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The continuous evolution and emergence of new capabilities, coupled with recent operational successes have precipitated the increased use of unmanned systems across the entire operational spectrum. Unmanned Vehicle Systems (UVs), in the form of unmanned aerial, ground and maritime combat vehicles, have become an integral part of modern military operations. Utilising UVs in the ‘Global War on Terror’ is seen as a way to minimise human death rate while maximising ISTAR capabilities within military operations.

With these capability advances has come the addition of new missions and expanded scope, resulting in new requirements and challenges for forces. Key areas influencing UVs currently include autonomous operations, decision-support software, contingency management, advanced communications, C2, battlespace and civil airspace interoperability and procurement cost.

The Future of UVs Conference will address the ongoing advancements in UVs, demonstrating current capability as well as the future developments enabling the warfighter faster access to intelligence information for capability exploitation. Lessons learned from recent conflict and experimentation will illustrate the successes in UAV ISTAR. The relationship between UV development and the network centric and network-enabled visions will also be discussed.

The Future of UVs will examine emerging global policies and concepts, discussing the challenges to UV transformation and integration on a national, multi-national and joint scale. Next generation technologies, systems and platforms will be assessed to identify where current UV capability gaps can be filled, as will legal implications of airspace management, UV global markets and future procurement opportunities for industry.

An international line up includes…

  • Colonel Michael Leahy, Material Group Director, Air Vehicles, Air Force Research Laboratory, US Air Force
  • Colonel Stephen Luxion, Chief, Combat Air Branch, Joint Air Power Competence Centre (NATO)
  • Captain Matt Sisson, Program Manager, Coast Guard Integrated Deepwater System, US Coast Guard
  • Colonel Eric Mathewson, Chief, UAV System Management Organization, A8P (Predator Division), US Air Force
  • Colonel Willie Nunn, Chief, High Altitude ISR Division, Directorate of Requirements, Air Combat Command, US Air Force
  • Richard Fisher, Deputy Product Manager, Future Force UAVs, PEO Aviation, US Army
  • Lieutenant Colonel Kevin Doyle, Director, Joint Capabilities Directorate, UAV Joint Project Office, National Defence HQ, Canada
  • Lieutenant Colonel John Mullin, UAV Capabilities Officer, Material Capabilities Division,  Marine Corps Combat Development Command, US Marine Corps
  • Lieutenant Colonel William L Wade, UAV Capabilities Officer, Material Capabilities Division, Marine Corps Combat Development Command, US Marine Corps
  • Lieutenant Colonel Edward Fabian Jr, Chief, Requirements, Battle Command and Awareness Division, Futures Center, TRADOC, US Army
  • Dr Wim Van Russom, Scientific Researcher, Radar and Electronic Warfare, TNO
  • Major Todd Lamb, Officer in Charge, OIF/OEF Joint Robotic Sustainment, Robotic Systems Joint Project Office, US Marine Corps
  • Major Armand Goossens, Technical Officer, MALE UAV, Royal Netherlands Air Force
  • Major William Treuting, Project Officer, Small Unit Remote Scouting System (SURSS), US Marine Corps
  • Major George Ehlers, UAV Capabilities Officer, Marine Corps Systems Command, US Marine Corps
  • Professor George Vachtsevanos, Professor, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology
  • Shai Shammai, Consulting Manager, Frost and Sullivan

With Special Guest Chair...

  • Professor Ian Poll OBE, Professor, Aerospace Engineering, Cranfield University, and Business Development and Technical Director, Cranfield Aerospace

Benefits of Attending The Future of UVs include…

  • CONSIDER emerging UV policies and concepts and the evolving role of the UV in the future battlespace
  • DISCUSS country specific and coalition/joint requirements for future UVs
  • EXAMINE the military and industrial advances in UVs technologies, systems and platforms
  • IDENTIFY military and commercial opportunities in UVs requirement capture, procurement and capability delivery
  • UNDERSTAND the importance of UVs to ISTAR Transformation and Network Centric and Effects Based Operations
  • GAIN important insight from and ASSESS the lessons learned from UVs used within Afghanistan, Iraq and recent cutting edge experimentation

Conference programme

8:30 Registration & Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Professor Ian Poll OBE

Professor Ian Poll OBE, Professor of Aerospace Engineering, Cranfield University, and Business Development and Technical Director, Cranfield Aerospace

9:10 AFRL VISION AND ROADMAP FOR FUTURE UAV/UCAV CAPABILITIES

Colonel Michael Leahy

Colonel Michael Leahy, Material Group Director, Air Vehicles, Air Force Research Laboratory, US Air Force

