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In today’s’ climate, the armed forces will have to focus on anticipating the forthcoming challenges and reacting to the increasing importance of enhanced training. Defence Training 2004 will consider the trends emerging within the international training environment and the impact this will have on today’s battlefield

Defence Training will examine the changes in policy and doctrine within the international market, focusing on new developments and implementation strategies. It will consider the current issues for defence training within the tri-service arena. It will also examine the synthetic environment and simulation training developments and look at the new developments for defence training systems.

Defence Training 2004 will discuss how to develop a more focussed, cost-effective and forward thinking defence training and education system; a system with the capability and flexibility to help generate Armed Forces for the 21st Century which can operate, survive and win.

Benefits of Attending:
· ANALYSE the challenges facing modern military training
· UNDERSTAND the role simulation plays in effective military training
· LEARN the importance of joint training programmes
· HEAR how to develop cost-effective training
· REVIEW the latest developments in the tri-service arena

A unique opportunity to learn from leading industry experts including:
· Major General AD Leakey CBE, Director General, Army Training and Recruiting Agency (ATRA)
· Colonel James Nunn, Commander, US Army Training Support Center (ATSC)
· Colonel Antal Ughy PhD, Chairman NATO Training Group Joint Service Sub-Group, Chief NATO Training Group Staff Element, NATO Training Group, OPS DIV, IMS, NATO HQ
· Colonel Nigel Gallier, DACOS Training, Allied Command Europe Rapid Reaction Corps*
· Colonel Robin Clifford, Head, International Defence Training (Army), British Army
· Colonel Wolfgang Krippl, Director, German UN Training Centre
· Wing Commander Terry Jones, Requirements Manager, United Kingdom Military Flying Training System, Ministry of Defence UK
· Andy Fawkes, Deputy Director, UK Directorate of Analysis, Experimentation and Simulation, Ministry of Defence, UK
. Lieutenant Colonel Anthony De Ritter, Comd, UK CATT, British Army
· Jonathan Downing, PPP/PFI Partnering, Directorate for Broadening Smart Acquisition, Ministry of Defence, UK
*Subject to final confirmation

"A well assembled programme, well managed...."
Sir Colin Terry, Defence Advisor, Aermacchi, Previous Delegate at SMi’s Fighter Trainer Conference

Conference programme

8:30 Registration and Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Russell Searle

Russell Searle, Director, RJD Technology

9:10 KEYNOTE ADDRESS

Major General AD Leakey CBE

Major General AD Leakey CBE, Director General, Army Training and Recruiting Agency (ATRA)

  • Training armed forces for future conflicts
  • The importance of training on the modern battlefield
  • Implementing the Defence Review
  • Individual training priorities for the British Army
  • 9:40 US ARMY TRAINING SUPPORT

    Luciano Iorizzo

    Luciano Iorizzo, Deputy Commander, US Army Training Support Centre (ATSC)

  • ATSC’s global vision
  • The ATSC’s mission
  • Providing warfighters with effective training for future conflicts
  • ATSC’s role in developing future training programmes
  • TSS future training video
  • 10:20 TRAINING SOLDIERS FOR FUTURE OPERATIONS

    Colonel Nigel Gallier

    Colonel Nigel Gallier, DACOS Training, Allied Command Europe Rapid Reaction Corps

  • Aim and purpose of military training
  • Training requirements for modern armed forces
  • Maintaining operational effectiveness across the whole spectrum of future conflict
  • What is meant by effective training?
  • Implementing lessons learned from past operations
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 UK COMBINED ARMS TACTICAL TRAINER

    Lieutenant Colonel Anthony De Ritter

    Lieutenant Colonel Anthony De Ritter, Comd, UK CATT, British Army

  • Test & acceptance process
  • Training with CATT
  • Future aspirations
  • 12:00 NEW DEVELOPMENTS IN ARMY TRAINING

    Major Alistair Rule

    Major Alistair Rule, Officer in Command, Urban Operations Wing, British Army

  • Fulfilling the requirements for urban training
  • Simulation technology that will be used in urban training
  • The urban training programme
  • Implementing lessons learned from Operation Telic
  • Future developments in urban warfare training
  • 12:40 Networking Lunch

    14:00 AIRFORCE TRAINING

    Wing Commander Terry Jones

    Wing Commander Terry Jones, Requirements Manager, United Kingdom Military Flying Training System, Ministry of Defence, UK

  • Acquiring a new Military Flying Training System (UKMFTS)
  • The vision for the UKMFTS
  • Requirements the UKMFTS should meet
  • Aspirations for the system
  • 14:40 NAVAL TRAINING

