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Information is now a valuable commodity within the defence industry. Changes in the operations of the world’s defence forces have led to the requirement for enhanced information exploitation and information management and for the capacity for platforms to deliver increased warfighting capability.

Increasing platform effectiveness, mission availability and intended life cycle while reducing in-theatre logistical demands and overall Whole Life Cost (WLC) are now priority objectives of each defence force. The integration of Health and Usage Monitoring Systems (HUMS), engine management systems and Prognostic Health Management systems onto these platforms is a key enabler of meeting these objectives and delivering the necessary warfighting capability at reduced cost.

SMi’s The Future of HUMS within Defence Maintenance - Enhancing Platform Capability and Availability Conference will explain how HUMS, CBM and PHM based policies and technologies will impact future military engineering, maintenance and logisitical support. The determination of platform specific health and usage monitoring solutions result from each platform’s specific information needs. Looking at operational and logistical chains to determine how these information needs are driving the HUMS requirement, this conference will identify the different information needs and parameters necessary for maintaining and supporting service specific and tri-service platforms.

There is definite need to discuss the issue of HUMS, CBM and PHM on a more global gathering of defence force/governmental bodies and industrial partners. Equally there is the need to discuss other alternatives outwit HUMS, CBM and PHM that can fill the capability gap that HUMS is believed to. Getting together coalition partners and commercial counterparts to discuss the need for prognostics, health management and advanced maintenance management systems in future platforms (and the options outwit these) to fill the capability gap is something which has become increasingly important and this conference will enable that discussion.

Examining data collection, analysis and management this conference will help you understand the key issues surrounding HUMS, CBM and PHM: identifying the necessary functional and operational requirements, implementing and integrating HUMS into national information infrastructures, interoperability, diagnostics, prognostics, the use of COTS, certification, standardisation, the human element, the risks involved with HUMS and the emerging technologies available.

Detailed international perspectives will illustrate how defence organisations are implementing and integrating HUMS, CBM and PHM to meet their future requirements. Looking at lessons learned from these programmes, The Future of HUMS within Defence Maintenance aims to offer solutions on how your organisation can work with the defence industry to provide maximum platform capability.

An international line up of senior military, industry and academic speakers includes…

  • Colonel Sarah J Smith, Military Deputy, Assistant Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for Materiel Readiness and Maintenance Policy, Office of the Secretary of Defense, US Department of Defense
  • Colonel Michelle F "Shelley" Yarborough, Project Manager, Aviation Systems, Program Executive Office for Aviation, Aviation & Missile Command, US Army
  • Commander Mark Deaney, Team Leader, HUMS IPT, Defence Logistics Organisation, Ministry of Defence, UK
  • Thomas R Galie, Logistics and Maintenance RDTE Program Manager, Naval Surface Warfare Center, US Navy
  • Squadron Leader Andy Armstrong, Senior Structural Integrity Engineer – Rotorcraft, Directorate of Technical Airworthiness/Aerospace Engineering Support, Department of National Defence, Canada
  • Dr Jonathan Cook, Head, Prognostic Health Management Section, Material and Structures Group, Technical Enabling Services, Ministry of Defence, UK
  • John McColl Eur Ing CEng MIMechE, Head, Propulsion Branch, CAA Safety Regulation Group and Chairman, Helicopter Health Monitoring Advisory Group (HHMAG)
  • Professor David Zimmerman, Professor and Associate Chairman of Mechanical Engineering, Deptartment of Mechanical Engineering, University of Houston
  • Dr Andrew Halfpenny, Senior Technical Specialist, nCode International
  • Rupert England, Managing Director, Support Media Systems
  • David Stewart, Principal, AeroStrategy

With Special Guest Chair…

  • Major General (Ret’d) Murray Wildman CBE, Former Director General, Whole Fleet Management, Ministry of Defence, UK and Director, Defence Business Solutions

The Future of HUMS within Defence Maintenance should not be missed by anyone in the industry involved within maintenance, logistical support, procurement, capability and battlespace data/information management systems.

Benefits of Attending include:

  • DEVELOP your knowledge and understanding of the key concepts and advancements in HUMS, CBM, PHM and information centric approaches to maintenance
  • REVIEW the improvements in information management technologies for maintenance and logistical support
  • EXAMINE cutting edge international programmes and initiatives utilising HUMS and PHM for increased warfighting capability
  • LEARN how to overcome the challenges in implementing and integrating HUMS and PHM within service specific, tri-service and joint platforms
  • ENHANCE your understanding of how HUMS, CBM and PHM based policies and technologies will impact future maintenance and logistical support within the future battlespace

A full day post conference Mastercalss will also take place run by..