  • Current and emerging research requirements for UAVs
  • How are current events shaping future capability requirements?
  • Current efforts on UAV research and development – recent challenges and accomplishments
  • Looking forward 20 years, what should we expect?
  • 9:50 KEY ISSUES CONCERNING THE PROLIFERATION OF UAV/UCAV PROCUREMENT

    Lieutenant Colonel Daniel P Lewandowski

    Lieutenant Colonel Daniel P Lewandowski, Branch Head, Combat Air Branch, Joint Air Power Competence Centre, NATO, NATO

  • The current proliferation of UAVs - why this is occurring and why the need for these systems?
  • Problems with proliferation
  • Redundancy
  • Duplication of effort
  • Lack of expertise on the staffs in acquiring, commanding and controlling unmanned systems
  • Lack of co-ordination between aviation units, services, and nations
  • Can we avoid repeating history and mistakes of the past?
  • What are the operational advantages/disadvantages of UAVs/UCAVs versus other assets?
  • What is the proper mix of manned and unmanned capabilities?
  • How do we deconflict, or better still, properly integrate UAVs/UCAVs into the airspace and joint/multilateral ops?
  • How do we co-ordinate between the services and various nations of an alliance to acquire the required capabilities without unacceptable redundancy?
  • Conclusions
  • 10:30 Morning Coffee

    11:00 CANADIAN VISION AND CAMPAIGN PLAN FOR UNMANNED VEHICLES

  • Incorporating the UAV into future Canadian Forces strategy
  • Current and emerging requirements for UAVs
  • How are current events shaping future capability requirements?
  • Current efforts on UAV acquisition, research and development – recent challenges and accomplishments
  • Looking forward 20 years, what should we expect?
  • The future Canadian campaign plan and strategy for UVs
  • Lieutenant Colonel Kevin Doyle

    Lieutenant Colonel Kevin Doyle, Director, Joint Force Capabilities, UAV Joint Program Office, National Defence Headquaters, Canada

    11:40 ENHANCING USAF ISR – THE BLOCK 20 RQ-4 (FORMERLY KNOWN AS RQ-4B) GLOBAL HAWK

    Colonel Willie Nunn

    Colonel Willie Nunn, Chief, High Altitude ISR Division, Directorate of Requirements, Air Combat Command, US Air Force

  • What drove the requirement change from A to B?
  • The increased capability of the RQ-4B Global Hawk and its future role in the battlespace
  • Increased payload
  • Incorporating advanced SigInt and Multi-Int systems for maximum ISR
  • Future capabilities
  • 12:20 Networking Lunch

    13:50 THE MALE UAV WITHIN THE ROYAL NETHERHELANDS AIR FORCE

    Major Armand Goossens

    Major Armand Goossens, Technical Officer, MALE UAV Project Team, Royal Netherlands Air Force

  • Integrating a new operational capability – future operations of the MALE UAV within the Netherlands Defense Forces
  • Integration of MALE UAV in Netherlands and European airspace – ATM integration and certification of MALE UAV
  • Integrating the Human in the MALE UAV system
  • A conceptual Mission Management System – development and testing, the project currently and the results so far
  • 14:30 DRAGONEYE UAV

    Ronald Colbow

    Ronald Colbow, Systems Engineer, Small Unit Remote Scouting System (SURSS), US Marine Corps

  • How does it work? Current capabilities
  • Autonomous flight
  • Payloads
  • Lessons learned from USMC experience in Afghanistan
  • Operation Iraqi Freedom – what happened?
  • Future plans, what can we expect?
  • 15:10 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 MQ-9 PREDATOR B THE MULTI-SPECTRAL TARGETING SYSTEM

    Lieutenant Colonel Eric Mathewson

    Lieutenant Colonel Eric Mathewson, Chief, UAV System Management Organization, A8P (Predator Division), US Air Force

  • Programme updates, status and accomplishments
  • Tactical operations in Afghanistan – what happened?
  • What activities and actions can ensure successful operations?
  • What factors can lead to the failure of operations?
  • Lessons learned
  • 16:20 SPECIAL PANEL DISCUSSION

    Professor Ian Poll OBE

    Professor Ian Poll OBE, Professor of Aerospace Engineering, Cranfield University, and Business Development and Technical Director, Cranfield Aerospace

    Lieutenant Colonel Daniel P Lewandowski

    Lieutenant Colonel Daniel P Lewandowski, Branch Head, Combat Air Branch, Joint Air Power Competence Centre, NATO, NATO

    Major Armand Goossens

    Major Armand Goossens, Technical Officer, MALE UAV Project Team, Royal Netherlands Air Force

