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Sea Basing is not about platforms, nor is it limited to logistics. Sea Basing is about access, manoeuvre, operational tempo, and initiative. The ability to shape and support military and interagency operations from a relatively secure and unobtrusive base offers unparalleled potential to the Joint Force Commander throughout the range of military operations.

Benefits of Attending:
  • DISCOVER the principles and policies behind the developing concept of Sea Basing
  • HEAR the latest strategic and technical details of specific Sea Basing projects and programmes
  • ACQUIRE knowledge from the leading governmental and military research institutes focused on Sea Basing
  • GAIN an invaluable insight into the theory and first practical results from Sea Basing initiatives
  • NETWORK with leading military and industry experts representing those nations entrenched in this discipline

A unique opportunity to learn from leading industry experts including:
  • Vice Admiral Charles W Moore, Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Fleet Readiness and Logistics, US Navy
  • Rear Admiral Jay Cohen, Chief of Naval Research, Office of Naval Research
  • Brigadier Charlie Hobson, Head of Section, DEC, Deploy, Sustain and Recover (DSR), Ministry of Defence, UK
  • Captain James Murray, Director, Experimentation, Transformation and Innovation, Second Fleet, US Navy
  • Lieutenant Colonel Michael Krause, Director, Future Warfighting, Royal Australian Army
  • Colonel Clayton F Nans, Director Reporting Program Manager, Advanced Amphibious Assault (DRPM AAA), US Marine Corps
  • Commander Jeremy Rigby, Head of Concept Development (Logistics), Maritime Warfare Centre, Ministry of Defence, UK
  • Vince Goulding, Project Leader, Marine Corps Warfighting Laboratory
  • Nick Linkowitz, Head, Logistics Vision Team, HQ US Marine Corps
  • Douglass John Williams, Project Manager, Deepwater Technology Group, Kellogg Brown & Root, Halliburton

Conference programme

8:30 Registration & Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Ervin Kapos

Ervin Kapos, Director, Operations Analysis Program, Office of Naval Research, US Navy

9:10 OPENING ADDRESS

Vice Admiral Charles W Moore

Vice Admiral Charles W Moore, Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Fleet Readiness and Logistics, US Navy

  • Logistics for future concepts
  • From a 20th century navy to a future one
  • Operational changes
  • Concept and their implementation
  • Organisational changes in the US Navy
  • 9:40 KEYNOTE ADDRESS

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  • Pre-positioned warfighting capabilities for immediate employment
  • Enhanced joint support from a fully netted, dispersed naval force
  • Strengthened international coalition building
  • Increased joint force security and operational agility
  • Minimised operational reliance on shore infrastructure
  • 10:20 ENHANCED NETWORKED SEA BASING

    Lieutenant Colonel (Ret’d) Patrick O’Bryan

    Lieutenant Colonel (Ret’d) Patrick O’Bryan, Head, Amphibious Requirements Branch, Futures Warfighting Division, Marine Corps Combatant Development Command, US Marine Corps

  • Marine Corps concepts
  • Sea Basing concept
  • Pillars of Sea Basing
  • Sea Basing video
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 SPECIAL ADDRESS

    Rear Admiral Jay Cohen

    Rear Admiral Jay Cohen, Chief of Naval Research, Office of Naval Research

  • Sea Basing Innovation Cell
  • Interface issues between a sea base and the supply and delivery vehicles
  • Intermediate Transfer Station (ITS), Deep Water Stable Crane Ship, and Sea Base Hub for further concept development
  • Concept designs will also include consideration of selective offload of cargo and use of re-configurable spaces for multi-use ships and platforms
  • Sea Base Hub
  • 12:00 INTERDISCIPLINARY SEA BASING RESEARCH

    Professor Charles Calvano

    Professor Charles Calvano, Technical Director, Naval Postgraduate School

    12:40 Lunch

    13:40 FUTURE LOGISTICS SUPPORT FROM THE SEA BASE

    Nick Linkowitz

    Nick Linkowitz, Head, Logistics Vision Team, HQ US Marine Corps

  • Enhanced sea based joint logistic command and control
  • Heavy equipment transfer capabilities
  • Intra-theatre high-speed sealift
  • Improved vertical delivery methods
  • Integrated joint and coalition logistic support
  • Common intermodal packaging
  • 14:20 TECHNICAL ASPECTS OF ADVANCED SEA BASE CONCEPTS

  • Sea Basing Innovation Cell
  • Interface issues between a sea base and the supply and delivery vehicles
  • Intermediate Transfer Station (ITS)
  • Deepwater Stable Crane Ship
  • Sea Base Hub
    • selective offload of cargo
    • use of re-configurable spaces for multi-use ships and platforms
  • Technical Issues
  • Mark Selfridge

