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Major contributions from senior representatives:
William Urschel, Avionics Technical Advisor, Aging Aircraft Division, United States Air Force
· Lieutenant Colonel Glen Logan, Deputy Director, Open Systems Joint Task Force, United States Air Force
· Lieutenant Commander David Fitzjohn, FSE/AVS, Future Support Environment, Avionics Support, Defence Logistics Organisation, Ministry of Defence
· Squadron Leader Nick Tudor, FSE/SS, Future Support Environment, Software Support, Defence Logistics Organisation, Ministry of Defence
· Gary Nenninger, Project Manager, Aviation Systems, US Army Aviation PEO
· Dr Tony Gillespie, Leader, Avionics and Mission Systems, DSTL
· Gauthier Personnic, SPAé/ST/AAé, French Ministry of Defence
· Sylvain Fleurant, Manager, Technical Airworthiness for Avionics & Electrical Systems, Department of National Defence, Canada
· Paul Johnson, Head Airborne Mission Systems Research, Defence Science & Technology Organisation, Australia

Benefits of attending
· LEARN from leading decision-makers in the field of avionics and the recent developments in the current environment
· COMPREHENSIVE analysis of modern software development and technological advances
· EXPLORE the importance of affordable avionics in the race against obsolescence
· GAIN an intensive insight into open architecture and Aircraft EW systems
· APPRAISE the evolution of the avionics industry and meet its experts

Conference programme

8:30 Registration & Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Charles Hurst

Charles Hurst, Director, Dayton Operations, Information Spectrum

9:10 ACCELERATING APPLICATION OF OPEN SYSTEMS

Leavy Riggs Jr

Leavy Riggs Jr, Senior Systems Engineering Manager, Open Systems Joint Task Force, United States Air Force

  • Evolution of modern avionics architectures
  • Benefits and pitfalls of modular and open avionics
  • Case studies: AV-8B Harrier II and F-15 upgrades
  • Future directions in avionics developments
  • 9:40 FUTURE MILITARY AVIONICS

    Lieutenant Commander David Fitzjohn

    Lieutenant Commander David Fitzjohn, FSE/AVS, Future Support Environment, Avionics Support, Defence Logistics Organisation, Ministry of Defence

  • The problem with today’s avionics
  • Abstraction and modelling
  • Hardware architectures
  • Obsolescence management

    Modularity

  • Clever contracting
  • The vision
  • 10:20 AFFORDABLE AVIONICS FOR AGING AIRCRAFT

    Dr Tony Gillespie

    Dr Tony Gillespie, Leader, Avionics and Mission Systems, DSTL

  • Upgrade opportunities for avionics in the UK
  • Obsolescence issues affecting current and future capabilities
  • Parallels between the UK and US experiences
  • What the UK is doing about the problems
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 OPEN ARCHITECTURE FOR MISSION AVIONICS

    Hans Brandtberg

    Hans Brandtberg, Director, Strategy and Technology Management, Display and Reconnaissance Systems Division, SaabTech

  • The Distributed Integrated Modular Avionics concept
  • Technology insertion using a scalable systems architecture
  • The mission core avionics components: mission computer, video management
  • Mission display mode generation, digital maps, digital recording etc
  • Case studies: helicopter and fixed wing platforms
  • 12:00 AGING AVIONICS COMPUTER

    Dr Ben Calloni

    Dr Ben Calloni, Research Program Manager, Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company

  • Real-time embedded information systems
  • Current legacy avionics
  • Results
  • Upgrade strategies
  • Conclusion
  • 12:40 Lunch

    14:00 DUAL DEVELOPMENT IN AVIONICS

    Jean Paul Platzer

    Jean Paul Platzer, Deputy Vice President, Technical Management, Thales Avionics

  • Experience in military transport and helicopter avionics
  • Advances in commercial avionics, A380 experience
  • Future trends in technologies and function development
  • 14:40 INTRODUCING FORMAL METHODS INTO MILITARY AVIONICS SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT

    Emmanuel Ledinot

    Emmanuel Ledinot, DGT/DPR/DESA, Dassault Aviation

  • Late 90s: the need to reduce embedded software costs
  • Overview of technologies involved
  • Object orientated methods
  • Close cooperation with equipment suppliers for advanced development
  • Lessons learned
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 FUTURE OFFENSIVE AIR SYSTEM TECHNOLOGY

