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SMi’s inaugural conference on Critical Incident Recovery is the sister conference to SMi’s hugely successful conference on Homeland Security. Critical Incident Recovery will cover the post-incident activity from terrorist or strategic attack. The conference will address current thought on the planning for, and responses to terrorist attacks, what lessons have been learned from previous attacks and how have these lessons been implemented in planning for any future incidents. The Conference includes speakers from government organisations, health authorities, law enforcement agencies, financial and commercial institutions. It is a fantastic opportunity to learn how to respond effectively and efficiently to a terrorist attack

A unique opportunity to learn from leading industry experts including:
· David Donegan, Deputy Director, London Resilience
· Valerie Shawcross, Chair, London Fire and Emergency planning Authority
· Dr Lois M Davis, Policy analyst, RAND Corporation
· Dr Brian Jackson, Associate physical scientist, RAND Corporation
· Detective Chief Inspector Brian Howat, Head of Unit, National Counter Terrorism Security Office
· Mark Oram, Head of Response, National Infrastructure Security Co-ordination Centre
· Dr John Simpson, Interim Deputy Director, Emergency Response Division, Health Protection Agency
· Greg Ferris, Executive Director Global Business Continuity Planning, Morgan Stanley
· Michael Harrison, Chairman, Protecting the Critical Information Infrastructure Initiative (PCII) & Chairman, Harrison Smith Associates

Benefits of attending:
· Hear the latest research into national and international responses to terrorism
· Gain an insight into emergency services’ responses to terrorism
· Assess health service planning and responses to terrorist attack
· Identify the latest trends in emergency management
· Understand the importance of critical infrastructure protection
· Develop the best practices for business continuity and recovery

Conference programme

8:30 Registration and Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Tony Moore

Tony Moore, Senior Consultant / Chairman, Cranfield Disaster Management Centre / Institute of Civil Defence and Disaster Studies (ICCDDS)

9:10 UK PLANNING FOR RESPONSES TO TERRORISM

Tamara Makerenko

Tamara Makerenko, Research Fellow, Centre for the Study of Terrorism and Political Violence, University of St Andrews

  • Government preparation for terrorist attacks
  • How prepared are the emergency services for unconventional attacks?
  • Are the mechanisms in place for a successful response to terrorism?
  • What wider lessons can be learned from the UK response to terrorism?
  • What else can be done to protect against attacks?
  • The terrorist threat in the future
  • 9:40 INTERNATIONAL TERRORIST RESPONSE

    James T Kirkhope

    James T Kirkhope, President, Terrorism Studies Group & Research Director, Terrorism Research Center

  • International co-operation, responding to terrorist incidents in developing countries
  • Preparations and responses to terrorist attacks within developing countries (case study)
  • American terrorism incident response preparations and the genesis of the Department of Homeland Security
  • The future of critical incident response for developed and developing countries
  • 10:20 LONDON’S RESPONSE TO CATASTROPHIC INCIDENTS

    David Donegan

    David Donegan, Deputy Director, London Resilience

  • The role of the London Resilience Team
  • Involving all stakeholders in planning for catastrophic incidents
  • Strategies for response and recovery
  • How do we provide a co-ordinated united response?
  • Lessons learned from previous terrorist attacks, incidents and exercises
  • What is there still to be done to provide a co-ordinated response?
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 THE BRITISH EXPERIENCE OF TERRORISM

    Detective Chief Inspector Brian Howat

    Detective Chief Inspector Brian Howat, Head of Unit, National Counter Terrorism Security Office

  • The British experience of terrorism
  • Lessons learned from terrorist attacks in the past
  • Implementing the lessons learned into future response plans
  • Differences between terrorist attacks in the past and possible attacks in the future
  • Suggestions for the planning of terrorist response
  • 12:00 EMERGENCY RESPONSES TO TERRORISM

    Valerie Shawcross CBE

    Valerie Shawcross CBE, Chair, London Fire and Emergency Planning Authority

  • Planning for a terrorist attack
  • Lessons learned from previous attacks
  • Liaison with other organisations
  • Ability to respond to weapons of mass destruction
  • Responses in the future
  • 12:40 Networking Lunch

    14:00 PROTECTING EMERGENCY RESPONDERS

    Dr Brian Jackson

    Dr Brian Jackson, Associate Physical Scientist, RAND Corporation

  • Responder safety management
  • Performance and availability of personal protective equipment
  • Information and training
  • Site management and personal protection
  • Recommendations for moving forward
  • Concluding remarks
  • 14:40 HEALTH SEVICES RESPONSES

    Dr John Simpson

    Dr John Simpson, Interim Deputy Director, Emergency Response Division, Health Protection Agency

  • Planning for a terrorist attack
  • Preparing the NHS for responding to terrorist attack
  • Co-ordinating the response with other agencies
  • Lessons learned from previous attacks
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 LOCAL HEALTH RESPONDERS

