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SMi's 3rd annual Contractor Logistics Support Conference will address the critical areas of Military logistics support and examine how current and future logistical support will be provided for the battlefield of the 21st century.

It will examine the growing trend to contract out logistical support to commercial companies, addressing country specific policies. Commercial companies will provide case studies illustrating examples of contractor support for the operational environment.

This event will examine the role of CONDO (Contractors on Deployed Operations) and LOGCAP (Logistics Civilian Augmentation Program) in evaluating the role of the contractors in the battlefield. It will also examine the advantages and disadvantages of this trend and look at the future of logistics support. Contractor Logistics Support has played a major role in sustaining the forces and contributed to successful missions in the past. It will play an increasingly important role in future deployments.

A unique opportunity to learn from leading experts including:

  • Colonel Toby Mills, Engineering AND Asset Management Capability Change Team Leader, Defence Logistics Organisation, Ministry of Defence, UK
  • Colonel Graham Hughes, Chief Engineer, Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers, British Army
  • Colonel Jon Brittain, Commanding Officer, 7 Air Assault Battalion, Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers, British Army
  • Colonel Mike McMahon, Assistant Director Plans Branch, Assistant Chief of Defence Staff (Logistics Operations), Ministry of Defence, UK
  • Lieutenant Colonel Douglas LaBrie, Senior Staff Officer Contracts, Headquarters, Canadian Forces Joint Support Group
  • Lieutenant Colonel Jim Greaves, SO1 J4 CONLOG, PJHQ, Ministry of Defence, UK
  • Herbert Abela, Director, CONLOG Programme, KBR
  • Lieutenant Colonel David Johnson REME, Senior Project Officer, Logistics Analysis and Research Organisation (LARO), Corporate Technical Services, Defence Logistics Organisation, Ministry of Defence, UK
  • Lieutenant Colonel David Painter, Head of Future MoD Business, ABRO
  • Lieutenant Commander John Rees, Assistant Director Acquisition Support (Air), Future Support Environment, Defence Logistics Organisation, Ministry of Defence, UK
  • Commander Gary Broadwell, Action Officer on the Joint Staff, Joint Staff (J4)/SAIL, Department of Defense, US
  • Denis Hoyland, Assistant Director, Corporate Technical Services CSS

Benefits of Attending:
REVIEW country specific policy and doctrine
EXPLORE the fundamental issues surrounding CONDO and LOGCAP
DISCOVER the current capabilities and review concepts under future consideration
IDENTIFY developments in logistics support on the battlefield of the 21st century
BENEFIT from the supply chain management and life cycle costing stream sessions
MAXIMISE cost efficiency for operations
DEVELOP key contacts through this focused network

Conference programme

8:30 Registration & Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Colonel Toby Mills

Colonel Toby Mills, Engineering and Asset Management Capability Change Team Leader Leader, Defence Logistics Organisation, , Ministry of Defence, UK

9:10 CONTRACTORS ON DEPLOYED OPERATIONS (CONDO)

Colonel Mike McMahon

Colonel Mike McMahon, Assistant Director Plans Branch, Assistant Cheif of Defence Staff (Logistics Operations), Ministry of Defence, UK

  • Background and operational requirements
  • Current policy and related issues
  • Recent policy developments
  • Future policy developments
  • 9:50 CONLOG - CONTRACTORS FOR LOGISTIC SUPPORT

  • Introduction to the CONLOG Contract and why it exists
  • The principle aims of CONLOG
  • The development work from preferred bidder to contract award, including the need of establishing an early customer/client relationship
  • The involvement of the customer in contract negotiations
  • The development and importance of partnering principles
  • MOD and KBR views on why the partnering within the CONLOG contract are likely to succeed
  • Lieutenant Colonel Jim Greaves

    Lieutenant Colonel Jim Greaves, SO1 J4 CONLOG, PJHQ,, Ministry of Defence, UK

    Herbert Abela

    Herbert Abela, Director, CONLOG Programme, KBR

    10:30 Morning Coffee

    11:00 CANCAP – CANADIAN FORCES CONTRACTOR AUGMENTATION PROGRAMME

    Lieutenant Colonel Douglas LaBrie

    Lieutenant Colonel Douglas LaBrie, Senior Staff Officer Contracts, Headquarters, Canadian Forces Joint Support Group

  • Background to the origins of Canadian initiatives
  • Current support framework for contractors
  • Future material support initiatives
  • coherently achieving control of contractors deployed for joint forces
  • Recent experiences in the Balkans and Afghanistan
  • The framework for support for future operations
  • Conclusions
  • 11:40 USING CONTRACTORS ON THE BATTLEFIELD (CoB)

    Commander Gary Broadwell

    Commander Gary Broadwell, Action Officer on the Joint Staff, Joint Staff (J4)/SAIL, Department of Defense, US

