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In the current age, information dominates the road to battlefield supremacy. As a result, Defence organisations are improving the way they handle and exploit information.

The size of defence organisations like the MoD, NATO and DoD means that they will always consist of different generations of technology but there is a growing need for these systems to inter-operate. Utilising a wide range of complex systems of varying ages and enabling these systems to work together is a tremendous challenge and industry often struggles with similar issues.

Defence and government organisations are aiming to create secure, managed and adaptable information infrastructure to facilitate interoperable information exchange. This in turn will lead to improved decision-making and intelligence collection analysis, enabling cost effective use of Off-the-shelf wherever possible and improved operational capability.

Interoperable Information Exchange for Defence Operations 2004 will examine the UK, NATO and US’s interoperability agenda. Speakers, from MOD UK, DoD, the US Army, SHAPE, NATO, NATO C3 Agency, the Swedish National Defence College, and the Cabinet Office, will provide overviews of the most topical current and future programmes designed to promote interoperable information exchange and will tackle the issues of information assurance, life cycle management, and interoperability testing.

Benefits of Attending:
· ASSESS the latest developments, policies and capabilities in interoperable information exchange
· KEEP ABREAST of MoD programmes designed to tackle interoperability shortfalls
· HEAR DoD perspectives on future concepts for joint warfighting
· EXAMINE lessons learnt about linking weapons systems during Desert Shield/Desert Storm
· EXPLORE the opportunities for coalition interoperability
· INCREASE your awareness of the lifecycle, testing and security issues surrounding the interoperability question

Including valuable contributions from:

  • John Taylor, Director General Information, Ministry of Defence, UK
  • Air Commodore Julian Thomson, Director DII, Ministry of Defence, UK
  • Captain Hugh Cook USN, Deputy Director for JI&I, US Joint Forces Command
  • Captain (Ret’d) Alex Urrutia USN GS15, Deputy Director, Joint Battle Management Command and Control JBMC2, US Joint Forces Command
  • Lieutenant Colonel Anthony Burgin, Vice-Chair MIP Programme, Supreme Headquarters Allied Powers Europe
  • Lieutenant Commander James Darenkamp Jr, Joint Warfighter C4I Officer, Joint Interface Control Officer, Joint Interoperability Test Command (JITC), Defense Information Systems Agency, US Department of Defense
  • Major Rafael de Solis, SO C2 Requirements Section, Policy and Requirements Division, Supreme Headquarters Allied Powers Europe
  • Dr Michael Street, Senior Scientist, Architecture, Security and Interoperability Branch, CIS Division, NATO C3 Agency
  • Dr Frederick Moxley, Chief, Center for Joint & Coalition Interoperability, Interoperability Directorate, Defense Information Systems Agency, US Department of Defense
  • Charles Pizzutelli, Chief, Force XXI Office, Program Executive Office for Command, Control and Communications, Tactical (PEO C3T), US Army
  • Lars Nicander, Director, National Centre for IO/CIP Studies, Swedish National Defence College
  • John Borras, Assistant Director, Technical Policy, Office of the e-Envoy, Cabinet Offic

    SMi would like to welcome two new speakers to the programme:
  • Brigadier General Marc Rogers, USJFCOM
  • Dave Clarke, NATO C 3 Agency
  • Conference programme

    8:30 Registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Peter Varnish OBE

    Peter Varnish OBE, Director, International Geopolitical Solutions

    9:10 INTEROPERABILITY IN TODAY’S DEFENCE ENVIRONMENT

    John Taylor

    John Taylor, Director General Information, Ministry of Defence, UK

  • Effects of the UK 1998 Strategic Review
  • The UK Defence Interoperability Environment (DIE) specifications
  • Accomplishments to date
  • Major programmes - Network Integration Test and Experimentation (NITEworks) and the race to link weapon systems using electronic networks - Defence Information Infrastructure (DII)
  • 9:40 INFORMATION INFRASTRUCTURE IN TODAY’S DEFENCE ENVIRONMENT