    Colonel Willie Nunn

    Colonel Willie Nunn, Chief, High Altitude ISR Division, Directorate of Requirements, Air Combat Command, US Air Force

    17:00 TITLE TO BE CONFIRMED (Subject to final confirmation)

    Professor Roland Decuypere

    Professor Roland Decuypere, Head of Department, Royal Military Academy

    8:30 Registration & Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Professor Ian Poll OBE

    Professor Ian Poll OBE, Professor of Aerospace Engineering, Cranfield University, and Business Development and Technical Director, Cranfield Aerospace

    9:10 US ARMY UAV PROGRAM UPDATE

    William I Nichols

    William I Nichols, Future Force UAVs, PEO Aviation, US Army

  • Current UAV capabilities
  • Future UAV requirements
  • Airspace integration
  • Long term goals and objectives
  • Challenges facing UAVs in the future
  • Looking forward 20 years, what should we expect?
  • 9:50 ROBOTIC SYSTEMS AND UVS

    Major Todd Lamb

    Major Todd Lamb, Officer in Charge, OIF/OEF Joint Robotic Sustainment, Robotic Systems Joint Project Office, US Marine Corps

  • Current and future research projects
  • UVs programme updates
  • Gladiator – use of TUGV in Iraq - what happened?
  • Future operations and capabilities
  • 10:30 Morning Coffee

    11:00 HOMELAND SECURITY WITHIN THE INTEGRATED DEEPWATER SYSTEM PROGRAM

    Captain Matt Sisson

    Captain Matt Sisson, Program Manager, Coast Guard Integrated Deepwater System, US Coast Guard

  • UAVs within the IDS program
  • 11:40 UAV TECHNOLOGY FOR FUTURE FORCES

  • Sensor perspective
  • Communication perspective
  • Current requirements and capabilities
  • Future work
  • Lieutenant Colonel Edward Fabian Jr

    Lieutenant Colonel Edward Fabian Jr, Chief, Requirements, Battle Command and Awareness Division, Futures Center, TRADOC, US Army

    Lieutenant Colonel (Ret'd) William Jones

    Lieutenant Colonel (Ret'd) William Jones, Intelligence Research analyst (GS-13), US Army

    12:20 Networking Lunch

    13:50 UTILISING SMALL TACTICAL UAVS WITHIN THE BATTLESPACE – A USMC PERSPECTIVE

    Lieutenant Colonel William L Wade

    Lieutenant Colonel William L Wade, UAV Capabilities Officer, Materiel Capabilities Division, Marine Corps Combat Development Command, US Marine Corps

  • Operating in harsh environments within an expeditionary force – what are the requirements?
  • UAVs within future operations; role and responsibilities
  • ScanEagle – from experimentation to deployment in theatre
  • Integrating UV technology and platforms – the challenges faced and overcome
  • 14:30 CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES FOR IMPROVED UAV AUTONOMY AND RELIABILITY

    Professor George J Vachtsevanos

    Professor George J Vachtsevanos, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute Of Technology

  • Concept of autonomy
  • UAV hardware and software for autonomous flight operations
  • Control strategies for improved UAV autonomy – mission planning to envelope protection
  • Future research and development directions – UAV fault-tolerant control and co-operative control of multiple UAVs
  • 15:10 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 SAR/MTI WITHIN UAVS

    Dr Wim Van Russom

    Dr Wim Van Russom, Scientific Researcher, Radar and Electronic Warfare, TNO Defence, Security and Safety

  • Meeting the surveillance requirements for UAVs
  • Benefits of SAR on small platforms
  • TNO’s miniSAR, a new generation SAR-MTI sensor
  • MALE UAV SAR, high performance MTI and SAR surveillance
  • 16:20 THE CONVERGENCE OF COMMERCIAL AND MILITARY UV MARKETS AND TECHNOLOGIES

    Shai Shammai

    Shai Shammai, Consulting Manager, Aerospace Defence, Frost & Sullivan

  • What are the critical trends in military UVs?
  • Analysis of spending within the military UV arena – where does and will the money go?
  • The introduction of advanced technologies and systems into the market and their impact
  • The problems and challenges of third party provision and contractor logistics support
  • Working with ‘what we got’ and ‘what we need’
  • 17:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

    +

    Workshops

    UAV Mission Planning and Control with Multiple Levels of Autonomy
    Workshop

    UAV Mission Planning and Control with Multiple Levels of Autonomy

    The Hatton, at etc. venues
    30th November 2005
    London, United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    51/53 Hatton Garden
    London EC1N 8HN
    United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    HOTEL BOOKING FORM

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

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