  • A short history including Operation Iraqi Freedom
  • Key US factors leading to the increase in CoB
  • Major policy issues needing to be resolved on CoB
  • force protection of/from contractors
  • weapons use and personal firearms
  • medical coverage, immunisations, casualty care
  • criminal jurisdiction
  • contractor visibility
  • need for standardised contract clauses
  • Challenge and importance of establishing overarching US Department of Defense policy to address CoB
  • Major policy issues needing to be resolved on CoB
  • force protection of/from contractors
  • weapons use and personal firearms
  • medical coverage, immunisations, casualty care
  • criminal jurisdiction
  • contractor visibility
  • need for standardised contract clauses
  • Challenge and importance of establishing overarching US Department of Defense policy to address CoB
  • Major policy issues needing to be resolved on CoB
  • force protection of/from contractors
  • weapons use and personal firearms
  • medical coverage, immunisations, casualty care
  • criminal jurisdiction
  • contractor visibility
  • need for standardised contract clauses
  • Challenge and importance of establishing overarching US Department of Defense policy to address CoB
  • 12:20 Networking Lunch

    13:50 CASE STUDY BALKANS

    Steven Sternlieb

    Steven Sternlieb, Assistant Director, United States Government Accountability Office

  • Overview of the use of contractors in the Balkans
  • the extent of contractor support in the Balkans and its growth from 1995-2003
  • why contractors have played a growing role
  • the Army’s management of contractor support
  • the importance of capturing lessons learned
  • How the lessons learned and experiences can and should be used in current operations such as in Iraq and in future operations and peacekeeping missions
  • Future of contractor support in the Balkans
  • 14:30 CONTRACTOR SUPPORT FOR THE STRYKER BRIGADE

    Randy King

    Randy King, Program Manager, Contractors Accompanying the Force, US Army

    Randal Lewis

    Randal Lewis, Senior Logistics Analyst, Sytex, Inc

    15:10 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 DESIGN, DELIVERY AND OPTIMISATION OF CONTRACTOR LOGISTICS SUPPORT SOLUTIONS

    Ben Bonnick

    Ben Bonnick, Business Development Manager, Asset Management Solutions, LSC Group

  • Understanding the requirement
  • Risk assessment and management
  • Measurement of support strategies against traditional support and cost baselines
  • Positioning of tools and applications for external and internal CLS management
  • Information management and sharing across the entreprise
  • Progressive optimisation through in service data analysis and modelling
  • Moving forward from CLS to capability management
  • 16:20 RISK IN MILITARY SUPPLY CHAINS

    Brigadier General (Ret'd) Robert Mansfield Jr

    Brigadier General (Ret'd) Robert Mansfield Jr, Practice Leader, Supply Chain Engineering, Altarum Institute

  • Military supply chains provide a unique set of outcomes as compared to commercial ones
  • Failure in military supply chains are more likely to have significant impacts as compared to commercial supply chains
  • Performance based logistics offer great promise to improve military supply chain performance
  • Performance based logistics benefits must be evaluated not only by economic and performance goals, but by risk posed to military operations
  • 17:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    17:10 Networking Drinks Reception Sponsored by LSC GROUP

    8:30 Re-registration & Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Clive Bullen

    Clive Bullen, Asset Management Solutions Director, LSC Group

    9:10 CONTRACTOR SUPPORT IN MORE BENIGN ENVIRONMENTS

  • A view of how contractors might be able to take on routine in-barracks maintenance
  • How might that allow uniformed maintainers to be better prepared for the role that they are intended for?
  • How can contractors help to release uniformed maintainers from the heavy burden of deployed operations once the situation becomes more benign?
  • Colonel Graham Hughes

    Colonel Graham Hughes, Chief Engineer, Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers, British Army

    Colonel Jon Brittain

    Colonel Jon Brittain, Commanding Officer, 7 Air Assault Battalion, Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers, British Army

    9:50 FORWARD SUPPORT FOR MILITARY VEHICLES AND EQUIPMENT

    Lieutenant Colonel David Painter

    Lieutenant Colonel David Painter, Head of Future MoD Business Group, ABRO

  • Recent operational lessons
  • Changes in technology – HUMS and prognostics
  • The burden of legacy equipment
  • Recovery of repair
  • The future
  • Recent operational lessons
  • Changes in technology – HUMS and prognostics
  • The burden of legacy equipment
  • Recovery of repair
  • The future
  • 10:30 Morning Coffee

    11:00 SUPPORTING NAVAL INTEGRATED PROJECT TEAMS

    Geoff Buck

    Geoff Buck, Business Development Manager, DML Devonport Royal Dockyard Ltd.

