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Recent conflicts have clearly demonstrated the awesome force multiplier effect of Airborne C2 and Early warning systems and their ability to allow commanders to make real time decisions with an accurate battlefield picture. The ability to receive and send accurate information instantaneously gives the Commanding Officer the ability to predict, plan and execute missions giving the utilising force the information to achieve dominance in land, sea and Air operations.

Thus Airborne C2 capability has become an imperative requirement in the modern defence world and as such is a rapidly growing area in a declining market. This conference brings together an internationally recognised panel of expert speakers who will be addressing not only the technological, interoperability and operational issues but the future developments in Airborne C2 as well.

If you are involved in any aspect of Airborne C2 and EW across the Armed Forces, in industry or in research cannot afford to miss this event.

Conference programme

8:30 Registration & Coffee

9:00 Chairwoman's Opening Remarks

Mun Fenton

Mun Fenton, Program Manager of Surface, Aerospace and Surveillance Technology, Office of Naval Research (US)

9:10 OPENING ADDRESS - FUTURE AIR WARFARE, MANIPULATINGLY THE AIRBORNE BATTLESPACE

Colonel Bradley Butler

Colonel Bradley Butler, Director AWACS Program, USAF

  • Controlling the Skies in the 21st Century
  • Evolving threats to Airborne C2 systems
  • Meeting the challenge, developments that must be made
  • Sweeping the skies, using modern datalinks to maximise force capability
  • Doctrine and technology, keeping the two in tandem
  • Where will we be in 20 years?
  • 9:40 KEYNOTE ADDRESS - DEPLOYING THE FLEET

    Major General Voellger

    Major General Voellger, NATO AEW Force Command, US Air Force

  • The operational environment; deployment and logistics
  • Mission profile and subsequent action
  • Operations out of Area; adapting the equipment
  • Kosovo; limitations of current capability in good defensive terrain
  • In field requirements due to unexpected situations
  • 21st Century demands of the Airborne C2 operator
  • 10:20 ARCHITECTURE REVOLUTION - THE TECHNICAL CHALLENGE

    Ralph W. Bush

    Ralph W. Bush, Executive Director, Tailored Situational Awareness Directorate, The MITRE Corporation

  • The architecture revolution that needs to happen
  • Building to the goal of a single integrated system
  • Achieving capability through commercial standards and equipment
  • Producing systems that smartly cope with increases in information
  • Future Path: extracting knowledge for coherent decision making
  • Sharing intelligence information in coalition operations
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 WHERE IS THE J-STAR HEADED?

    Colonel Gary Connor

    Colonel Gary Connor, Director Electronic Systems Centre, US Air Force

  • J-STARS Today
  • Continual developments in radar technology
  • Applying advanced optronic technology
  • Keeping the fighters informed, integrating the J-STARS into ground systems
  • Driving doctrine forward
  • Conclusion
  • 12:00 AIRBORNE GROUND SURVEILLANCE AND BATTLE MANAGEMENT

    Brigadier General Dave Nagy (USAF Ret)

    Brigadier General Dave Nagy (USAF Ret), Former Mission Area Director For Information Dominance, Northrop Grumman

  • Airborne Battle Management and the future of attack operations
  • Role of GMTI in dominant battlespace awareness
  • Implications of platform size on airborne ground surveillance and battle management
  • Airborne command and control and UAV ground surveillance
  • NATO Airborne Ground Surveillance
  • 12:40 Lunch

    14:00 SCANNING THE HORIZON

    Colonel N Ray Briscoe

    Colonel N Ray Briscoe, Director Sensors and Platforms Division, AC21SRC, US Air Force

  • Current sensor technology
  • Developing sensor technology
  • Future platform requirement
  • System Integration in the next century
  • Future of radar systems
  • Early warning capability
  • 14:40 TACTICAL DATALINKS AND INTEROPERABILITY

    W E Hoekstra

    W E Hoekstra, Principle Scientist, NATO C3 Agency

  • NATO C3 Agency’s work
  • Interoperability within current NATO
  • Tactical datalinks
  • Technological requirement
  • Interoperability and NATO expansion
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 MODERNIZING THE NATO AEW FLEET

    Captain Gunnar Borch

    Captain Gunnar Borch, Director, Sealift Co-ordination Centre, Royal Norwegian Navy

  • Current Fleet capabilities/Shortfalls
  • Ongoing improvements
  • Aim of current Modernization activities
  • COTS implementation challenges
  • Interoperability - Key to the Air War
  • The Next Steps Forward
  • 16:20 MULTI SENSOR INTERGRATION/ COMBAT ID FOR AEW

    Capt. P Shepherd (US Navy Ret)

    Capt. P Shepherd (US Navy Ret), Director of Advanced Technology, Northrop Grumman

  • Threats
  • Sensor Integration
  • Source, Link and SATCOM Integration
  • Applications to Combat ID
  • Benefits to the warfighter
  • 17:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    17:10 Informal Networking Drinks Reception for Speakers and Delegates

    8:30 Re-registration & Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Edwin L Armistead