  • Dr Jonathan Cook, Head, Prognostic Health Management Section, Material and Structures Group, Technical Enabling Services, Ministry of Defence, UK and special guests.

Conference programme

8:30 Registration & Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Major General (Ret’d) Murray Wildman CBE

Major General (Ret’d) Murray Wildman CBE, Former Director General, Whole Fleet Management, Ministry of Defence, UK and Director, Defence Business Solutions Limited, Defence Business Solutions Ltd

9:10 EQUIPPING THE AMERICAN FORCES WITH A RELIABLE AND ROBUST CBM+ CAPABILITY

Colonel Sarah J Smith

Colonel Sarah J Smith, Military Deputy, Assistant Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for Materiel Readiness and Maintenance Policy, Office of the Secretary of Defense, US Department Of Defense

  • Optimising platform readiness, safety and reliability to ensure maximum capability
  • The challenges in creating and implementing policy for new and emerging maintenance technologies and systems
  • The US DoD requirements form effective maintenance systems
  • The impact of HUMS/future maintenance systems within the operational and logistical command chains
  • The effects will on future logistic and maintenance based policy and doctrine?
  • 9:40 THE EVOLVING CIVIL REGULATORY FRAMEWORK

    John  McColl Eur Ing CEng MIMechE

    John McColl Eur Ing CEng MIMechE, Chairman, Helicopter Health Monitoring Advisory Group (HHMAG) and Head, Propulsion Branch, Safety Regulation Group, Civil Aviation Authority, UK

  • Rotorcraft transmission design
  • Civil VHM background & safety data
  • EASA & CAA recent activity/proposals on HUMS
  • Update on ICAO proposals
  • Civil roadmap on VHM
  • Supporting actions including advisory material
  • 10:10 THE CHALLENGES IN IMPLEMENTING AND INTEGRATING HUMS WITHIN MILITARY AIRCRAFT

    Commander Mark Deaney

    Commander Mark Deaney, HUMS IPT Leader, Defence Logistics Organisation, Ministry of Defence, UK

  • Integrating the system – overcoming legacy systems, interoperability and human factors
  • The importance of accommodating ground stations – where does the balance of air and ground based data collection and analysis lie?
  • The need for standardisation and commonality across airborne and tri-service systems and how can we achieve this?
  • What is the UK MoD roadmap for air based HUMS installation and how will this affect future engineering and logistical processes?
  • Lessons learned from the past initiatives and current programmes
  • 10:40 Morning Coffee

    11:00 OPERATIONAL REQUIREMENTS AND US ARMY AVIATION HUMS GOALS (DIGITAL SOURCE COLLECTOR (DSC); INCLUDES HUMS & CVR/FDR)

    Colonel Michelle

    Colonel Michelle "Shelly" Yarborough, Project Manager, Aviation Systems, Program Executive Office for Aviation, Aviation & Missile Command, US Army

  • The effect of HUMS within US Army Aviation
  • Logistics transformation
  • Force Structure
  • Conduct of Operations
  • Ongoing demonstrations (Korea, Fort Campbell, Iraq)
  • Functionalities of differing systems
  • Engineering requirements
  • Maintenance procedure changes
  • Evaluation reports
  • Differing A/C development stages and what this means
  • Investment
  • Divestment of legacy A/C
  • Available technology
  • Fleet equipping options (affordability)
  • Application to developing programs
  • Condition Based Maintenance (CBM)
  • Military Flight Operations Quality Assurance (MFOQA)
  • Demonstrated and forecast benefits
  • Operational & Support (O&S) costs
  • Effects on Maintenance Man Hours (MMH)
  • Readiness effects
  • Combat experience
  • 11:30 HUMS - the Rolls-Royce perspective

    Ian Jennions

    Ian Jennions, EHM Global Capability Owner Services, Rolls Royce

  • HUMS is a key enabler to R-R being the customer's first choice for Aftermarket Services
  • HUMS growth has been a major contributor in the transformation from OEM to extended services under PBtH(tm) and Total Care Agreements
  • HUMS deployment is diverse but the data and information needs from platforms and operations are generic
  • HUMS exploitation builds on improving access, ease of transfer and interpretation of data.
  • HUMS capability, when fused with Fleet Management Information, is key to enormous potential improvements in cost management and customer value. Legacy platforms and bespoke infrastructures on new platforms are some of the challenges to achieving best customer value
  • 12:00 FAULT DIAGNOSIS AND PROGNOSIS WITHIN MILITARY AIRCRAFT

