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The increasing urbanisation of many of the world's trouble spots poses unique challenges to 21st century warfighters. Urban terrain is perhaps the most likely battlefield of the 21st century and, as critical battles will be won and lost there, the military must address training, preparedness, and modernisation issues as they relate to MOUT (military operations on urban terrain). Tactics, procedures, techniques, and technologies need to be developed and evaluated for implementation on the urban landscape and lessons learned in such places as Somalia (Mogadishu), Bosnia (Sarajevo), Chechen Republic (Grozny) and Israel need to be studied and applied in present-day and future conflict situations in built-up areas.

Military involvement in urban conflict and peacekeeping missions has escalated significantly over the past several years. It is estimated that by the year 2025, 70% of the world’s population will reside in urban areas.

Attend SMi’s 3rd Annual Urban Warfare Conferences at the Hatton in London, to examine topics including

The roles and challenges of military operations in urban areas

Inherent challenges of Joint Urban Operations (JUO)

The operational context of Joint Urban Operations

Types of urban operations in war Examining the physical and cultural environment to anticipate and prepare responses to a range of contingency situations (Isolating, retaining, containing, denying, reducing)

The urban area in Military Operations Other Than War (MOOTW)

Deterring war and promoting peace (Arms control, combating terrorism, peace operations, show of force etc.)

Planning considerations in Joint Urban Operations

Characteristics of an urban area

Multinational coalitions and urban operations

Operating as a joint team

Urban Operations; combat versus MOOTW – what's the difference and how can we do it better?

With representatives attending from the major players in this industry, this conference will meet all your networking requirements. And what’s more, you can gain all these contacts in just 2 days! And with our lunches promoting open debate, you will have the perfect opportunity to build these relationships and exchange industry specific knowledge.

Speakers from Urban Warfare II 2001 included;

Colonel Mike Crawshaw OBE, Editor, British Army Review

Major Jim Storr, SO2 Command Development, Directorate of Land Warfare (British Army)

Paul Evans, Project Manager, Tactical UAVs & Principal Engineer, QinetiQ

Lieutenant Colonel Christer Levin, G7/ Head of Training Support, Swedish Armed Forces

Murray Fullerton, Programme Manager Soldier Modernisation, BAE SYSTEMS

Dr John Pike, Sales Director SIMLAS, Oerlikon Contraves AG

John Bench, Company Projects Executive, FHL Division/Claverham

Major Alistair Rule, Officer in Command, Urban Operations Wing, British Army

Jeffrey Arneson, Combined Arms MOUT Task Force, Training Team Chief, Los Alamos Technical Associates

Jorge Rivera, Project Director Training Ranges, U.S Army Simulation, Training, and Instrumentation Command (STRICOM)

Colonel Robert Reyenga, Project Director Training Devices, Stricom/PM Trade

Christina M. Patterson, Research Associate, Institute for Defense Analyses

Gerben D. Klein Baltink, Division Manager, TNO- PRINS MAURITS LABORATORY

Steve Rickard, Sales Manager, Thales Optics

David Fordyce, Combat Systems Analysis Division/ Artillery Team, United States Army Material System

Topics covered in Urban Warfare 2001 include

THEN AND NOW–REPEATING THE SAME MISTAKES?

A historically based review of urban warfare tactics, techniques and procedures

ALTERNATIVE CONCEPTS FOR URBAN OPERATIONS

An overview

USING UAVS TO SUPPORT MILITARY OPERATION IN URBAN TERRAIN

An Overview

SWEDISH VIEW OF FIGHTING IN URBAN TERRAIN

Development of tactics and training

SOLDIER MODERNISATION AND URBAN WARFARE

An Overview

SOLDIER TRACKING AND PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT SYSTEM

DEFENSIVE AIDS SUITE (DAS)

An overview

TRAINING FOR URBAN WARFARE

Fighting in built up areas - Close Combat or Stand-Off

CAMTF URBAN OPERATIONS TRAINING STRATEGY UPDATE

An overview

SIMULATION TRAINING SYSTEMS

Combined operations in the urban terrain – a training imperative

THE IMPACT OF URBAN INFRASTRUCTURE DISRUPTIONS ON MILITARY OPERATIONS AND NON-COMBATANTS

An overview

EVALUATING URBAN FIGHTING TECHNOLOGIES

An Overview

TO SEE OR NOT TO SEE

Vision technology within the urban warfare environment

ARTILLERY EFFECTS IN A MOUT ENVIRONMENT

Deriving characteristics in a MOUT environment (lethal areas)

Conference programme

8:30 Registration and Coffee

9:00 Chairperson's Opening Remarks

Dr Alice Hills

Dr Alice Hills, Senior Lecturer JSCSC,

9:10 KEYNOTE ADDRESS

Colonel Edward J Lesnowicz Jr

Colonel Edward J Lesnowicz Jr, Chief of Staff, HQ US Marine Forces Europe

  • Urban aggression or intervention?
  • An overview of current doctrine
  • Asymmetrical warfare and appropriate use of force
  • Enduring characteristics
  • Operational engagement issues
  • 9:40 THE US MARINE PERSPECTIVE ON URBAN OPERATIONS

    Colonel James Lasswell (Ret’d)

    Colonel James Lasswell (Ret’d), Director, Experimentation Plans Division, USMC Warfighting Laboratory

  • USMC urban warfare experimentation
  • Follow-on experimentation
  • Technological development
  • Lessons learned
  • 10:20 FIBUA: A SPECTRUM OF OPERATIONS

