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The Seventh annual Armour & Anti-Armour conference will build on the success of our previous Armour & Anti-Armour conferences. The conference will address the key Military’s Armour & Anti-Armour requirements in relation to current and future Military operations from an operational and unit level perspective. It will also look at rapid deployment concentrating on lessons learned from recent operations in Afghanistan and Iraq.

This event will consider the latest developments in this field, evaluating modern and current technologies and discuss how future plans, policies and programmes will effect Military capability in future operations. In addition to UK and US strategies and programmes, there is a wide international field of expertise to draw on to relay this information.

This conference will focus on the changing nature of land warfare and the advances and developments that are being made in both armour and anti armour munitions. It will look at tank’s survivability using active protection systems. It will also examine the recent and future developments that are driving research and development for armour and anti-armour technologies.

International case studies and perspectives from leaders in the field:
· Brigadier Ian Rodley, Director Equipment Capability, Ground Manoeuvre, Ministry of Defence, UK
· Brigadier Martin Rutledge, Director Royal Armoured Corps, British Army
· Colonel Erich Lang, Section Chief Armoured Vehicles, Ministry of Defence, Germany
· Colonel Curtis McCoy, Project Manager, Combat Systems, US Tank Automotive & Armament Command
· Colonel Mike Beasock, Infantry System Manager, US Army TRADOC
· Colonel Anders Carell, Head of Land Forces Development Department, Swedish Armed Forces Headquarters
· Lieutenant Colonel Chris Shalosky, Product Manager, FCS Special Programs, US Army
· Lieutenant Colonel Luc Petit, Directorate Land Requirements 3, National Defence Headquarters, Canada
· Major Andy Power, Equipment Capability Ground Manoeuvre, Ministry of Defence, UK
· Major Paul Moore, Project Officer, Anti-Armour Systems, US Marine Corps
· Dr Bryn James, Group Leader, Physical Protection, dstl
· Dave Shepherd, Leader, Mounted System Assessment, dstl
· Professor Manfred Held, Scientific Adviser, EADS

Benefits of Attending:
· MAXIMISE your understanding of armour and anti-armour future requirements
· GAIN invaluable insight into the status of armour and anti-armour programmes
· EXPAND your knowledge of system developments
· INCREASE your awareness of country-specific advances
· DEVELOP key contacts through this focused networking forum

“A lot of information in two days. Very comprehensive and valuable”
Major Walter Posch, Austrian Armed Forces

“Picked up a lot of useful information. Awareness that problems are world-wide”
Colin Newell, Ministry of Defence UK

Conference programme

8:30 Registration and Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Professor Richard Ogorkiewicz

Professor Richard Ogorkiewicz, Visiting Professor, RMCS, Cranfield University

9:10 OPENING ADDRESS

Brigadier Ian Rodley

Brigadier Ian Rodley, Director Equipment Capability, Ground Manoeuvre, Ministry of Defence, UK

  • Examining the future of armoured forces
  • UK initiatives to prepare for future armoured combat
  • The tank in the modern battlespace
  • Tank modernisation
  • Improved protection
  • Capability for the future: requirements and responses
  • 9:40 THE IRAQI WAR AND THE RENAISSANCE OF THE BATTLE TANK

    Brigadier Martin Rutledge

    Brigadier Martin Rutledge, Director Royal Armoured Corps, British Army

  • Overview of operations
  • Modifications implemented before engagement
  • Necessary improvements identified
  • Lessons learned - tank armour - munitions and armaments - all arms integration
  • Considerations and developments for the future
  • 10:20 US MECHANIZED FORCES BATTLEFIELD DAMAGE

    Colonel Curtis McCoy

    Colonel Curtis McCoy, Project Manager, Combat Systems, US Tank Automotive & Armament Command

  • Army readiness in Iraqi War - mobility - lethality - survivability
  • Investigating the warfighting capacity
  • Operational assessment
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 DEFENSIVE AID SUITES

    Lieutenant Colonel Luc Petit

    Lieutenant Colonel Luc Petit, Directorate Land Requirements 3, National Defence Headquarters, Canada

  • Evaluating technical and tactical performance - optimum combination of technologies - correct tactical employment
  • Improvements in battlefield effectiveness
  • Developments of operating procedures
  • Design, construction and integration of a DAS
  • Key features and requirements for future systems
  • 12:00 REACTIVE ARMOUR AND AFV PROTECTION

    Dr Manfred Held

    Dr Manfred Held, Scientific Adviser, EADS

  • Developments of reactive armour
  • The threat of shaped charge warheads
  • The benefits of add-on armour
  • Required protection against Kinetic Energy (KE) attack
  • Recognising and preparing for all elements of attack
  • Evolving threats to AFV’s and possible protection developments
  • 12:40 Networking Lunch

    13:40 ELECTRIC ARMOUR

    Dr Bryn James

    Dr Bryn James, Group Leader, Physical Protection, Dstl

  • Protection requirements against RPG’s or other shaped charged warheads - recognising and reducing the threat - the demand for lighter armour
  • Background of the ‘Pulsed Power’ system
  • Benefits and limitations
  • Areas of development
  • Implementation
  • 14:20 CONSIDERATIONS FOR ARMOURED VEHICLE SURVIVABILITY & LETHALITY

    John Davidson

    John Davidson, Business Development Manager, Alvis

  • The threat
  • Considerations for enhancing levels of survivability
  • Mobility vs lethality
  • Implementable firepower - operational - vehicle requirements
  • The move towards lighter, more adaptable systems
  • 15:00 “FLY LIGHT, DIE EARLY?”

