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I am delighted to present you with the finalised programme for SMi’s Second Annual Life Cycle Costing conference. This year’s event offers you an invaluable opportunity to update your knowledge of efficient long-term asset management in the defence sector.

I am sure you are aware that life-cycle costs account for the majority of the defence budget. Attending this conference will enable you to examine the major LCC principles and its place in the military. The presentation and case studies at this truly international event will also examine the following issues related to this crucial, yet insufficiently analysed area of modern defence procurement:

· LCC FOR EUROFIGHTER TYPHOON

· THE GRIPEN FIGHTER – LCC AS A PROGRAM REQUIREMENT

· THE JOINT STRIKE FIGHTER

· A FINNISH PERSPECTIVE ON LCC

· LIFE CYCLE COSTS IN SMART ACQUISITION

At SMi, we are proud to announce that we have assembled the leading military, industry and research experts to tackle the critical issues related to this increasingly important aspect of modern warfare. In particular, I would like to highlight the following speakers:

· Kjösti Huhtala, Researcher, Missile Technology, Finnish Defence Forces Material Command

· David Moore, Course Director, MSc Defence Logistics Management programmes, Cranfield University, Royal Military College of Science Dr.

· Derek S Wright, Head, Acquisition & Logistics Unit, Dept of Defence Management & Security Analysis, Cranfield University, Royal Military College of Science

· Dr David Kirkpatrick, Defence Engineering Group, University College London

· Jukka Raunio, Manager, Aeronautical Engineering, Patria Finavitec

· Craig Happel, Director – JSF Business Management, Lockheed Martin

If you are involved in any aspect of defence procurement you can not afford to miss this highly topical and timely event. This is your chance to meet the key figures in this field and discuss current and anticipated future developments.

Conference programme

8:30 Registration and Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Dr Derek  Wright

Dr Derek Wright, Head of Acquisition and Logistics, DOD Management and Security Analysis, Cranfield University

9:10 LIFE CYCLE COSTING IN A DEFENCE CONTEXT

David Moore

David Moore, Course Director, MSc Defence Logistics Management programmes, Cranfield University, Royal Military College of Science

  • LCC defined
  • The place of LCC in the military past, present and future
  • Out with the Old: In with the New
  • Smart Acquisition and LCC
  • Issues and wider implications
  • Only time will tell – whole life support

    The Way Forward

  • 9:40 DUTCH LIFE CYCLE COSTING (LCC)

    Marcel Smit

    Marcel Smit, Project Manager, LCC Studies, TNO FEL

  • Concept of LCC: The Dutch Approach
  • LCC as part of the procurement process
  • Recent examples LCC analyses
  • Development of using LCC methods during Operations and Support
  • Case Study
  • 10:20 A FINNISH PERSPECTIVE ON LCC

    Jukka Raunio

    Jukka Raunio, Manager, Aeronautical Engineering, Patria Finavitec

  • The benefits of early participation
  • The importance of local capacity when manufacturers have “lost interest” in the old product
  • The key elements of local know how
  • Examples: Hawk, Hornet
  • Conclusions
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 THE JOINT STRIKE FIGHTER

    Craig Happel

    Craig Happel, Director - JSF Business Management, Lockheed Martin

  • Evaluating the LCC for the JSF
  • Costing a jet fighter’s life cycle
  • Who will provide the maintenance for the fighter?
  • Was LCC taken into account in the design process?
  • The methods used
  • 12:00 LCC FOR EUROFIGHTER TYPHOON

    Guenter Kagerbauer

    Guenter Kagerbauer, Senior Manager, Parametric Cost Estimation and Technical Controlling, EADS Deutschland

  • LCC in design process
  • Maintenance concept
  • Evaluation of LCC’s
  • Methods and Tools
  • 12:40 Lunch

    14:00 THE DEVELOPMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION OF A SOFTWARE SUPPORT COST MODEL

    Julian Gibbs

    Julian Gibbs, Principal Consultant, Technical Manager, Whole Life Economics, BMT Reliabilitiy Consultants

  • Problem area
  • Solution approach
  • Data collection & analysis
  • Results
  • Implementation
  • 14:40 PROJECT COSTING AND SYSTEM PERFORMANCE