    Edwin L Armistead, Senior Lecturer, US Armed Forces Staff College

    9:10 THE FUTURE OF AIRCRAFT CARRIER BASED AIRBORNE SURVEILLANCE AND NETWORK-CENTRIC WARFARE

    Commander Jim Clifton

    Commander Jim Clifton, Advanced Technology Director for ER-C, US Navy

  • Emergent Mission Drivers
  • One View of Network-Centric Warfare
  • Connectivity
  • New Sensors
  • Multi-Sensor/Multi-Source Integration
  • 9:40 UK AIRBORNE C2 EXPERIENCE

    Flt Lt Dave Clark

    Flt Lt Dave Clark, Air Warfare Centre, Royal Air Force (UK)

  • Current standpoint
  • Basic overview of recent work
  • Maintaining operational effectiveness
  • Operational experience of running an Airborne command
  • Problems in ensuring a seamless flow of information to the ground
  • Airborne C2 and interoperability within NATO
  • 10:20 THE UK AIRBORNE C2 INITIATIVE

    Peter Grigson

    Peter Grigson, ASTOR Lead Engineer, DERA

  • The MOD requirement
  • The system solution
  • Radar and sensor technology
  • Integrating the system into other digitisation efforts
  • Datalinks and fusion development
  • Upgrading the solution in the future
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 OPERATIONAL ANALYSIS OF ISTAR SYSTEMS

    Peter Stockel

    Peter Stockel, Senior Defence Analyst, Centre For Defence Analysis, DERA

  • Work being carried out on ISTAR systems
  • ISTAR Operational evaluation techniques
  • Operational concept experience
  • Cost Analysis and Effectiveness
  • Operational Analysis of ASTOR
  • 12:00 BALANCE OF INVESTMENT IN ISTAR

    Brian Stewart

    Brian Stewart, Senior Defence Analyst, Centre For Defence Analysis, DERA

  • The ISTAR Assessment Problem
  • Capturing Intelligence Requirements
  • Derivation Of Intelligence Requirements
  • Campaign Level Impact Of ISTAR Mixes
  • 12:40 Lunch

    14:00 POLISH MARITIME PATROL AIRBORNE RADAR SYSTEM

    Dr Eng Weislaw Klembowski

    Dr Eng Weislaw Klembowski, Deputy Director, Telecommunications Research Institute, Poland

  • Main missions of the Maritime patrol craft
  • Architecture of the Radar system
  • Radar and Command and Control workstation
  • Technology and design of the radar system
  • 14:40 PROJECT WEDGETAIL

    Dr Norbert Burman

    Dr Norbert Burman, Counsellor Defence Science, Australian High Commission

  • The Requirement for an airborne command and control system
  • Problems in selecting an airborne command and control system
  • Exploiting technology developments in modernisation and miniaturisation
  • Project lessons learned
  • Integrating airborne command and control
  • Project Wedgetail in the 21st century- upgrading and maintaining
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 THE ERIEYE PROJECT

    Erik Winberg

    Erik Winberg, Technical Manager Erieye, Ericsson Microwave Systems, Sweden

  • The Swedish AEW-System
  • ERIEYE/SIVAM, The Brazilian solution for surveillance of the Amazonas
  • ERIEYE for Greece
  • Technological developments
  • The Future of ERIEYE
  • 16:20 CLOSING ADDRESS - THE CROSS-EUROPEAN AIRBORNE C2 PROJECT

    Professor Peter Hoogeboom

    Professor Peter Hoogeboom, SOSTAR Project Manager, TNO, Holland

  • Project Aims; Integration concerns
  • Radar developments; GMTI developments
  • International collaborative issues
  • A briefing on the Stand Off Surveillance and Target Acquisition Radar (SOSTAR) project. A cooperation between companies from Germany (Dornier), France (Thomson), Italy (FIAR), The Netherlands (TNO-FEL) and now also Spain. This system has been designed to fulfil NATO’s AGS requirements. SOSTAR is based on modern scalable antenna technology and can be adapted to a range of platforms. The presentation will address general backgrounds to the class of ground surveillance systems based on SAR and MTI, specific details about SOSTAR (aims, participants and schedule, operation modes) and the relation to national programs.
  • THE SPEAKER: Peter Hoogeboom has been working in radar and Earth Observation for over 20 years at TNO Physics and Electronics Laboratory in The Hague, The Netherlands. Systems, algorithms and applications were developed by him and his group on Radar concepts and Signal processing for both civil and military needs. He managed among other projects the PHARUS experimental polarimetric phased array Synthetic Aperture Radar that was developed and extensively tested in The Netherlands. It was the first SAR to combine phased array technology with polarimetric capability.
  • TNO Physics and Electronics Laboratory (TNO-FEL), The Hague (The Netherlands), is one of the institutes of the Netherlands Organization for Applied Scientific Research (TNO). Although research at TNO-FEL is done mainly on behalf of the Netherlands Ministry of Defence, projects are also carried out for other ministries, institutions and companies.
  • 17:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

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