    Senior Representative

    Senior Representative, from, Maritime Warfare School

  • Changes in naval training
  • Training naval forces in the use of new weapons systems
  • Future training developments
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 TRAINING PARTNERSHIPS

  • The training agreement between the Royal Navy and Flagship
  • Creating cost effective training through integrated training solutions
  • Training solutions for maritime training
  • Developing new technology to improve training
  • Providing cost effective support
  • The benefits of training partnerships
  • John Brownbill

    John Brownbill, Marketing Director, Flagship Training

    Stephen Mackay

    Stephen Mackay, UK MOD Marketing Executive, Flagship Training

    16:20 CONTINUOUS DEVELOPMENT OF PERSONNEL

    Dr Greg Kennedy

    Dr Greg Kennedy, Senior Lecturer, Joint Services Command and Staff College, Kings College, London

  • Implementing e-learning
  • Key factors that must be included in e-learning programmes
  • Creating successful e-learning programmes
  • The benefits of e-learning for defence training
  • Lessons learned from implementing a successful e-learning programme
  • 17:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Russell Searle

    Russell Searle, Director, RJD Technology

    9:10 KEYNOTE ADDRESS

    Colonel Antal Ughy PhD

    Colonel Antal Ughy PhD, Chairman NATO Training Group Joint Service Sub-Group, Chief NATO Training Group Staff Element, NATO Training Group, OPS DIV, IMS, NATO HQ

  • The role of the NATO Training Group
  • Co-ordinating joint training to meet the needs of the coalition
  • Training lessons implemented from alliance operations
  • Future developments in joint training of NATO forces
  • 9:40 JOINT TRAINING PROGRAMMES

    Steven Arrowsmith

    Steven Arrowsmith, Senior Consultant, SCS

  • The benefits of live joint training
  • Developing realistic, effective exercises
  • Previous exercises developed by SCS
  • Implementing lessons learned from recent conflicts into future training exercises
  • 10:20 TRAINING FOR PEACEKEEPING OPERATIONS

    Colonel Wolfgang Krippl

    Colonel Wolfgang Krippl, Director, German UN Training Centre

  • Current requirements for peacekeeping training
  • What are the differences between regular training and training for peacekeeping operations?
  • Implementing lessons learned from previous experiences in Kosovo and Afghanistan
  • The UN training centre’s approach to training armed forces
  • Future developments in training for peacekeeping operations
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 PROVIDING REALISTIC COMBAT TRAINING

    Jan Vermeulen

    Jan Vermeulen, Programme Manager C3I Systems, Royal Netherlands Army Material Command

  • The need for and development of the MCTC
  • Providing realistic combined arms tactical training
  • Preparing units for high intensity conflicts and peacekeeping operations
  • Technology used in the MCTC to enhance realism in training scenarios
  • Future developments in training at the MCTC
  • 12:00 TRAINING AND SIMULATION

    Andy Fawkes

    Andy Fawkes, Deputy Director, UK Directorate of Analysis, Experimentation and Simulation, Ministry of Defence, UK

  • Advantages of using simulation technology in defence training
  • Current simulation programmes
  • Implications of Network Enabled Capacity
  • Interoperability and common components
  • Future trends for UK simulation programmes
  • 12:40 Networking Lunch

    14:00 THE GERMAN ARMY WARFIGHTING SIMULATION CENTRE

    Colonel Peter Schuetz

    Colonel Peter Schuetz, Commander, German Army Warfighting Simulation Centre

  • Mission and goals
  • Providing the CAX’es of major units with different simulation systems
  • Future challenges
  • Vision
  • 14:40 SIMULATING URBAN WARFARE

    Thomas C Lasch

    Thomas C Lasch, Chief, Models and Simulations Branch, Directorate of Simulations, Seventh Army Training Centre, US Army Europe

  • Baghdad in Germany
  • Simulation tools
  • Support personnel
  • Use as a service-wide training tool
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 PPP AND PFI DEFENCE TRAINING

    Jonathan Downing

    Jonathan Downing, PPP/PFI Partnering, Directorate for Broadening Smart Acquisition, Ministry of Defence, UK

  • The role of PPP and PFI in developing training programmes
  • Increasing PPP and PFI in defence training to deliver cost effective training programmes
  • Current PPP/PFI training programmes
  • The future of PPP and PFI in training
  • 16:20 COMMERCIAL DELIVERY OF MILITARY TRAINING

    Colonel Robin Clifford

    Colonel Robin Clifford, Head, International Defence Training (Army), British Army

  • Income generation vs defence diplomacy
  • Maintaining the UK’s reputation – protecting the MoD brand
  • Private military companies
  • Future lessons from existing commercial partnerships
  • 17:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

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