    Dr Jon Cook

    Dr Jon Cook, Head, Prognostic Health Management, Technical Enabling Services, Defence Logistics Organisation, Ministry of Defence, UK

  • The need for immediate availability of prognostic information to the User and Maintainer
  • Utilising the platform systems with platform specific software for enhanced diagnostic and test capabilities - the different pathways/choices for data capture and exploitation
  • Prognostics Health Maintenance (PHM) and Condition Based Maintenance (CBM)
  • The future of HUMS lies within Predictive Maintenance, Data Fusion/Exploitation and Aircraft Lifting – or does it?
  • What have the MoD learned from civil aircraft?
  • 12:30 Networking Lunch

    13:30 CAN WE REALLY PREDICT THE FUTURE?

    Professor David Zimmerman

    Professor David Zimmerman, Professor and Associate Chairman of Mechanical Engineering Department of Mechanical Engineering, University Of Houston

  • Working in extreme environments - damage identification using changes in structural dynamics
  • Identifying the faults - can we really predict the availability and reliability of a platform?
  • Non-destructive Evaluation tools and techniques for extending availability, safety and capability of platforms
  • Applying the technology and techniques successfully
  • Enhancing data collection, analysis, management and application from the platform for operational certainty
  • 14:00 HUMS DATA AND MANAGEMENT

    Dr Andrew Halfpenny

    Dr Andrew Halfpenny, Senior Technical Specialist, nCode International

  • Platform performance and HUMS
  • Diagnostics and prognostics indicators using limited data sets
  • HUMS data processing and data management
  • 14:30 INCREASING AIRWORTHINESS AND SAFETY IN CANADIAN AIR PLATFORMS

    Squadron Leader Andy Armstrong

    Squadron Leader Andy Armstrong, Senior Structural Integrity Engineer – Rotorcraft, Directorate of Technical Airworthiness/Aerospace Engineering Support, Department of National Defence, Canada

  • Ensuring the needed levels of air worthiness, safety, reliability, and ultimately capability in Canadian air platforms
  • Health and Usage within current and future platforms and fleets (Sea King, Griffon, Cormorant and H92)
  • Operating in extreme environments – what are the emerging requirements for future HUMS
  • Other options outwit HUMS – flight data recording of a different sort
  • Increasing safety and tactical proficiency – the roadmap ahead
  • 15:00 HUMAN FACTORS FOR HUMS

    Rupert England

    Rupert England, Managing Director and Technical Consultant, Support Media Systems

  • Why Human Factors (HF) for HUMS? Understanding the relevance, risks & benefits
  • Exploring the HF concerns (from data-level to organizational cluster-level)
  • Introducing Information Logistics
  • Contextualising requirements with 'DOTSPOC'
  • Sharing, minimizing and managing risk
  • Fostering a HUMS Community
  • 15:30 Afternoon Tea

    16:00 THE CONVERGENCE OF COMMERCIAL AND MILITARY MRO MARKETS AND TECHNOLOGIES

    David Stewart

    David Stewart, Principal, AeroStrategy

  • What are the critical trends in military MRO?
  • Analysis of spending within the military MRO arena – where does and where will the money go?
  • The introduction of PMAs, HUMS, and other advanced maintenance technologies/systems into the market and their impact on budgets, existing/future fleets, requirements, etc
  • Outsourcing MRO – the problems and challenges of third party provision and contractor logistics support
  • 16:30 CBM (+) AND PHM ON NAVAL MACHINERY AND PLATFORMS

    Thomas Galie

    Thomas Galie, Logistics and Maintenance RDTE Program Manager, Naval Surface Warfare Centre, US Navy

  • The challenges in monitoring and maintaining maritime platforms (afloat and ashore)
  • Integrating logistics and emerging maintenance concepts/technologies what must the Navy and the industry realise?
  • CBM (+) and PHM within the US Navy - alive and kicking?
  • Future directions?
  • 17:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

    17:10 Networking Drinks Reception for Speakers, Guests and Delegates

    +

    Workshops

    HUMS Capability, Functionality and Applicability – Understanding the Why and the How to
    Workshop

    HUMS Capability, Functionality and Applicability – Understanding the Why and the How to

    The Hatton, at etc. venues
    8th December 2005
    London, United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    51/53 Hatton Garden
    London EC1N 8HN
    United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    HOTEL BOOKING FORM

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

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