    Dr Mark Parsons

    Dr Mark Parsons, Executive Consultant, Systems Modelling , LSC Group

  • The importance of in-service performance and establishing the performance target
  • System dynamics, component interactions, and the traditional approach
  • Monte-Carlo Simulation: The way forward
  • A military system case study example
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 HELICOPTER LIFE CYCLE COSTING

    John Thompson

    John Thompson, Logistics Manager, Westland Helicopters

  • Whole life cycle cost
  • Direct maintenance cost
  • Reducing cost- inceasing sales - Availability - Repair polocy - Models - In service data
  • Conclusions
  • 16:20 LIFE CYCLE COSTS IN SMART ACQUISITION

    Dr David Kirkpatrick

    Dr David Kirkpatrick, Head of Defence Engineering Group, University College London

  • Reasons for Smart Acquisition (formerly Smart Procurement)
  • Smart relationships, smart strategies and smart management
  • Requirements for LCC in Smart Acquisition
  • Challenges in implementing LCC
  • Evaluating Smart Acquisition in the 21st century
  • 17:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Dr David Kirkpatrick

    Dr David Kirkpatrick, Head of Defence Engineering Group, University College London

    9:10 A FINNISH PERSPECTIVE ON LCC

    Kjösti Huhtala

    Kjösti Huhtala, Researcher, Missile Technology, , Finnish Defence Forces Material Command

  • The role that LCC plays in Finnish Procurement
  • Testing
  • Evaluation
  • Recent examples of procurement
  • The effect of LCC in these decisions
  • 9:40 THE GRIPEN FIGHTER – LCC AS A PROGRAM REQUIREMENT

    Joakim P. Rylander

    Joakim P. Rylander, Head of Business Support, Gripen Customer Service, SAAB

  • The customer need
  • Design phase - LCC as a system requirement
  • Operational phase – management of LCC – Drivers
  • Methods used for the life cycle management approach
  • 10:20 USING LIFE CYCLE COST ANALYSIS TO DEFINE COST EFFECTIVE TOTAL CARE PACKAGES

    Paul Roycroft

    Paul Roycroft, Life Cycle Specialist, Rolls Royce

  • Definition of total care
  • Clarity of requirements to accommodate - dynamic product environment - modular configuration
  • ROLLS-ROYCE TCP Simulation Techniques and Tools - Capability - Benefits - Costs
  • ROLS-ROYCE use of Simulation to Support Bid and Contract Common data and Reporting Structure
  • Importance of transition Planning and post Contact Award
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 E-BUSINESS-THE IMPACT ON COST

    Peter Turner

    Peter Turner, Director, Science Systems

  • E-business-Survey
  • E-business-Easy or Hard?
  • E-business-The Supply Chain Challenge
  • E-business-Cost Saving-True or False?
  • 12:00 THE BEST WAY TO PREDICT THE FUTURE IS TO CREATE IT”

    Paul Newman

    Paul Newman, Managing Director, Cost Engineering Consultants

  • LCC Methodology
  • “The time value of money”
  • “Cradle to grave”
  • Current research
  • New advances
  • The future – how realistic can LCC become?
  • 12:40 Lunch

    14:00 LCC FOR IN-SERVICE EQUIPMENT

    Brian Hewer

    Brian Hewer, Business Development Manager, Lex Multipart Defence

  • Bolt-on rather than built-in
  • Identifying cost drivers and managing them
  • Teaching old dogs new tricks
  • Cultural and skill-set changes for all parties
  • Birthing pains or experiential gains
  • New brooms increase the NSN count
  • 14:40 LIFE CYCLE COSTING

    Garth Shepard

    Garth Shepard, Managing Director, Envisage

  • Learning from experience to anticipate the risk
  • New technologies and techniques for predicting the project
  • Asking for a rehearsal
  • Being able to focus on potential problems
  • A case study in virtual prototyping
  • 15:40 LIFE CYCLE COSTING IS A STATE OF MIND

    Victor Fairey

    Victor Fairey, Principle Consultant, Dytecna

  • Model initial cost from Day 0
  • Evolve the model in the light of new data
  • Create/Structure model to suit individual requirements
  • Maintain control and traceability
  • Maintain confidence and credibility

    Prepare and generate meaningful reports

  • Build database/databank – archive for reference
  • 16:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks

    16:10 Afternoon Tea and Close of Conference

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

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