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Discover the latest developments in intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance…

Attending this event will enable you to keep abreast of the advancements in this arena. As an attendee, you will gain valuable insights into systems capability. It will also provide you with a thorough exploration of the latest projects and programmes to ensure that you can maximise your product offering.

Furthermore, this event will impart detailed analysis of country specific strategies and information on the latest solutions for improving, upgrading and replacing your existing systems and technologies. It will ensure that you are provided with information to enhance your current knowledge of this subject area. It will also examine all aspects of reconnaissance from the new technology and equipment through to coastal analysis, an exploration of airborne early warning systems and data interfacing. Other topics to be addressed include:

· Aerial, land, maritime and satellite reconnaissance

· Low frequency radar

· An operational analysis of ISTAR

· Data imagery

· Tactical analysis

· Armoured reconnaissance

· Country specific programmes

Register now to guarantee your place and to benefit from the experience of the leading military and industry experts

Conference programme

8:30 Registration and Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Tim Young

Tim Young, Business Group Manager, Vehicle Sub-Systems & Robotics, QinetiQ, Future Systems Technology

9:10 OPENING ADDRESS

Brigadier General W. Mixon Jr.

Brigadier General W. Mixon Jr., Deputy Commanding General, HQ US Army Armour Centre and Fort Knox

  • An overview of armoured reconnaissance
  • The role of armoured reconnaissance in the military
  • Passing of information to intelligence organisations and other services
  • An overview of the roles different armoured vehicles play in reconnaissance
  • Future of armoured reconnaissance in future campaigns
  • 9:40 UK KEYNOTE ADDRESS

    Group Captain R Garwood DFC ADC MA RAF

    Group Captain R Garwood DFC ADC MA RAF, Station Commander, Royal Air Force Marham

  • History of reconnaissance at RAF Marham
  • Tornado recce – 1990 to present day
  • The operational structure of the base
  • Passing of information to intelligence organisations and other services
  • An overview of the roles different aircraft play in reconnaissance
  • Future of reconnaissance at RAF Marham
  • 10:20 PROJECT AIR 87 UPDATE – ARMED RECONNAISSANCE IN A FUTURE ADF LAND FORCE

    Brigadier Mark Patch/Marci Joann

    Brigadier Mark Patch/Marci Joann, Director General Armed Reconnaissance Helicopter Branch/Project Director ARH, Aerospace Sys Div Defence Material Organisation, Australian Dept of Defence/Eurocopter International

  • The replacement of the Bell 206B-1 (Kiowa) and the UH1-H (Iroquois) and perceived needs
  • Procurement requirements and the development of Project Air 87
  • Tender procedures and processes selected

    Development of a new reconnaissance and fire support capability

  • The tender selection process

    Future role of Air 87 in Australian defence plans

  • The ADF requirement for an air manoeuvre capability in the land force

    How this influenced Eurocopter’s bid process

    The ADF tender evaluation and development process

  • Eurocopter’s role in tender development

    The result achieved in AIR 87.

  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 AIRBORNE EARLY WARNING SYSTEMS

    LCDR Edwin L Armistead

    LCDR Edwin L Armistead, Program Manager, Task Force Web, Chief of Naval Operations Staff, US Navy

  • History overview of AEW in the World’s defence forces
  • AEW platforms – a growth industry for the 21st century
  • The importance of AEW
  • The role of AEW and AWACS in reconnaissance
  • AEW and AWACS aircraft and components
  • Future of AEW technical developments and future programmes
  • 12:00 ADVANCED TACTICAL AIR RECONNAISSANCE SYSTEM (ATARS)

    Major Brian “Irish” Kelly

    Major Brian “Irish” Kelly, ATARS Project Officer, US Marine Corps, Naval Air Warfare Centre

