Home
overview
Benefits of Attending:
IDENTIFY the key technologies and future requirements of armour and anti-armour
ESTABLISH key contacts through targeted networking opportunities
GAIN an invaluable insight into country specific armour and anti-armour programmes
ASSESS the latest survivability technologies
LEARN the future direction of key industry players
RAISE the profile of your organisation and its activities

A unique opportunity to learn from leading military and industry experts including:
Colonel Charles Betack, TRADOC System Manager for Stryker and Bradley Fighting Vehicles Systems, US Army Infantry School
Colonel Jed Sheehan, Project Manager, Kinetic Energy Missiles, US Army
Colonel John Weinzettle, Project Manager, CCMS Project Office, PEO Tactical Missiles, US Army
Colonel Donald Kotchman, Project Manager, Abrams Tank System, PEO Ground Combat Systems, US Army
Lt Col R J Laidler, Head of Future Business Group, ABRO
Neil McCabe, Team Leader, Joint and Battlefield Trainers, Simulations and Synthetic Environments Integrated Project Team (JBTSE IPT), Defence Procurement Agency
Colin Newell, Research Requirements Manager for Mounted Combat Systems, Directorate of Equipment Capability (Direct Battlefield Engagement), UK Ministry of Defence
Dr Gustaf Olsson, Assistant Director of Research, Swedish Defence Research Establishment (FOI)

Conference programme

8:30 Registration and Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Professor Richard Ogorkiewicz

Professor Richard Ogorkiewicz, Visiting Professor, Royal Military College of Science

9:10 STRYKER BRIGADE COMBAT TEAMS

Colonel Charles Betack

Colonel Charles Betack, TRADOC System Manager for Stryker and Bradley Fighting Vehicles Systems, US Army Infantry School

  • The concept behind ICBT
  • The armour and anti-armour requirements of the force
  • Present armour capabilities
  • The mobility survivability trade off
  • What future technologies will enhance the SBCT?
  • 9:40 ANTI-ARMOUR WITHIN FUTURE COMBAT SYSTEMS

    Colonel Donald Kotchman

    Colonel Donald Kotchman, Project Manager, Abrams Tank System, PEO Ground Combat Systems, US Army

  • Changing role of program management for current forces
  • Transitioning to support transformation
  • Logistics support considerations for current and future systems
  • 10:20 NEW CONCEPTS IN LIGHT ARMOURED VEHICLES

    Eanna Timoney

    Eanna Timoney, Technology Director, Timoney Technology

  • Historical review of Timoney mobility solutions to illustrate the constraints
  • Review of conflicting demands - weight/mobility/ protection
  • Description of two concept vehicles addressing these issues
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 THE ISSUE – HOW TO MAINTAIN LINE OF SIGHT UNDER ADEQUATE PROTECTION WHILE ENGAGING HEAVY ARMOURED FORCES

    Jan Falck Schmidt

    Jan Falck Schmidt, CEO, E. FALCK SCHMIDT Defence Systems

  • The importance of anti-armour capabilities
  • The Elevated TOW System (ETS)
  • Advantages of an Anti-Tank Guided Missile LAV (ATGM)
  • Advantages over a hand-held system
  • Anti-armour system for medium forces
  • Future systems
  • 12:00 THE INNOVATIVE LINE-OF-SIGHT ANTI-TANK (LOSAT) SYSTEM

    Colonel Jed Sheehan

    Colonel Jed Sheehan, Project Manager, Kinetic Energy Missiles, US Army

  • Requirements and capabilities of the weapon
  • The Kinetic Energy Missile
  • The fire control system
  • The anti-tank capability for future light forces
  • Other platforms and the future
  • 12:40 Lunch

    14:00 ANTI-ARMOUR IN THE US

    Colonel John Weinzettle

    Colonel John Weinzettle, Project Manager, CCMS Project Office, PEO Tactical Missiles, US Army

  • US family of anti-armour weapons overview - Javelin, TOW, and launchers (ITAS, IBAS)
  • Current capabilities - lethality, mobility and surveillance
  • Future anti-armour requirements and capabilities
  • Anti-armour support for the legacy, interim and objective force
  • 14:40 USMC FIREPOWER UPGRADE FOR TANKS

    Major Jeffrey Barber

    Major Jeffrey Barber, Armour Requirements, US Marine Corps

  • USMC M1A1 tank Firepower Enhancement Program (FEP)
  • Mission
  • System description
  • Performance characteristics
  • Current status
  • Upcoming events
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 THE FUTURE OF 120 MM TANK AMMUNITION

