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Recent conflicts have illustrated that ISR is a fundamental aspect of warfare today. The inclusion of UAVs in this area has widened the scope to fight conflicts from the command room, rather than using battletanks and man-to-man operations in the field. With rising technology in the defence sector today, it is more important than ever to understand how best to deploy UAVs and utilise ISTAR actions in the battlefield, and how these actions are affecting international defence strategies.

Persistent Surveillance will address the ongoing advancements in ISTAR, demonstrating the current capability, as well as future developments in getting intelligence to the warfighter. Through lessons learned in recent operations, case studies will show the successes in surveillance, particularly through the application of unmanned vehicles and ISR integration. Future technologies, trends and techniques will also be assessed. Major General Gary Winterberger (Commander, NATO Early Warning and Control Force, NATO’s only operational command) will be delivering a keynote presentation regarding ISR integration within NATO.

This events panel of industry experts will provide you with an unparalleled opportunity to network and to learn key issues that are impacting upon Persistent Surveillance. This conference therefore should not be missed by anyone involved in the industry.

Guest Speakers at Persistent Surveillance include...

  • Major General Gary Winterberger, Commander, NATO Airborne Early Warning and Control Force
  • Colonel Michael Leahy (PhD), Material Group Director, Air Vehicles Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, US Air Force
  • Colonel (Ret’d) Herb Kemp, Vice President, SRA International
  • Wing Commander Andrew Jeffrey, DAS-UAV, Ministry of Defence, UK
  • Major Armand Goossens, Technical Officer, MALE UAV, Royal Netherlands Air Force
  • Major Nikolaos Koutras, G-1, Section Electronic Warfare - Surveillance, Communication Directorate, General Staff, Hellenic Army
  • Major Gianopoulos, G-2, Section Electronic Warfare - Surveillance, Communication Directorate, General Staff, Hellenic Army
  • John Mahaffey, Senior Scientist, NATO C3 Agency
  • Dr David Hull, Technical Capability Leader, ISTAR, DSTL
  • Paul Comeau, Operational Research Lead, Canadian Forces Experimentation Centre, Canadian National Defence Headquarters
  • Dr J Douglas Beason (Col Ret’d) , Director, ISR, Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA
  • Professor Peter Hoogeboom, Senior Advisor, TNO Physics and Electronics Laboratory
  • Professor Ian Poll OBE, Professor of Aerospace Engineering and Technical Director, Cranfield Aerospace
  • Professor George J Vachtsevanos, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology
  • Dr David Jordan, Defence Studies Lecturer, King’s College London

This conference should not be missed by anyone in the industry!

Conference programme

8:30 Registration & Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Professor Ian Poll OBE

Professor Ian Poll OBE, Professor of Aerospace Engineering and Technical Director, Cranfield Aerospace

9:10 ENHANCING ISR CAPABILITIES

Dr David Hull

Dr David Hull, Technical Capability Leader ISTAR, DSTL

  • Ensuring maximum capability in all weathers at all times
  • The new battlefield – challenges ahead in ensuring capability
  • Current developments in ISR technology
  • The potential of technology
  • 9:50 PERSISTENT ISR

    Colonel Michael Leahy (PhD)

    Colonel Michael Leahy (PhD), Material Group Director, Air Vehicles Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, US Air Force

  • Integrating air breathing persistent ISR concepts
  • Capability focused tech investment – a process for delivering integrated tech suites
  • Current programmes within the AFRL
  • Emerging requirements from recent future capability gap analysis
  • The future of persistent ISR and the UAV
  • 10:30 Morning Coffee

    11:00 OPPORTUNITIES AND ADVANCES IN EMPLOYMENT AND EXPLOITATION OF COALITION ISR

    John Mahaffey

    John Mahaffey, Senior Scientist, NATO C3 Agency

  • Coalition ISR systems – an historical perspective
  • Coalition ISR operations – the Commander’s role
  • ISR interoperability and integration
  • Experimentation in the operational environment
  • Operational and technical advances for coalition ISR capabilities
  • 11:40 PANEL DISCUSSION

    Chaired By: Professor Ian Poll OBE , Professor of Aerospace Engineering and Technical Director , Cranfield Aerospace
    Colonel Michael Leahy (PhD)

    Colonel Michael Leahy (PhD), Material Group Director, Air Vehicles Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, US Air Force

    John Mahaffey

    John Mahaffey, Senior Scientist, NATO C3 Agency

    Dr David Hull

    Dr David Hull, Technical Capability Leader ISTAR, DSTL

    12:20 Networking Lunch

    13:50 MANNED AND UNMANNED ISR SYSTEMS

  • NATO staff requirements for 21st century operations
  • Functions of the transatlantic industrial proposed solution
  • Integration of co-operative radar
  • Analysis of the Prague Summit
  • The impact of NATO actions on international programs
  • Major Nichlaos Koutras

    Major Nichlaos Koutras, Program Manager, ISTAR, Signals Directorate, Hellenic Army General Staff/Signal div