  • Provision of organic aerial reconnaissance platform to Marine Expeditionary Force and commanding officers
  • To be located on fixed-wing Marine Aircraft Group (MAG) within the Marine Aircraft Wings (MAW)
  • ATARS captures and disseminates information via data links or tape, with EO, IR, and SAR imagery to TEG for exploitation
  • The squadron ground station or tactical exploitation group can produce digital imagery in a variety of formats
  • Data interfaces
  • Future developments of organic aerial reconnaissance
  • 12:40 Lunch

    13:40 LOW FREQUENCY RADAR

    Bjorn Larson

    Bjorn Larson, Research Manager, FOI

  • The importance of traditional radar in reconnaissance
  • An identification of need for increased radar detection of small grounded targets
  • The development process of low frequency radar
  • Key tactical advantages of low frequency radar
  • The future role of low frequency radar in the military campaign
  • 14:20 BELGIUM AIR FORCE UPGRADE RECONNAISSANCE

    LtCol Luc Gennart / Major Marc Scheers

    LtCol Luc Gennart / Major Marc Scheers, Belgian Air Staff – Section Policy, Plans and Requirements – Head of Requirements/Combat, Belgian Air Force

  • The Belgium Air Force introduce full electro-optical/infrared (EO/IR) tactical reconnaissance for its reaction forces
  • The multi-stage programme
  • Installation of Vinten’s Type 8042 sensors and Type 8010 cameras on BAF pods
  • The modification of 16 F-16A Operation Capability Upgrade standard aircraft to carry the pods
  • Further upgrades are under consideration.
  • 15:00 Afternoon Tea

    15:20 AIR FORCE DEVELOPS FUTURE RECONNAISSANCE SYSTEM

    Ron Crumbacher

    Ron Crumbacher, Sensor Directorate, Applications Division, Air Force Research Laboratory

  • Development of a next generation airborne unmanned reconnaissance system known as Sensor Craft could become operational in the 2015 – 2020 time frame
  • System attributes to the Sensor Craft are being able to perform multiple missions using multiple sensors and global coverage
  • Sensor Craft’s objective is to develop long range autonomous, stealthy, unmanned aerial vehicle
  • Envisioned missions could include detection of low observable cruise missiles, targets hidden under camouflage – such as tanks under canopies and so-called bi-static sensor operations
  • The design of the craft will have to include future threats (especially communication and information warfare-type threats)
  • The programme may also take advantage of technologies emerging from a future Air Force programme known as HILDA (High Lift-To-Drag Active wing)
  • 16:00 DATA COMMUNICATION IN RECONNAISSANCE

    David Jenny

    David Jenny, International ISR Marketing Engineer, L3 Communications Systems - West

  • The Common Data Link
  • Applications of Wide Band Line of Sight (LoS) links
  • Airborne and surface based equipment
  • Interoperability
  • Releasibility
  • 16:40 RECONNAISSANCE IN SPACE

    Ian Pilling

    Ian Pilling, Manager QinetiQ Satellite Ground Segment, Space Department, QinetiQ

  • Exploitation of civilian sources
  • Current and future data sources
  • Data to information
  • In filed reception and processing
  • Command and control of data collection
  • 17:20 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    LCDR Edwin L Armistead

    LCDR Edwin L Armistead, Program Manager, Task Force Web, Chief of Naval Operations Staff, US Navy

    9:10 KEYNOTE ADDRESS

    Captain C. Alan Easterling

    Captain C. Alan Easterling, Programme Manager for MMA, US Naval Air Systems Command

  • U.S. Navy expects to initiate a replacement programme for its P-3C maritime patrol aircraft
  • The Multi-mission Maritime Aircraft (MMA) encompassing a manned aircraft and an unmanned aerial vehicle
  • The service’s EP-3Es (due for retirement in 2004) are to be replaced with manned aircraft selected for the MMA,
  • UAVs such as the Global Hawk to be used instead of manned craft for wide areas for their ability to stay at altitude for long periods of time
  • Basing the UAVs at strategic bases, the whole planet could be covered
  • NAVAIR set to start competition, after completion of an Analysis of Alternatives
  • 9:40 MARITIME RECONNAISSANCE