  • The "Intelligent Provider"
  • "Intelligent" services that the provider can supply the decider
  • The "Waterfront Funnel"
  • waterfront activities as the focal point for support effort
  • re-organisation and the lessons being learned
  • Support processes and systems
  • digitising the back of a fag-packet
  • information who wants it and why?
  • 11:40 SEAMLESS LOGISTICS SUPPORT

    Denis Hoyland

    Denis Hoyland, Assistant Director, Corporate Technical Services CSS

  • The business of technical support
  • The customer requirements
  • The CSA – one agreement, many tasks
  • DLO CTS – the way forward
  • 12:20 Networking Lunch

    13:50 THE SUPPORT SOLUTIONS ENVELOPE - WHY WHAT AND HOW

    Lieutenant Commander John Rees

    Lieutenant Commander John Rees, Assistant Director Acquisition Support Air, Future Support Environment, Defence Logistics Organisation MOD

  • Background, purpose and governance of the SSE
  • Explanation of structure, scope and content
  • The requirement for and distinction between assesment, assurance and scrutiny
  • Through Life SSE?
  • SSE and innovation?
  • How to 'do SSE'
  • 14:30 FOCUSED LOGISTICS WARFIGHTING CAPABILITY ASSESSMENT (FLOW CA)

    Sandy Ellis

    Sandy Ellis, Program Maager, Focused Logistics Warfighting Capabilities Assessment (FLOW CA), Defense Logistics Agency (DLA)

  • The old analysis process
  • The new assessment process
  • Current status
  • How it’s working
  • Potential capabilities for study
  • Challenges
  • 15:10 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 WHOLE LIFE COSTING AND POSSIBLE EFFECTS ON ACQUISITION OF NEW SYSTEMS

    Erik Normann Warberg

    Erik Normann Warberg, Senior Adviser, Group for Industrial Strategy, Norweigan Defence Research Establishment

  • The effect on strategic decisions
  • How project management is affected
  • Involvement of stakeholders
  • Restrictions due to EU regulations
  • 16:20 DECISION MAKING THROUGH LIFE CYCLE COSTING

    Jason Mitchell

    Jason Mitchell, Research and Development Manager, Logistics Business Systems (LBS)

  • Introduction – the implications of decision making
  • Aims and objectives of availability and life cycle costing
  • Types of decisions and their implications
  • Types of trade-offs applicable to inform and support these decisions
  • The benefits of utilising a web-based integrated toolset
  • Finalising the decisions
  • 17:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day Two

    8:30 Re-registration & Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Dr David Moore

    Dr David Moore, Course Director, Defence Acquisition Management and Defence Logistics Management, Cranfield University, Royal Military College of Science, Defence Academy of the United Kingdom

    9:10 EFFECTIVE MANAGEMENT OF THE REPAIR LOOP

    Leiutenant Colonel David Johnson

    Leiutenant Colonel David Johnson, LARO Project Officer, Logistic Analysis & Research Organisation

  • Repairables; the various categories
  • The importance of repairables
  • Estimating future needs – activity forecasting & metrics
  • The MoD / industry interface
  • Ownership and supply chain management
  • 9:50 MAINTAINING THROUGH LIFE SUPPORT CAPABILITY

    Tony Fry

    Tony Fry, WSA DTECH WLS, Warship Support Agency, MoD

    10:30 Morning Coffee

    11:00 CONTRACTOR LOGISTIC SUPPORT OF WORKSHOP EQUIPMENT

    Julie Wookey

    Julie Wookey, Section Leader, Workshop Support Services IPT

  • The delivery layer
  • Developing solutions
  • Customer development
  • Implementing solutions
  • Supporting solutions
  • Disposal
  • 11:40 THE BUSINESS ANALYSIS TO AID THE DESIGN OF A CONTRACTOR LOGISTIC SUPPORT SOLUTION

    Julian Dayment

    Julian Dayment, Consultant, BAE SYSTEMS

  • Performing a business analysis of vendor contracting options
  • The identification of risk areas and the determination of mitigation options
  • The assessment of spares inventories and supply options
  • Addressing readiness and availability requirements
  • 12:20 FUTURE ISSUES FOR SUPPORT

    Dr Derek Wright

    Dr Derek Wright, Consultant/Visiting Fellow Cranfield University, Derek Wright Associates Ltd

  • Business risks
  • Managing suppliers
  • Maintaining value for money, output and sufficient levels of support at critical moments
  • Methods for managing these requirements
  • 13:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks

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    Workshops

    Information Exploitation for Effective CLS
    Workshop

    Information Exploitation for Effective CLS

    Jurys Great Russell Street Hotel
    24th November 2004
    London, United Kingdom

    Jurys Great Russell Street Hotel

    16-22 Great Russell Street
    London WC1B 3NN
    United Kingdom

    Jurys Great Russell Street Hotel

    HOTEL BOOKING FORM

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

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