • 11:10 Morning Coffee

    11:30 BMC4I ARCHITECTURE DEFINITION FOR COALITION BASED OPERATIONS

    Dr Hans E. Keus

    Dr Hans E. Keus, Program Manager Maritime C4I, TNO-FEL

  • Challenges of coalition operations
  • The Maritime Theater Missile Defense Forum Initiative
  • The international BMC4I working group
  • Interoperability as enabler for coalition-based net-centric functions
  • MTMD BMC4I architecture concepts
  • National shortfall determination
    Relations with other initiatives
  • 12:10 NETWORK-ENABLED CAPABILITY

    Lieutenant Colonel Merfyn Lloyd OBE

    Lieutenant Colonel Merfyn Lloyd OBE, SO1 CBM, DSTL

  • Why: the doctrinal drivers
  • How: the NEC conceptual framework
  • Who: agile mission groups
  • Can it work: an information age command model
  • Will it work: people, opinions and culture
  • 12:50 Networking Lunch

    14:00 ISR INFORMATION MANAGEMENT

    Colonel Jonathan Campbell-James

    Colonel Jonathan Campbell-James, VCDS CBM ISR Study Leader, Defence Intelligence Staff, UK

  • The VCDS CDM ISR Study
  • Who owns ISR assets?
  • How are UK ISR assets managed?
  • The future – an ISR capability framework
  • Improvements/change under consideration
  • 14:40 PANEL DISCUSSION

  • With participation from:
  • Colonel Neil Baverstock

    Colonel Neil Baverstock, Deputy Director, Command and Battlespace Management, Ministry of Defence, UK

    Dr Klaus Müller

    Dr Klaus Müller, , Independent Consultant on Military Information Systems

    Dr Hans E. Keus

    Dr Hans E. Keus, Program Manager Maritime C4I, TNO-FEL

    15:20 NATO’S CONTRIBUTION TO ELIMINATING FRATRICIDE

    Richard Froh

    Richard Froh, Head, Land Armaments Section, Defence Investment Division, NATO

  • Historical context
  • Challenge of combined joint operations
  • Approaches to combat identification in 3 dimensions
  • Battlefield Target Identification System
  • Dismounted Soldier Combat Identification
  • Relation to situational awareness
    Looking to the future
  • 16:00 Afternoon Tea

    16:20 USMC LITTORAL WARFARE BATTLE MANAGEMENT

    Colonel Nick Cusack

    Colonel Nick Cusack, C4 Project Officer, US Marine Corps Warfighting Laboratory

  • Lessons learned from Operation Iraqi Freedom
  • Sea Viking ’04 Advanced Warfighting Experiment (AWE) - Ship-to-Objective Maneuver (STOM) - Expeditionary Tactical Comms System (ETCS) - Digital Combat Operations Center (DCOC) - Command and Control Integration (CCI) - On the Move Combat Operations Center (OTM COC) - Collaborative planning - Fires C2 - Logistics C2
  • 17:00 C4I SURVIVABILITY

    Colonel Simon Shadbolt

    Colonel Simon Shadbolt, Deputy Director, J6 Policy, Ministry of Defence, UK

  • The importance of analysing C4I survivability
  • Threat definition and analysis, risk assessment and protection recommendations
  • Operational survivability - associated vulnerabilities - incorporating resilience and recoverability - importance of non-materiel solutions - protect, detect, restore
  • Survivability enhancement – technologies, programmes and initiatives
  • 17:40 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Colonel (Ret’d) Jeremy Barrett

    Colonel (Ret’d) Jeremy Barrett, Head of Strategic Development, Hi-Q Systems

    9:10 LAND C2 WITHIN THE DIGITIZED BATTLEFIELD

    Colonel Rob Weighill

    Colonel Rob Weighill, Assistant Director Concepts, Directorate General Doctrine and Development, Ministry of Defence, UK

  • Core concepts of mission command, knowledge superiority, intelligence theory and application of networking techniques
  • Land operations and C2 in the information age - agile balance force approach - effects-based operations - network-enabled capability - directed logistics
  • Achieving vertical and horizontal integration of the digital battlespace
  • What lies ahead
  • 9:40 ENABLING BATTLESPACE DOMINANCE INTO THE FUTURE

    Colonel Stephen J Bond

    Colonel Stephen J Bond, TRADOC System Manager Joint STARS, Common Ground Station, Distributed Common Ground System-Army, US Army, TRADOC

  • The value of wide-area surveillance
  • Common Ground Station capabilities
  • Network-centric ISR for the future: DCGS-A
  • 10:20 COALITION INEROPERABILITY IN A NETWORK CENTRIC WORLD

    Heinz Winter

    Heinz Winter, Senior System Consultant, Northrop Grumman Information Technology

    11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 ENVIRONMENTAL INFORMATION

    Lieutenant Colonel Steve Anderson

    Lieutenant Colonel Steve Anderson, SO1 Requirements, Defence Geographic and Imagery Intelligence Agency, Ministry of Defence, UK

  • Developments in environmental fusion
  • Requisite mapping/imagery capabilities - data sources and acquisition - data fusion - environmental interpretation - all sources fusion - decision superiority
  • Environmental information
  • Technical status
  • Project overview
  • 12:00 IMAGERY DATA COLLECTION AND MANAGEMENT

    David Carter

    David Carter, Head of Reconnaissance, AstriumEarth Observation and Science UK

  • Contribution of synthetic aperture radar to situational awareness
  • Forward-looking trends in space and high altitude SAR systems
  • Data needs for information extraction
  • Considerations for information availability and dissemination
  • 12:40 Networking Lunch

    14:00 NATO AGS IN SUPPORT OF NETWORK ENABLED CAPABILITY

    James Moseman

    James Moseman, Director Europe & NATO, Hi-Q Systems

    14:40 C4I SIMULATION AND MODELLING

    Jeremy Smith

    Jeremy Smith, Senior Lecturer, Royal Military College of Science, UK Defence Academy, Cranfield University

  • The role of synthetic environments in C4I
  • Use of simulation in C2 training and assessment
  • Interoperability, responsiveness and reuse
  • Future battle-space capability
  • The way forward
  • 15:20 HUMAN FACTOR CHALLENGES TO C4I

    Dr Roland Edwards

    Dr Roland Edwards, DEC CC&II, Tac CBMSc /and DTL Human Sciences Group , Ministry of Defence, UK / DSTL

  • Human factors in C4I
  • The problems of the human-machine interface
  • Achieving situational understanding, not just awareness
  • Susceptibility to breakdown
    Vulnerability to enemy exploitation, beacons and signatures
  • Bandwidth, power and logistic problems
    Cultural issues
  • Demands of the different arms and problems at joint, interagency and coalition-level
    The way forward
  • 16:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

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