    Air Commodore Julian Thomson

    Air Commodore Julian Thomson, Director DII, Ministry of Defence, UK

  • Overview of the DII project
  • Principle bidders
  • What are the governments targets? - the requirement for a single coherent information structure across the whole of defence - UK targets
  • Interoperability between the three armed forces
  • Achieving cost effectiveness through use of economy of scale
  • The scope of DII – information infrastructure in different service environments
  • 10:20 JOINT BATTLE MANAGEMENT COMMAND AND CONTROL

    Brigadier General Marc Rogers

    Brigadier General Marc Rogers, Director for Requirements and Integration (J8), US Joint Forces Command

  • Challenges to cohesive C2 capabilities
  • JBMC2 definition, scope and context
  • A new approach to organizing, training and equipping the force with JBMC2 capabilities
  • USJFCOM role in JBMC2 in support of DoD priorities
  • Programs, concepts and initiatives
  • JBMC2 roadmap
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 GOVERNMENT POLICIES FOR INTEROPERABILITY

    John Borras

    John Borras, Assistant Director, Technical Policy, Office of the e-Envoy, Cabinet Office

  • The government’s technical policies and specifications for achieving interoperability and information systems coherence across the public sector
  • Scope of e-GIF
  • Adherence to the e-GIF specifications and policies
  • Factors in the selection of e-GIF specifications
  • Use of XML and XSL as the core standards for data integration and management of presentational data
  • Management process
    Compliance issues
  • 12:00 US JOINT FORCES COMMAND INTEGRATION AND INTEROPERABILITY

    Dave Clarke

    Dave Clarke, Senior Scientist, Operations Research and Functional Services Division, NATO C3 Agency

  • Expanded role for joint integration and interoperability
  • Current interoperability challenges facing the US Armed Forces
  • DoD requirements and directives
  • Measures taken to improve interoperability
  • JBMC2
  • Improved strategic partnerships
  • Future concepts for joint warfighting
  • 12:40 Networking Lunch

    14:40 ACHIEVING INTEROPERABLE INFORMATION EXCHANGE IN NATO

    Robert Whittingham

    Robert Whittingham, Principal Technical Co-ordinator, HQ C3 NATO Staff

  • Importance of the ability to share information
  • Levels of integration and interoperability
  • Complexity of using interoperable systems in a coalition environment
  • Contingency case study
  • The unique requirements for a coalition environment
  • Key interoperability projects
    To what extent is NATO interoperability attainable?
  • 15:20 INTEROPERABLE RADIO

    John Shutler

    John Shutler, Chief Systems Engineer, ITT

  • Bowman project history, mission and vision
  • Bowman’s role in the UK Digitization of the Battlespace (Land) (DBL) initiative
  • US/UK JTRS interoperability demonstration programme (DSTL)
  • Bowman and SINCGARS interoperation
  • Opportunities for interoperability
  • 17:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Paul Casey

    Paul Casey, Senior Consultant, STASYS

    9:10 KNOWLEDGE SUPERIORITY

    Commodore (Ret’d) Patrick Tyrell OBE

    Commodore (Ret’d) Patrick Tyrell OBE, Director, Vale Atlantic Associates

  • Decisions, decisions, decisions
  • The role of the commercial sector in improving defence interoperability
  • Introducing a defence information infrastructure to link legacy systems
  • The XML challenge
  • The challenge of information assurance in interconnected defence environments
    Risks of using commercially available products
  • How do we reach interoperability solutions?
    “Knowledge Centric” Warfare
  • 9:40 INTEROPERABILITY TESTING

    Lieutenant Commander James Darenkamp Jr

    Lieutenant Commander James Darenkamp Jr, Joint Warfighter C4I Officer, Joint Interface Control Officer, Joint Interoperability Test Command (JITC), Defense Information Systems Agency, US Department of Defense