    Dr Lois M Davis

    Dr Lois M Davis, Policy Analyst, RAND Corporation

  • Introduction
  • WMD scenarios
  • What type of planning has been done by health responders for biological and chemical terrorism?
  • How well integrated are health responders for biological and chemical terrorism?
  • Meeting the challenge of improving planning and preparedness for biological and chemical terrorism at the local level
  • 16:20 PLANNING RESPONSES TO BIO-TERRORIST ATTACK

    Dr Stephen Leach

    Dr Stephen Leach, Scientific Leader, Centre for Applied Microbiology and Research, Porton Down, Health Protection Agency

  • Microbial strategic response capability, HPA Porton Down’s role
  • Microbial Risk Assessment (MRA)
  • HPA Porton Down MRA capability
  • Risk modelling techniques
  • Modelling public health intervention
  • Smallpox / plague etc. Responses
    Benefits to date
  • 17:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Tony Moore

    Tony Moore, Senior Consultant / Chairman, Cranfield Disaster Management Centre / Institute of Civil Defence and Disaster Studies (ICCDDS)

    9:10 THE FUTURE OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT

  • Historical context of the US emergency management system
  • The concepts of the US emergency management system
  • Implications of incorporating new and emerging threats into US emergency management system
  • Impacts of the Department of Homeland Security on federal, state and local emergency management
  • Trends in emergency management, national vs local, natural vs man made
  • The future partners in emergency management
    Keys to the survival for the US emergency management system
  • George Haddow

    George Haddow, Principal & Adjunct Professor, Institute of Crisis, Disaster and Risk Management, Bullock and Haddow & George Washington University

    Jane Bullock

    Jane Bullock, Princial & Adjunct Professor, Institute of Crisis, Institute of Crisis, Disaster and Risk Management, Bullock and Haddow & George Washington University

    9:40 RESPONDING AND RECOVERING FROM TERRORISM THROUGH EFFECTIVE EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT

    David Templeman

    David Templeman, Director General, Emergency Management Australia

  • Minimising the possibility of a national disaster through co-operation and co-ordination between key government agencies
  • Refining emergency procedures arrangements and capabilities
  • Facilitating a national approach to emergency management in Australia
  • Recent achievements, challenges and future initiatives
  • 10:20 CREATING AN EMERGENCY RESPONSE AGENCY

    Jenny Lundgren

    Jenny Lundgren, Principal Administrative Officer , Swedish Emergency Management Agency

  • Why create a new agency? The concept of total defence
  • The challenges of developing a new agency
  • Learning to respond and acquire experience
  • The model for the agency, national or international?
  • Co-operating with other organisations
  • Progress after a year
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION

    Michael Harrison

    Michael Harrison, Chairman, Protecting the Critical Information Infrastructure Initiative (PCII) & Harrison Smith Associates

  • Threats to critical infrastructure
  • Strategies to protect critical infrastructure
  • Lessons learned from previous attacks
  • The danger of assumption, how secure is your crisis recovery plan?
  • 12:00 ELECTRONIC ATTACK

    Mark Oram

    Mark Oram, Head of Response, National Infrastructure Security Co-ordination Centre

  • The NICC’s role in response to attack
  • Co-ordinating the response
  • Planning for recovery
  • Lessons learned from previous attacks
  • Future plans for response and recovery
  • 12:40 Networking Lunch

    14:00 COMMUNICATIONS

    David Groom FBCI

    David Groom FBCI, Emergency Planning and Restoration Policy and Process Manager,, British Telecom

  • Disaster scenarios for Telecommunications
  • Impacts on customers
  • Strategies for dealing with impacts
  • BT’s disaster recovery equipment and networks
  • Customer’s demands and priorities
  • Customer pre-planning and resilience
  • 14:40 GLOBAL CONTINGENCY PLANNING

    Steve Smith

    Steve Smith, Director of Business Continuity Management EMEA, Merrill Lynch

  • BCP in context
  • Critical success factors
  • Methodology
  • BCP policy and standards
    Prioritising the firm
  • Vendors and clients
    Testing the plan
  • Costs
    Operational risk and BCP
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 DISASTER RECOVERY AND RESPONSE

    Greg Feris

    Greg Feris, Global Director of Business Continuity Planning, Morgan Stanley

  • September 11th and Morgan Stanley
  • Lessons learned from the attacks
  • Protecting Morgan Stanley’s Critical Infrastructure
  • New Threats
  • Planning for the future
  • 16:20 CONTINUITY STRATEGIES

    Michael Miora

    Michael Miora, President and CEO, Contingenz Corporation

  • Establishing a strategy: continuation or recovery?
  • A survey of strategies
  • Reserve system strategy
  • Summary of strategies
  • 17:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks
    Close of Conference

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    Workshops

    Practical Business Continuity Plan Development
    Workshop

    Practical Business Continuity Plan Development

    The Hatton, at etc. venues
    17th September 2003
    London, United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    51/53 Hatton Garden
    London EC1N 8HN
    United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    HOTEL BOOKING FORM

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

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