    William Stuart

    William Stuart, FOAS Chief Engineer, BAE SYSTEMS Avionics Group

  • Platform independent designs
  • De-risking critical technologies
  • Keeping options open
  • Thinking ahead to 2020 conflicts
  • Decision-making
  • Affordability
  • 16:20 THE STATE OF AVIONICS AND THE ROAD TO ADVANCED AVIONICS

    Ellis Hitt

    Ellis Hitt, Chairman, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA), Digital Avionics Technical Committee (DATC), Battelle Corporation

  • The problem – aging fleets with avionics 1-3 decades old
  • Mandated capabilities for operation in the global airspace
  • Cockpit modernization for enhanced situational awareness and communications
  • Economic impact of restricted operations
  • Business considerations related to achieving mandated capabilities
  • Regulatory approval and certification processes impact on cost and safety

    The road to affordable advanced avionics

  • 17:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Dr Tony Gillespie

    Dr Tony Gillespie, Leader, Avionics and Mission Systems, DSTL

    9:10 AVIONICS TRANSFORMATION

    William Urschel

    William Urschel, Avionics Technical Advisor, Aging Aircraft Division, United States Air Force

    9:40 ARMY AVIONICS

    Gary Nenninger

    Gary Nenninger, Project Manager, Aviation Systems, US Army Aviation PEO

  • Improved Data Modem
  • Aviation/ Joint Mission Planning System (AMPS/JMPS)
  • Joint Tactical Radio System (JTRS)
  • Global Positioning System (GPS) P3I
  • Global Air Traffic Management (GATM)
  • Advanced Avionics Technology Insertion (AATI) Overview
  • 10:20 SOFTWARE TECHNOLOGY

    Squadron Leader Nick Tudor

    Squadron Leader Nick Tudor, FSE/SS, Future Support Environment, Software Support, Defence Logistics Organisation, Ministry of Defence

  • Why does software cause so many problems?
  • What techniques can be used to overcome uncertainty?
  • Certification
  • Obsolescence management
  • Automation and long term support
  • Real Time Operating Systems

    Modularity

  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 RAFALE & MIRAGE 2000-9

    Gauthier Personnic

    Gauthier Personnic, SPAé/ST/AAé, French Ministry of Defence

  • The ASAAC standards: - The programme state - Results and perspectives
  • A first application step: - The Modular Data Processing Unit on RAFALE and MIRAGE 2000-9 aircraft
  • 12:00 CANADIAN DEFENCE’S TECHNICAL AIRWORTHINESS PROGRAM

    Sylvain Fleurant

    Sylvain Fleurant, Manager, Technical Airworthiness for Avionics & Electrical Systems, Department of National Defence, Canada

  • Aviation safety program

    DND/CF Airworthiness (AW) Program

  • Comparison of civil and military AW standards
  • Technical airworthiness risk levels
  • System safety assessment process
  • Application to fleets and new acquisitions
  • Martime helicopter acquisition – system safety program
  • 12:40 Lunch

    14:00 AVIONICS PLANNING AND EXECUTION II (AVPLEX II)

    Charles Hurst

    Charles Hurst, Director, Dayton Operations, Information Spectrum Inc

  • AVPLEX elements have proven effective in programs: Open Systems, Life Cycle Cost and Migration Strategy
  • Application in modification programs is aided by the use of new process tools
  • Viability assessment looks at the downstream impact of current design
  • Integrated change roadmapping combines the program planning elements
  • Incorporation into solicitation documents needed for clear understanding
  • 14:40 MIG-29 MODERNISATION PROGRAMME

    Rainer Hankowiak

    Rainer Hankowiak, Business Development Manager, Miitary Aircraft, EADS - Deutschland

  • Mission computer
  • CNI
  • Fire control system
  • New weapons integration
  • Enhanced capabilities
  • 15:20 AIRCRAFT EW SYSTEMS

    Roger Hannaford

    Roger Hannaford, Business Development Europe, IDT-Metric

  • EW threat generators
  • Real signals or simulators?
  • The need for routine test and training
  • Recording time space position information
  • 16:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks followed by Afternoon Tea

    Close of Conference

    +

    Workshops

    USAF Avionics Strategic Roadmap Process
    Workshop

    USAF Avionics Strategic Roadmap Process

    The Hatton, at etc. venues
    19th February 2003
    London, United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    51/53 Hatton Garden
    London EC1N 8HN
    United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    HOTEL BOOKING FORM

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

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