    Major Alistair Rule

    Major Alistair Rule, Officer Commanding, Urban Operations Wing, British Army

  • Preparation for warfighting
  • Fluidity and flexibility of operations
  • Training aspects
  • Tactical Adaptability
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 MICRO AIR VEHICLES

    Dr Rafal Zbikowski

    Dr Rafal Zbikowski, Principal Research Officer, Department of Aerospace, Power and Sensors, RMCS Cranfield

  • The role of MAVs in the urban arena
  • The advantages of portable technology
  • Stealth and survival
  • Surveillance – battle zone and hostages
  • PGMs
  • Challenges and solutions
  • 12:00 THE ISRAELI PERSPECTIVE

    Colonel Moshe Kravitz

    Colonel Moshe Kravitz, Head of Doctrine, Israeli Defence Forces

  • Essential factors of operations on the urban battlefield
  • The perception of the threat
  • The development of doctrine
  • The use of force and the constraints on the use of force
  • Lessons learned
  • The future battlefield
  • 12:40 Lunch

    14:00 THE CRITICAL NATURE OF INTELLIGENCE

    Dr Kevin O’Brien

    Dr Kevin O’Brien, Senior Policy Analyst, RAND Europe

  • Defining the urban environment
  • Urban intelligence challenges
  • The low-tech enemy in a high-tech environment
  • HUMINT – the essential nature of local knowledge
  • The application of SIGINT
  • The utility of misinformation
  • 14:40 CBRN ISSUES

    Colonel David Lewthwaite

    Colonel David Lewthwaite, Assistant Director NBC, British Army

  • Asymmetric warfare, actors, methods and intent
  • The new CBRN scene
  • Using CBRN for asymmetric impact
  • Challenges and solutions
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 PROTECTIVE DESIGN APPROACH FOR BUILDINGS

    Chris Bowes

    Chris Bowes, Defence Sector Director, TPS Consult

  • The construction of buildings to save lives in the event of a terrorist attack
  • Defining the threat
  • Limited localised damage
  • Design and structural elements
  • Design of glazing
  • Design against explosion
  • 16:20 SOLDIER MODERNISATION AND C4ISR

    Brian Johnson

    Brian Johnson, Business Development Manager, BAE SYSTEMS

  • Communications in the urban environment
  • Friendly identification
  • Sniper location
  • Fire support
  • Location reporting systems
  • Battlespace challenges
  • 17:00 Chairperson's Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairperson's Opening Remarks

    Dr Alice Hills

    Dr Alice Hills, Senior Lecturer, JSCSC

    9:10 THE DEVELOPMENT OF MOUT STRATEGY

    Arthur van Allen

    Arthur van Allen, Training Leader, Combined Arms MOUT Task Force

  • Strategic development from Brigade level down
  • The synthetic world of joint operations and coalitions
  • Construction of facilities
  • Encompassing MOUT
  • 9:40 THE STRATEGIC LOGIC OF URBAN OPERATIONS

    Dr Alice Hills

    Dr Alice Hills, Senior Lecturer, JSCSC

  • The contradiction of liberal values in war
  • The military as a policing force
  • Aspects of control in urban warfare
  • Urban operations in focus
  • 10:20 CASE STUDY

    Lieutenant Colonel Colin Beadon MBE

    Lieutenant Colonel Colin Beadon MBE, Royal Marines Exchange Officer to USMC, Quantico, Royal Marines

  • Northern Ireland: the urban context
  • The urban terrorist and his TTPs
  • Constraints and challenges
  • Importance of doctrine and training
  • Lessons learned and applications today
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 CASE HISTORY

    12:00 AIRPOWER APPLIED

    Lieutenant Colonel Julian M P McDonnell, AAC

    Lieutenant Colonel Julian M P McDonnell, AAC, SO1 Concepts and Doctrine, Headquarters Director Army Aviation

  • The flexibility of airpower
  • The utility of helicopters in rescue situations
  • Fire support for ground troops
  • Troop movement in built-up areas
  • Targeting and manoeuvre
  • The advantages of airpower
  • 12:40 Lunch

    14:00 VISION TECHNOLOGY

    Ravi Rohatgi

    Ravi Rohatgi, Business Development Manager, Thales Optronics

  • Assessment of barriers to vision within an urban environment
  • Image intensification techniques
  • Thermal imager techniques
  • Other relevant sensors
  • Remote observation and engagement
  • Use of active E/O techniques

    Integrating enhanced vision technologies into a future Soldier System

  • 14:40 THE TECHNOLOGICAL ASPECTS

    Gary I Washam

    Gary I Washam, Director, Southeast Region, Cubic Defense Applications

  • Soldier instrumentation
  • Direct fire and area weapons effects simulation
  • PC Based Range Instrumentation Systems (PC-RIS)
  • Eye-safe laser transmitters
  • Detector systems
  • Recording and analysis
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 URBAN WARFARE TRAINING

  • Force-on-force training
  • Direct fire tactical engagement simulation
  • Infrared training
  • Performance review
  • GPS technology
  • Manworn systems
  • Roger Weber

    Roger Weber, Project Director MILES 2000, STRICOM

    Lieutenant Colonel Ken Wheeler

    Lieutenant Colonel Ken Wheeler, Product Manager, PM Trade

    16:20 COMMAND AND CONTROL

    Frederick L Rost II

    Frederick L Rost II, Executive Vice President and General Manager, Command System Inc

  • Command is command
  • Leveraging the Ministry of Defence investment
  • Securing the homeland through digitisation
  • Information: the unifying construct
  • The way ahead
  • 17:00 Chairperson's Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

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    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    51/53 Hatton Garden
    London EC1N 8HN
    United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    HOTEL BOOKING FORM

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

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