    Dave Shepherd

    Dave Shepherd, Leader, Mounted System Assessment, dstl

  • The underlying UK requirement for air deployability
  • International developments in a strategic lift capability
  • Implications of strategic lift constraints for future UK AFV survivability
  • Implications for current UK AFV initiatives
  • 15:40 Afternoon Tea

    16:00 US MARINE CORPS ANTI-ARMOUR

    Major Paul Moore

    Major Paul Moore, Project Officer, Anti-Armour Systems, US Marine Corps

  • Current USMC anti-armour requirements
  • Current USMC anti-armour programs
  • Future USMC anti-armour programs
  • New concepts and considerations
  • 16:40 WARHEAD DESIGN

    Christian Herren

    Christian Herren, Director of Innovation and Quality, RUAG Munition

  • Considering warhead requirements - lethality - weight - mobility
  • Warhead specifics
  • Implementing warhead design
  • Current developments
  • 17:20 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Chris Foss

    Chris Foss, , International Armoured Fighting Vehicle Expert and Author

    9:10 US – FUTURE COMBAT SYSTEM (FCS)

    Lieutenant Colonel Chris Shalosky

    Lieutenant Colonel Chris Shalosky, Product Manager, FCS Special Programs, US Army

  • Goals of FCS program
  • Performance factors
  • Concept and Technology Demonstration (CTD)
  • Transitional phase toward implementation
  • 9:40 UK – FUTURE RAPID EFFECT SYSTEM (FRES)

    Major Andy Power

    Major Andy Power, Equipment Capability Ground Manoeuvre, Ministry of Defence, UK

  • Increasing British land force capability
  • Considerations and risks - timeframe - cost - maturity of technologies
  • Main criteria
  • Integrating system upgrades
  • The role of industry
  • 10:20 GERMANY – NEW PROJECTS

    Colonel Erich Lang

    Colonel Erich Lang, Section Chief Armoured Vehicles, Ministry of Defence, Germany

  • DINGO, BOXER, PUMA and other projects
  • Identifying criteria - weight - protection
  • Current considerations for the future
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 SWEDEN – DEVELOPING PROGRAMMES

    Colonel Anders Carell

    Colonel Anders Carell, Head of Land Forces Development Department, Swedish Armed Forces Headquarters

  • System/armament requirements
  • Background to new programmes - Swedish SEP programme
  • Multi-role functionality and capability
  • Concept design and integration
  • Recognising and meeting the demands of the future
  • 12:00 FRANCE - EBRC

    Gerald Lefebvre

    Gerald Lefebvre, Business Development – UK and Germany, GIAT Industries

  • French background (hard-kill, soft-kill)
  • Trade-off and system consideration
  • On-going studies and assessment
  • Perspective
  • 12:40 Networking Lunch

    13:40 CANADA - MULTI-MISSION EFFECTS VEHICLE

    Major (Ret’d) Mark Espenant

    Major (Ret’d) Mark Espenant, Project Manager FAVS/MMEV, Defence R&D Canada

  • Background to Future Armoured Vehicle System (FAVS) program
  • Current developments - new vehicle concept and force structure development - soldier-machine Interface design - technologies - virtual environment
  • Evaluations in real and virtual environments
  • Possible implementation
  • 14:20 OPERATIONAL CONSIDERATIONS

    Mark Saunders

    Mark Saunders, Principal Scientist/Technical Leader Mine Protection, dstl

  • Implications of mine explosive impact
  • Effective means of defence
  • Implementable solutions
  • Current programmes – successful case studies
  • Ongoing areas of development
  • 15:00 US ANTI-ARMOUR MISSILES

    Colonel Mike Beasock

    Colonel Mike Beasock, Infantry System Manager, US Army TRADOC

  • US anti-armour missile strategy
  • Programmes in use - Line-Of-Sight Anti-Tank (LOSAT) - Kinetic Energy (KE) missile systems
  • Using chemical energy in missile systems
  • Improvements and developments
  • Considerations for the future
  • 15:40 Afternoon Tea

    16:00 THE 3RD PLUS 4TH GENERATION OF LAND PRECISION WEAPON SYSTEMS

    Amnon Ben-Yosef

    Amnon Ben-Yosef, Marketing Manager, Anti-Armour Directorate, Missile Division, Rafael

  • Concept
  • Suitability to a variety of operational scenario challenges
  • Programmes and products
  • Considerations for the future
  • 16:40 GUN LAUNCHED WEAPON SYSTEM

    Moshe Shavit

    Moshe Shavit, Manager, Business Development, Israeli Aircraft Industry

  • Why Precision Guided Munitions (PGMs)?
  • Requirements for land forces and tank PGM
  • IAI Solution
  • Hit probability and threat
  • Increased survivability
  • System benefits
  • 17:20 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

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    Workshops

    Survivability for Light and Medium Armoured Vehicles
    Workshop

    Survivability for Light and Medium Armoured Vehicles

    The Hatton, at etc. venues
    20th February 2004
    London, United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    51/53 Hatton Garden
    London EC1N 8HN
    United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    HOTEL BOOKING FORM

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

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    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

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    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

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