  • The certification process
  • Interoperability test process
  • Scope of interoperability evaluations
  • Testing in an operationally realistic environment – requirements
  • Scheduling and funding
  • Correction of interoperability deficiencies
  • 10:20 INFORMATION ASSURANCE AND INTEROPERABILITY

    Lars Nicander

    Lars Nicander, Director, National Centre for IO/CIP Studies, Swedish National Defence College

  • The vulnerable society
  • The threat of information warfare
  • Impacts of vulnerabilities and threats and the scale of the problem
  • Current and future studies
  • Challenges and the way ahead
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 LIFE CYCLE SUPPORT

    Steve Cottle

    Steve Cottle, Principal Consultant, STASYS

  • Acquisition of new capability
  • Understanding the system of systems
  • Demo of iSMART tools
  • iSMART in the US
  • Case study
  • 12:00 INTEROPERABILITY INITIATIVES

    Major General (Ret’d) Bill Robins

    Major General (Ret’d) Bill Robins, , BAE Systems

    12:40 Networking Lunch

    13:40 US ARMY’S C3 TACTICAL ARCHITECTURE

    Charles Pizzutelli

    Charles Pizzutelli, Chief, Force XXI Office, Program Executive Office for Command, Control and Communications, Tactical (PEO C3T), US Army

  • ABCS and supporting communications architecture/plans circa early 2002
  • C4I challenges of OIF
  • Response to those challenges
  • Incorporating lessons learned into a C4I architecture for the entire force
  • Associated initiatives aimed at enhancing jointness
  • Associated initiatives aimed at enhancing interoperability with our coalition partners
  • 14:20 TACTICAL DATA LINK INTEROPERABILITY

    Paul Casey

    Paul Casey, Senior Consultant, STASYS

  • Definition and scope of TDL
  • Warfare areas supported by TDL information
  • Why has TDL coherence been difficult to achieve? - process - infrastructure - cost
  • Military cost of failure to achieve coherence
  • 15:00 SEAMLESS SECURE COMMUNICATIONS

    Dr Michael Street

    Dr Michael Street, Senior Scientist, Architecture, Security and Interoperability Branch, CIS Division, NATO C3 Agency

  • Operational requirement for communications
  • Current limitations and deficiencies
  • Use of FNBDT to provide end to end secure communication services for NATO operations
  • Strategy for introduction and acceptance
  • Supporting bodies: the International Co-operation Working Group
  • Test and validation facilities for NATO and industry
    Secure interoperability efforts under the NATO C3 Board
  • 15:40 Afternoon Tea

    16:00 MULTILATERAL INTEROPERABILITY PROGRAMME (MIP)

  • Background to the programme
  • MIP vision, concept and goals
  • Organisation and membership
  • MIP specification - achieving common interface and exchange mechanisms
  • Test and evaluation
  • Lieutenant Colonel Anthony Burgin

    Lieutenant Colonel Anthony Burgin, Vice-Chair MIP Programme, Supreme Headquarters Allied Powers Europe

    Major Rafael de Solis

    Major Rafael de Solis, SO C2 Requirements Section, Policy and Requirements Division, Supreme Headquarters Allied Powers Europe

    16:40 CURRENT QINETIQ RESEARCH INTO INTER-NETWORK INTEROPERABILITY

    Phil Needham

    Phil Needham, Business Manager, Interoperability and Data Links, QinetiQ

  • JDN range extension – forwarding and translation options
  • JDN products to JPN users
  • Sensor networking
  • EXTENDOR/AJCN/JUEP
  • Future demonstrations – rapid threat update and sensor weapon system interoperability concepts
  • 17:20 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

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    Workshops

    Interoperable Information Exchange in Military Operations Workshop
    Workshop

    Interoperable Information Exchange in Military Operations Workshop

    The Hatton, at etc. venues
    11th February 2004
    London, United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    51/53 Hatton Garden
    London EC1N 8HN
    United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    HOTEL BOOKING FORM

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

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