    Jean-Michel Quenecan

    Jean-Michel Quenecan, Programme Manager - Tank Ammunition, GIAT industries

  • Optimisation of current APFSDS (penetration, accuracy)
  • ETC developments
  • Top attack (lateral acting warheads)
  • Guided rounds
  • 16:20 ANTI-ARMOUR MISSILES

    Amnon Ben-Yosef

    Amnon Ben-Yosef, Marketing Manager SPIKE Program, Rafael

  • Requirements of anti-tank missiles
  • Systems developed by Rafael
  • Capabilities afforded by next generation technology
  • How will the anti-armour capability be improved in the future?
  • 17:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Chris Foss

    Chris Foss, Editor, Jane’s Land Forces

    9:10 CV90

    Alfons Falk

    Alfons Falk, Head of Development Department, Alvis Hägglunds

  • Development requirements
  • The principles behind the vehicle
  • Strengths of the CV90
  • What new technologies does it incorporate?
  • Future potentials
  • 9:40 DAS IN A NETWORK CENTRIC WARFARE ASPECT

    Dr Gustaf Olsson

    Dr Gustaf Olsson, Assistant Director of Research, Swedish Defence Research Establishment (FOI)

  • EW threat
  • EW survivability
  • Using EW suites for protection
  • Using EW on the offensive
  • Can EW suites reduce the need for armour?
  • Future EW capabilities
  • 10:20 APPROACH TO AN INTEGRATED SURVIVABILITY SYSTEM

    Colin Newell

    Colin Newell, Research Requirements Manager for Mounted Combat Systems, Directorate of Equipment Capability (Direct Battlefield Engagement), UK Ministry of Defence

  • Heavy armour alternatives for lightweight AFVs
  • Layered approach - identifying system contributions & boundaries
  • Systems integration
  • DAS controller and open architecture
  • Future programme
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 VEHICLE PROTECTION AT FMV

    Patrik Persson

    Patrik Persson, Technology Area Co-ordinator Survivability, Swedish Defence Material Administration (FMV)

  • Present requirements
  • New technologies developed
  • Mine protection for vehicles
  • Possible applications of technology
  • Future projects
  • 12:00 DAS

    Jerry Sollick

    Jerry Sollick, Technical Manager, QinetiQ

  • The need for DAS
  • The threat spectrum - the need for role configurable DAS
  • Flexible architecture requirements and options
  • Sub-systems - Octopus, an assessment capability
  • A soft kill DAS System for light AFVs
  • 12:40 Lunch

    14:00 PROTECTION OF MBTS

    Marc Chassillan

    Marc Chassillan, Armoured Systems Concept Manager, GIAT Industries

  • The new type of operational engagements
  • The add-on kit approach
  • Active protection integration
  • The mine threat
  • Application to the Leclerc MBT
  • 14:40 TRAINING AFV (ARMOURED FIGHTING VEHICLES)

    Neil McCabe

    Neil McCabe, Team Leader, Joint and Battlefield Trainers, Simulations and Synthetic Environments Integrated Project Team (JBTSE IPT), Defence Procurement Agency

  • AVTS (Armoured Vehicles Training Service)
  • CATT (Combined Arms Tactical Trainer)
  • TES (Tactical Engagement Simulation)
  • 15:20 FUTURE OF ARMOUR SUPPORT

    Lt Col R J Laidler

    Lt Col R J Laidler, Head of Future Business Group, ABRO

  • Has the logistic burden of armour become too heavy?
  • The future for logistic support and repair
  • Developments in armour support
  • Faster delivery of armoured forces
  • The importance of interoperability in armoured support
  • 16:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks, followed by Afternoon Tea
    Close of Conference

    +

    Workshops

    Survivability for Light and Medium Armoured Vehicles
    Workshop

    Survivability for Light and Medium Armoured Vehicles

    The Hatton, at etc. venues
    26th February 2003
    London, United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    51/53 Hatton Garden
    London EC1N 8HN
    United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    HOTEL BOOKING FORM

    Title

    SubTitle
    speaker image

    Content


    Title


    Description

    Download


    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

    Event Title

    Headline

    Text
    Read More

    I would like to speak at an event

    I would like to attend an event

    I would like to sponsor/exhibit at an event

    SIGN UP OR LOGIN

    Sign up
    Forgotten Password?

    Contact SMi GROUP LTD

    UK Office
    Opening Hours: 9.00 - 17.30 (local time)
    SMi Group Ltd, 1 Westminster Bridge Road, London, SE1 7XW, United Kingdom
    Tel: +44 (0) 20 7827 6000 Fax: +44 (0) 20 7827 6001
    Website: http://www.smi-online.co.uk Email: events@smi-online.co.uk
    Registered in England No: 3779287 VAT No: GB 976 2951 71




    Forgotten Password

    Please enter the email address you registered with. We will email you a new password.