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Advanced Avionics will explore the hallmarks of next-generation avionics. It will address the future of systems architecture and, by examining the rapidly evolving issue of certification and qualification, it will show how it is being applied in the current market. This move towards advanced avionics architectures has been a direct effect of the increasing cost of procuring and supporting avionics systems, with the result being a distinct move towards more open systems. Evidently, changes in mission readiness and requirements have driven the trend towards interoperability and integration. Therefore, this conference will show how these capabilities are being applied on the battlefield, giving country specific and tri-service perspectives and requirements for avionics systems. The latest procurement initiatives in avionics will also be addressed, looking at the modernisation of design and the use of commercial off the shelf hardware and software and lifecycle affordability.

Programme highlights:
· IDENTIFY the key advancements in modular avionics systems
· DISCOVER how to meet the challenge of standardisation and certification
· MAXIMISE mission effectiveness through lessons learned
· ASSESS the current capability as well as looking to future avionics development
· NETWORK with key decision-makers and industry experts in a globally attended forum

A unique opportunity to learn from military, government & research experts including:
· Lieutenant Colonel Glen Logan, Deputy, Air Integration, Open Systems Joint Task Force/OUSD (AT&L)
· Lieutenant Commander David Fitzjohn, Assistant Director, Acquisition Support, Avionic Systems, Defence Logistics Organisation
· Dennis Brooks, Project Director, Army Target Control Systems, TMO, PEO STRI, US Army
· Dick Pribyl, Division Chief, Avionics, CECOM LRC
· Brian Hicks, Chief, Avionics ASC/AAAA, United States Air Force Aeronautical Enterprise Office
· William Urschel, Chief Architect, USAF Aeronautical Systems Center, US Air Force
· Luke Campbell, E-2C Assistant Program Manager - Program Support Activity (APM-PSA), Naval Air Systems Command
· Samuel Calloway, F-15 System Program Office, Avionics Hardware Engineering, WR-ALC/LFEA, US Air Force
· Mark Beranek, F/A-18 E/F Fiber-Optics IPT Lead, Naval Air Systems Command
· Drew Glista, Photonics Technology Manager, Naval Air Systems Command
· Robert Smith, Systems Engineer–MOSA, US Navy
· Geoffrey Clarkson, Technical Leader Airborne Systems, ASIG, QinetiQ
· Dr Darrel Hopper, Principal Engineer, Air Force Research Laboratory
· Graham Jolliffe, Technical Assurance Manager - Safety and Software, QinetiQ

Conference programme

8:30 Registration and Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Charles Hurst

Charles Hurst, Director, Dayton Operations, Information Spectrum

9:10 EXPLOITING EMERGING STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGIES

Lieutenant Commander David Fitzjohn

Lieutenant Commander David Fitzjohn, Assistant Director, Acquisition Support, Avionic Systems, Defence Logistics Organisation

  • The development of future military avionics systems
  • Expended research
  • Development of commercial models for advanced avionic systems
  • Requirements for real-time safety and security certification
  • Rapid development of affordable advanced avionics
  • Achieving the integrated modular avionics system
  • 9:40 THE MODULAR OPEN SYSTEMS APPROACH (MOSA)

  • Worldwide electronics market place status
  • Military avionics trends
  • Open systems and joint integrated architectures – meeting warfighter needs
  • Avionics planning and execution (AVPLEX)
  • Logistical support considerations
  • Current MOSA activities
  • Charles Hurst

    Charles Hurst, Director, Dayton Operations, Information Spectrum

    Lieutenant Colonel Glen Logan

    Lieutenant Colonel Glen Logan, Deputy, Air Integration, Open Systems Joint Task Force/OUSD (AT&L)

    10:20 VERIFICATION OF SAFETY CRITICAL SOFTWARE

    Nick Tudor

    Nick Tudor, Business Development, Systems Assurance Group, QinetiQ

  • Formal methods
  • Design methodologies
  • Static code analysis
  • Safety case
  • Applicability of standards
  • A case study
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 THE ASAAC STANDARDS

    Ben Giddings

    Ben Giddings, Project Manager, BAE SYSTEMS

  • What is the problem?
  • Concepts of Integrated Modular Avionics
  • Designing an integrated system
  • Why standardise?
  • Costs and benefits
  • The obsolescence problem
  • 12:00 MODERN AVIONICS

    Graham Jolliffe

    Graham Jolliffe, Technical Assurance Manager - Safety and Software, QinetiQ

  • Role of test and evaluation services
  • UK MoD approach to airworthiness
  • Certification – the challenge
  • Traditional approach
  • Current methodology
  • Certification of future avionics
  • 12:40 Lunch

    14:00 WDM OPTICAL LOCAL AREA NETWORK TECHNOLOGY

    Drew Glista

    Drew Glista, Photonics Technology Manager, Naval Air Systems Command

  • DoD LAN roadmap
  • WDM aerospace LAN advantages
  • Ongoing WDM LAN standardisation activities
  • Single mode aerospace cable plant components
  • Highly integrated WDM photonic circuits
  • Avionics LAN future vision
  • 14:40 MODULAR AVIONICS FOR HELICOPTERS AND FIXED WING PLATFORMS