    Major Gianopoulos

    Major Gianopoulos, Assistant Programme Manager, ISTAR, Signals Directorate, Hellenic Army General Staff/Signal div

    14:30 ALLIANCE GROUND SURVEILLANCE

    James Moseman

    James Moseman, Director, Europe & NATO, Northrop Grumman

  • AGS Program Progress Report - toward a deployable AGS capability for NATO and the EU
  • Responding to NATO military requirement
  • NATO AGS mixed fleet architecture and assets
  • Supporting the network: interdependence of C2 and ISR
  • Adapting ISR architecture to operational scenario
  • 15:10 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 CANADIAN ISR CAPABILITIES

    Paul Comeau

    Paul Comeau, Operational Research Lead, Canadian Forces Experimentation Centre, Canadian National Defence Headquarters

  • Current and potential ISR capabilities through net enabled operations
  • Results from recent CFEC experimentation (the Pacific and Atlantic Littoral ISR Experiments)
  • Lessons learned and emerging future requirements for ISR stemming from this experimentation
  • The need for continued experimentation and advanced concept development
  • Integration of experimentation results and the UAV Joint Program Office
  • 16:20 IMAGE EXPLOITATION AT THE SENSOR

    Brian Hoerl

    Brian Hoerl, Business Group Manager, Defence Technology Business Segment, Mercury Computer Systems

  • The increasing role of surveillance
  • The increase in sensor types and sensor resolution
  • Why the current exploitation scheme is problematic
  • Migration to platform exploitation
  • The new focus on deploying algorithms
  • 17:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-registration & Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Professor Ian Poll OBE

    Professor Ian Poll OBE, Professor of Aerospace Engineering and Technical Director, Cranfield Aerospace

    9:10 NATO INTEGRATION

    Major General Gary Winterberger

    Major General Gary Winterberger, Commander, NATO Airborne Early Warning and Control Force

  • NATO integration of ISR with AGS and UAVs
  • Using integration of services to enhance the missions of NATO
  • Integration of air to ground assets
  • Increasing information for future roles of missions
  • 9:50 THE INTEGRATION OF TECHNOLOGY WITHIN FUTURE ISR

    Dr J Douglas Beason

    Dr J Douglas Beason, Director ISR, Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA

  • The need for effective research and development
  • Technological advancements and their potential impact upon future capabilities
  • The application with UAVs and other platforms
  • 10:30 Morning Coffee

    11:00 THE FUTURE OF EMBEDDED COMPUTING FOR PERSISTENT SURVEILLANCE

    Joey Sevin

    Joey Sevin, Director of Business Development, Radar Business, Mercury Computer Systems

  • Current state of Embedded computing for surveillance
  • What technology trends are driving deployed systems decisions?
  • Faster, hotter processors
  • Faster interconnect fabrics
  • Software trends for persistent surveillance
  • 11:40 UK PERSPECTIVE OF FUTURE UAV STRATEGY

  • Current and future capability
  • Where does the UAV ‘fit it’, now and in the future?
  • What we must include within strategy integration?
  • The Joint Force – how must we adapt operational strategy, planning and execution to accommodate future coalition requirements?
  • Wing Commander Andrew Jeffrey

    Wing Commander Andrew Jeffrey, DAS-UAV, Ministry of Defence

    Major Andrew Page

    Major Andrew Page, SO2 ISTAR, Directorate of Joint Capability, Ministry of Defence

    12:20 Networking Lunch

    13:50 THE IMPLICATIONS OF FUTURE SURVEILLANCE

    Peter Hoogeboom

    Peter Hoogeboom, Senior Advisor Radar, TNO Physics and Electronics Laboratory (TNO-FEL)

  • The need for effective research and development within radar systems
  • Technological advancements and their potential impact upon future capabilities
  • Radar capabilities/systems of the future – advanced SAR?
  • Future radar technology integration within UAVs and AGS
  • Maximising information extraction
  • 14:30 THE IMPACT OF THE MALE UAV UPON ISR WITHIN THE ROYAL NETHERLANDS AIR FORCE

    Major Armand Goossens

    Major Armand Goossens, Technical Officer, MALE UAV, Royal Netherlands Air Force

  • Bridging the gap - current and future UAVs and ISTAR capability of the RNLAF
  • ISTAR missions of the future and MALE UAVs role within these missions
  • Conceptual development to testing - the project currently and results so far
  • The future of the MALE UAV and UAVs within the RNLAF
  • 15:10 CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES FOR IMPROVED UAV AUTONOMY AND RELIABILITY

    Professor George J Vachtsevanos

    Professor George J Vachtsevanos, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute Of Technology

  • Concept of autonomy
  • UAV hardware and software for autonomous flight operations
  • Control strategies for improved UAV autonomy – mission planning to envelope protection
  • Future research and development directions – UAV fault-tolerant control and co-operative control of multiple UAVs
  • 15:50 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

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