    Mark Selfridge, UK MoD DSTL Exchange Officer, Naval Surface Warfare Center, Carderock Division

    Dr Colen Kennell

    Dr Colen Kennell, Naval Architect, Naval Surface Warfare Center, Carderock Division

    Michael S Gilbertson

    Michael S Gilbertson, Naval Architect, Division (UK MoD DPA Exchange Officer), Naval Surface Warfare Center, Carderock Division

    15:00 STRATEGIC SEALIFT FOR SEA BASING

    Captain Gunnar Borch

    Captain Gunnar Borch, Director, Sealift Co-ordinator Centre

  • Background
  • SCC method of work
  • Achievements
  • Observations
  • Future plans
  • 15:40 Afternoon Tea

    16:00 INTERFACE AND SUPPORT FOR SEA BASES

  • High speed sealift and high speed, small naval ship innovation cell projects
  • Speed, range, payload
  • Technology development requirements
  • Hull forms
  • Hydrodynamics
  • Loads, materials, and structures
    • Machinery
    • Technology exploration project
  • Dr Colen Kennell

    Dr Colen Kennell, Naval Architect, Naval Surface Warfare Center, Carderock Division

    Christopher N Broadbent

    Christopher N Broadbent, Naval Architect, DSTL, Ministry of Defence, UK

    16:40 MARITIME PREPOSITION FORCE FUTURE

    Martin Fink

    Martin Fink, Project Manager, Maritime Pre-Positioning Force, Future, PEO-Ships, PMS 325M

  • Acquisition on Sea Basing
  • What will be the capabilities of the future ships?
  • Optimisation of space
  • How they might look
  • Timetable
  • Studies and analysis
  • 17:20 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-registration & Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Professor Neville Brown

    Professor Neville Brown, Defence Engineering Group, University College London

    9:10 OPENING ADDRESS

    Commander Jeremy Rigby

    Commander Jeremy Rigby, Head of Concept Development (Logistics), Maritime Warfare Centre, Ministry of Defence, UK

  • Historical perspective
  • UK interpretation of the Joint Sea Base
  • Application in future UK military operations
  • Key capabilities required to optimise the utility of the Joint Sea Base
  • 9:40 KEYNOTE ADDRESS

    Lieutenant Colonel Mark Maddick

    Lieutenant Colonel Mark Maddick, Head of Concepts Develop Amphibious Operations, Royal Marines

  • UK exploitation of the Sea Base
  • Future UK amphibiosity
  • Concepts for future capabilities
  • 10:20 UK CAPABILITY PERSPECTIVE

  • Government policy and military equipment
  • Setting the recruitment
  • The role of DEC (DSR)
  • Equipment for Sea Basing
  • Floating support requirements
  • Future prospect in Sea Basing in the UK
  • Brigadier Charlie Hobson

    Brigadier Charlie Hobson, Head of Section, DEC Deploy, Sustain and Recover (DSR), Ministry of Defence, UK

    Martin Stone

    Martin Stone, Chief Officer, DEC, Deploy, Sustain and Recover (DSR), Ministry of Defence, UK

    11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 AUSTRALIAN SEA BASING

    Colonel Michael Krause

    Colonel Michael Krause, Director Future Warfighting, Military Strategy Branch, Australian Defence Force*

  • Experience in East Timor
  • High speed vessels
  • Future amphibious ideas
  • 12:00 JOINT FORCES MARITIME COMPONENT COMMANDER WAR GAME

    Captain James Murray

    Captain James Murray, Director, Experimentation, Transformation and Innovation, Second Fleet, US Navy

  • Concept and initiative development
  • Experimentation mapping process
  • Relationship with naval capabilities development process
  • Joint force integration
  • 12:40 Networking Lunch

    14:00 SEA VIKING 2004

    Vince Goulding

    Vince Goulding, Project Leader, Marine Corps Warfighting Laboratory

  • First steps in an experimentation program
  • Doctrine, organisation, training and equipment
  • Digital united
  • Command and control functions with reconnaissance surveillance and target acquisition
  • Future full implementation of STOM and an emerging Expeditionary Strike Group concept
  • 14:40 EXPEDITIONARY FIGHTER VEHICLE

    Colonel Clayton Nans

    Colonel Clayton Nans, Direct Reporting Program Manager, Advanced Amphibious Assault, US Marine Corps

  • Program update
  • Capabilities: mobility, lethality, survivability
  • Concept of employment in support of Sea Basing
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 COLUMN STABILIZED TECHNOLOGY – SEMISUBMERSIBLES AND TRIMERSIBLES

    Douglass John Williams

    Douglass John Williams, Project Manager, Deepwater Technology Group, Kellogg Brown & Root, Halliburton

  • Hull designs
  • Technical details
  • Comparative advantages
  • Scalable size
  • Applications – immediate and future
  • 17:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

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