    Hans Brandtberg

    Hans Brandtberg, Director, Strategy and Technology Management, Display and Reconnaissance Systems Division, SaabTech

  • Requirements for mission avionics integration and upgrades
  • Operational cost and life cycle cost
  • Modular architectures
  • Upgrade aspects
  • Avionics equipment (mission computers, utility management, display and video processing, digital maps, digital recorders, etc)
  • Case studies: fighter and helicopter
    Future development
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 INTEGRATED AVIONICS CHANGE

    Brian Hicks

    Brian Hicks, Chief, Avionics ASC/AAAA, United States Air Force Aeronautical Enterprise Office

  • Forces causing change
  • Important capabilities influencing avionics
  • Distributed functionality
  • Network centric operations
  • Managing change through roadmaps
  • Integrating roadmaps
  • 16:20 AVIONICS INTEGRATED ROADMAP STRATEGY

    LH Riggs Jr

    LH Riggs Jr, Senior Systems Engineer, ASC/AAAA, ISI Support Contractor, Information Spectrum

  • Managing change in avionics
  • Roadmaps: what, who and how avionics roadmaps are created
  • Causes of changes
  • Organizational and technology impacts on roadmaps
  • Establishing a baseline for the fielded systems
  • Creating a roadmap of the future for both avionics product groups and platforms
  • 17:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Charles Hurst

    Charles Hurst, Director, Dayton Operations, Information Spectrum

    9:10 INTEGRATED AVIONICS PROGRAM

    Dennis Brooks

    Dennis Brooks, Project Director, Army Target Control Systems, TMO, PEO STRI, US Army

  • US Army’s Targets Management Office overview
  • Common Digital Architecture (CDA) using CANbus
  • CDA-based Integrated Avionics Program
  • Common avionics package
  • IAP benefits
  • IAP – the next step
  • 9:40 AVIONICS INTEGRATION

    Reuven Zalman

    Reuven Zalman, Head of Avionic Systems Engineering, Radom Aviation Systems

  • Improving mission effectiveness
  • Flexibility
  • Integration tools and techniques
  • Local and wide avionics interoperability concept
  • Implementation tradeoffs
  • Future vision overview
  • 10:20 THE COTS SOLUTION

    Lloyd Condra

    Lloyd Condra, Technical Fellow, Boeing Phantom Works

  • Fulfilling the promise of acquisition reform
  • The dynamic nature of COTS semiconductor device technology
  • The challenges of using current and future COTS parts in aerospace
  • The Electronic Component Management Program for aerospace
  • The Aerospace Qualified Electronic Component
  • Co-operation with COTS semiconductor device manufacturers
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

    Geoffrey Clarkson

    Geoffrey Clarkson, Technical Leader Airborne Systems, ASIG, QinetiQ

  • Selection of appropriate avionics for research
  • Overcoming technology limitations
  • Harnessing new developments
  • Exploitation of research and development
  • Examples of avionic technology application – TIARA, Enhanced Vision Systems
  • Technology risk reduction and transition to production solutions
  • 12:00 HUMAN FACTORS

    Dr Darrel Hopper

    Dr Darrel Hopper, Principal Engineer, Air Force Research Laboratory

  • Guiding principles
  • Regulatory activities
  • Design issues
  • Policy development
  • Key challenges
  • Future enhancements
  • 12:40 Networking Lunch

    14:00 AVIONICS VIABILITY

    William Urschel

    William Urschel, Chief Architect, USAF Aeronautical Systems Center, US Air Force

  • Network enabled warfare and impacts on avionics
  • Commercial air traffic management trends and impacts on avionics
  • Commercial processing trends and impacts on avionics
  • The roles of capability roadmapping, systems architecting and systems roadmapping in avionics
  • Procurement and sustainment issues for avionics viability
  • Future development
  • 14:40 PROVIDING REDUCED SOFTWARE COSTS

    Luke Campbell

    Luke Campbell, E-2C Assistant Program Manager - Program Support Activity (APM-PSA), Naval Air Systems Command

  • Drivers for avionics upgrade…software costs, requirements, COTS
  • Move to open systems…open architecture (OA)
  • Rapid pace of technology change
  • Reduced life cycle costs…use of CMM, COTS, OA
  • Implementation of architecture…US Navy E-2C
  • 15:20 F-15 - AVCOM

    Samuel Calloway

    Samuel Calloway, F-15 System Program Office, Avionics Hardware Engineering, WR-ALC/LFEA, US Air Force

  • The environment
  • F-15 DMSMS philosophy
  • Enabling activities
  • Automated analysis tools: - reliability - maintainability - cost - prioritization
  • Summary
  • 16:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks followed by Afternoon Tea

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    Workshops

    Avionics Systems Engineering and the Global Information Grid
    Workshop

    Avionics Systems Engineering and the Global Information Grid

    The Hatton, at etc. venues
    13th February 2004
    London, United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    51/53 Hatton Garden
    London EC1N 8HN
    United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

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