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You will no doubt be aware that urban warfare is one of the biggest issues facing modern armies. To reduce your time researching the latest developments in urban warfare concepts we are producing our third conference to meet all your demands in this field.

SMi's third annual Urban Warfare conference taking place on 3rd & 4th December 2001 in London, will enable you to gain a comprehensive insight into the latest advances and technologies.

Key speakers include:

    Captain Scott Meehan, Project Director JRTC Instrumentation Systems for Transitions Urban MOUT, United States Army

    William Swearengin, Product Co-ordinator, Advanced Systems Technology

    David Fordyce, Combat Systems Analysis Division/Artillery Team, United States Army Material System

    Debra Stanislawski, Global Issues Branch Chief, Marine Corp Intelligence Activity

    Major Alistair Rule, Officer in Command, Urban Operations Wing, British Army

    Lt Col. Christer Levin, Training Support, Swedish Armed Forces

    Major Jim Storr, SO2 Command Development, Directorate of Land Warfare (British Army)

Please take a look through the rest of the programme. I'm sure you'll find a number of presentations that interest you. Places will be limited, but registration is easy. Simply complete the registration form.

Conference programme

9:00 Registration & Coffee

9:30 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Colonel Mike Crawshaw OBE

Colonel Mike Crawshaw OBE, Editor, British Army Review

9:40 THEN AND NOW-REPEATING THE SAME MISTAKES?

Colonel Mike Crawshaw OBE

Colonel Mike Crawshaw OBE, Editor, British Army Review

  • If in doubt, don’t: urban warfare as a practice of last resort
  • WW2 - development of TTPs from Warsaw to Bremen
  • Blind alleys and high payoffs
  • Civil population factors - Singapore, Caen, Manila
  • Recent experience Hue 1968, Grozny
  • Restoring the all-arms balance
  • 10:20 USING UAVS TO SUPPORT MILITARY OPERATION IN URBAN TERRAIN

    Paul Evans

    Paul Evans, Project Manager, Tactical UAVs & Principal Engineer, QinetiQ

  • Types of UAVs
  • Missions that could be performed by UAVs
  • Key factors affecting their use
  • Comparison with ground based sensors
  • Future development
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 SWEDISH VIEW OF FIGHTING IN URBAN TERRAIN

    Lieutenant Colonel Christer Levin

    Lieutenant Colonel Christer Levin, G7/ Head of Training Support, Swedish Armed Forces

  • Use of mechanised units in urban terrain
  • Need of supporting system and technologies
  • Need of training facilities
  • Need of system for follow up and evaluation
  • 12:00 UNITES STATES MARINE CORPS AND THE URBAN CONFLICT

    Debra Stanislawski

    Debra Stanislawski, Global Issues Branch Chief, Marine Corps Intelligence Activity

  • Defining the Urban environment
  • Urban intelligence challenges
  • Future concepts and issues
  • 12:40 Lunch

    14:00 ALTERNATIVE CONCEPTS FOR URBAN OPERATIONS

    Major Jim Storr

    Major Jim Storr, SO2 Command Development, Directorate of Land Warfare (British Army)

  • Available evidence
  • Operation research
  • Enduring characteristics
  • Implications for development
  • Trials and experimentation development
  • 14:40 THE IMPACT OF URBAN INFRASTRUCTURE DISRUPTIONS ON MILITARY OPERATIONS AND NON-COMBATANTS

    Christina M. Patterson

    Christina M. Patterson, Research Staff Member, Institute for Defense Analyses

  • Why is infrastructure important?
  • Case study examples
  • Modeling infrastructure and its impacts
  • Updates per current events (as necessary)
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 EVALUATING URBAN FIGHTING TECHNOLOGIES

    Gerben D. Klein Baltink

    Gerben D. Klein Baltink, Division Manager, TNO- PRINS MAURITS LABORATORY

  • The urban area creates capability gaps
  • What may technology contribute
  • Can new military systems deal with the urban terrain
  • Conclusions, based on intermediate of a NATO urban operations study
  • 16:20 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    9:00 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:30 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Colonel Mike Crawshaw OBE

    Colonel Mike Crawshaw OBE, Editor, British Army Review

    9:40 TRAINING FOR URBAN WARFARE

    Major Alistair Rule

    Major Alistair Rule, Officer in Command, Urban Operations Wing, British Army

  • Improving the operational effectiveness of soldiers
  • Determining the military utility of advanced technologies
  • Testing new operational concepts to achieve dominance in urban warfare
  • Setting the stage for rapid acquisition of the successful advanced concept technology
  • Lessons learnt from the most recent experiences
  • 10:20 CAMTF Urban Operations Training Strategy Update

    Jeffrey Arneson

    Jeffrey Arneson, Combined Arms MOUT Task Force, Training Team Chief, Los Alamos Technical Associates

  • Overarching DTLOMS based assessment.
  • Includes Live, Virtual, and Constructive simulation domains.
  • Strategy focuses on live home station urban training facilities.
  • Urban doctrine and training publication updates.
  • Facilities support and sustainment cost estimates.
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 SIMULATION TRAINING SYSTEMS

    Jorge Rivera

    Jorge Rivera, Project Director Training Ranges, Project Director

  • Initial US approach - Joint Readiness Training Centre Instrumentation System
  • MOUT Instrumentation & Training Device Working Group
  • MOUT common architecture
  • MOUT / restrictive terrain ID / IQ contract vehicle
  • 12:00 SOLDIER MODERNISATION AND URBAN WARFARE

    Murray Fullerton

    Murray Fullerton, Programme Manager Soldier Modernisation, BAE SYSTEMS

  • Background to Soldier Modernisation programmes world-wide
  • Challenges of deployments in urban environments
  • Upside and downsides of technological solutions
  • How will future urban conflicts benefits from soldier modernisation
  • 12:40 Lunch

    14:00 DEFENSIVE AIDS SUITE (DAS)

    John Bench

    John Bench, Company Projects Executive, FHL Division/Claverham

  • The defensive equation
  • Limitations of current DAS
  • Key features of a DAS
  • Options and way ahead
  • 14:40 TO SEE OR NOT TO SEE

    Steve Rickard

    Steve Rickard, Business Development Manager - Infantry Business Group, Thales Optics

  • The soldier on the ground
  • Direct and indirect vision systems - seeing without being seen
  • Vision technologies overview
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 ARTILLERY EFFECTS IN A MOUT ENVIRONMENT

    David Fordyce

    David Fordyce, Combat Systems Analysis Division/ Artillery Team, United States Army Material System

  • Emphasis on quick, lethal operations in urban terrain
  • Classification of an urban terrain development and implementation of urban terrain templates
  • Utilising the Support Warfare Analysis Mean Area of Effects (SWAMAE) model, selected results and conclusions
  • Use of other models
  • 16:20 Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

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