    Squadron Leader Gary Morgan RAF

    Squadron Leader Gary Morgan RAF, OC Nimrod Operational Evaluation Unit (Detachment), RAF Air Warfare Centre BAES Warton

  • The RAF procures a new maritime patrol aircraft – the Nimrod MRA4
  • Contract led by BAES involving defence companies on both sides of the Atlantic
  • New Nimrod MRA 4 will have three primary missions: anti-submarine warfare, anti-surface warfare and search and rescue but will be multi-mission capable
  • The crew complement will be reduced from 13 to 10 and the new glass cockpit will be configured for two pilot operation
  • The mission system software is based on the Boeing E-3 and Indonesian surveiller programmes but has been customised to UK requirements
  • Twenty-one stripped-out Nimrod MR2 fuselages will be rebuilt to MRA 4 standard with first flight in 2002 and delivery in 2004
  • 10:20 UK ISTAR

    Major Mark Nash, Commanding Officer, 4MI Battalion, British Army

    Major Mark Nash, Commanding Officer, 4MI Battalion, British Army, and, Major Phil Ingram, Commanding, 3MI Company, British Army

  • ISTAR C2
  • Intelligence collection
  • Data fusion
  • Assignments and assessments
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 THE UK ISTAR RESEARCH

    Mike Burstow

    Mike Burstow, Capability Research Director, ISTAR, Central Science Staff, Ministry of Defence

  • Research in MoD
  • The ISTAR research challenges
  • Overview of programmes including highlights
  • Research under competition
  • 12:00 ISTAR ANALYSED

    Brian Stewart

    Brian Stewart, Senior Defence Analyst, Centre for Defence Analysis, Defence Science and Technology Laboratory

  • ISTAR assessment and evaluation
  • Defining the intelligence requirement
  • Portraying the intelligence where needed
  • Impact of ISTAR on the military environment
  • Future needs of ISTAR analysis
  • 12:40 Lunch

    14:00 A MIX OF ISTAR SYSTEMS

    Peter Robbie

    Peter Robbie, Director Business Development Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance, Raytheon Systems Ltd

  • Requirements
  • Understanding architectures and infrastructures
  • Scenarios, capabilities and cultural diferences
  • Cost versus performance
  • Procurement concepts and putting a stake in the ground
  • 14:40 UNMANNED VEHICLE RECONNAISSANCE

    Tim Young

    Tim Young, Business Group Manager, Vehicle Sub-Systems & Robotics, QinetiQ, Future Systems Technology

  • A historical overview of UGV reconnaissance & other roles
  • Current UGV reconnaissance programmes
  • UGV reconnaissance - strengths & weaknesses
  • The challenge to compliment existing ISTAR systems
  • The Future of UGV Reconnaissance – 2050 and beyond
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 TACTICAL ANALYSIYS

    Major Luis Castro

    Major Luis Castro, Operations Research Systems Analyst, TRADOC Fort Lee

  • Appropriation of tactic, techniques and procedures for the RAH – 66 Comanche, Future Scout and Cavalry (FSCS). The Tactical UAV (TUAV) employed as a combined arms reconnaissance capability
  • Results of how the Initial Brigade Reconnaissance, Surveillance and Target Acquisition (RSTA) Squadron, and Army XXI Cavalry Squadrons fulfill reconnaissance requirements using virtual and constructive simulation
  • C4ISR architecture requirements in support of reconnaissance missions
  • Improvements on existing methodologies, models and simulation structure in support of analysis concerning reconnaissance, intelligence, and situation awareness issues
  • Measures of Effectiveness (MOE’s) and Measures of Performance (MOP’s) collected and analysed
  • 16:20 INTELLIGENCE, SURVEILLANCE AND RECONNAISSANCE MANAGEMENT

    Curt Osterheld

    Curt Osterheld, Director ISR Operations, Boeing

  • Visualisation environment
  • Platform sensor tasking and control
  • Exploitation tools
  • Streaming video / archiving and exploitation
  • 17:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

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