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Lessons learned from Iraq will evidently change the way the Army and the Marine Corps develop, tailoring emerging policy and concepts to this new and evolving threat. With heavy armour making a surprise resurgence on the battlefield of Iraq, this has had a profound impact on policy makers. The future of land forces is still unclear due to the ongoing debate between the requirement for light or heavy forces.

Armour and Anti-Armour will address the importance of this current and evolving threat, concentrating on lessons learned from Iraq, identifying requirements and examining the challenges to capability. Developments, perspectives and approaches with respect to doctrine and equipment capability issues will be analysed in detail. It will look at international developments in combat vehicles, showing the developments in user requirements, that of mobility, protection, interoperability and firepower.

As defence budgets become ever more stretched the issue of affordability and balance of investment is emerging as a key issue of discussion, therefore this conference will present the most cost-effective means of armour and anti-armour development. The latest research and technology advances will be presented, demonstrating new focuses and reaction to capability downfall.

Armour and Anti-Armouraims to tackle the ongoing debate of combat vehicle development, focusing attention on the major international programmes, indicating the direction of future strategy and the believed role of armour and anti-armour in the future.

International case studies and perspectives from leaders in the field including...

  • Brigadier Bill Moore CBE, Director Equipment Capability, Ground Manoeuvre, Ministry of Defence, UK
  • Colonel Mike Beasock, Infantry System Manager, US Army TRADOC
  • Colonel David Swann MBE, Force Development, Headquarters Director, Royal Armoured Corps
  • Colonel Erich Lang, Chief Armoured Vehicles, Ministry of Defence, Germany
  • Lieutenant Colonel Duco Brongers, Commandant Combat Development Centre Ground Manoeuvre, Royal Netherlands Army
  • Lieutenant Colonel John Hinds, Project Manager, Unit of Action Special Programs, US Army
  • Lieutenant Colonel John Swift, PM Tank Systems, Marine Corps System Command, US Marine Corps
  • Major Alastair Oates, Directorate of Equipment Capability, Ground Manoeuvre, Ministry of Defence, UK
  • Major Vince Fagnan, Deputy Project Director, Mobile Gun Systems, Director Land Requirements 10-3, National Defence Headquarters, Canada
  • Michael Zoltoski, Deputy Director Weapons and Material Research Directorate, US Army Research Laboratory
  • Jacques Dubois, Defence Scientist, HEMi Project Manager, Defence Research & Development Canada, Valcartier

Benefits of Attending:

  • INCREASE your awareness of country-specific advances and experiences
  • GAIN invaluable insight into the status of current armour and anti-armour programmes
  • MAXIMISE your understanding of armour and anti-armour future requirements
  • EXPAND your knowledge of system developments
  • HEAR from key industry experts and develop key contacts through this focused networking forum

Conference programme

8:30 Registration & Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Richard Ogorkiewicz

Richard Ogorkiewicz, Visiting Professor, RMCS

9:10 KEYNOTE ADDRESS

Bill Moore

Bill Moore, Director Equipment Capability, Ground Manoeuvre, Ministry of Defence

  • The nature of future ops
  • The challenges to armoured vehicles in such operations
  • firepower
  • protection
  • mobility
  • The UK’s proposals to overcome such challenges
  • The impact of the doctrine of Rapid Effect on UK Armoured Vehicle design
  • 9:50 LESSONS IDENTIFIES FROM THE USE OF ARMOUR IN IRAQ

    David Swann

    David Swann, Force Development, Headquarters Director Royal Armoured Corps

  • Stock take on the war itself
  • Operations in 2004
  • Lessons identified
  • Considerations and implications for the future
  • 10:30 Morning Coffee

    11:00 US MARINE CORPS TANK SYSTEMS

    John Swift

    John Swift, PM Tank Stystems, Marine Corps Systems Command, Us Marine Corps

  • Tank organisation and distribution
  • Operation Iraqi Freedom I-III employment
  • Current tank programs and initiatives
  • Future armour capabilities and systems
  • 11:40 FUTURE RAPID EFFECTS SYSTEM (FRES)

    Alastair Oates

    Alastair Oates, Directorate of Equipment Capability(Ground Manoeuvre), Ministry of Defence

  • The FRES concept
  • Programme status
  • The assessment phase
  • Planning for the future
  • 12:20 Networking Lunch

    13:50 US - FCS

    John Hinds

    John Hinds, Product Manager FCS Special Programs, US Army

  • System overview and detailed description
  • Components & technology dependencies
  • Estimated performance and means of lethality and survivability
  • Schedule
  • 14:30 SWEDISH SEP PROGRAMME

    Peter Elmlund

    Peter Elmlund, Deputy Programme Manager SEP, Swedish Defence Materiel Administration (FMV)

  • Programme overview
  • The SEP concept
  • Meeting the demands for the future through modularity
  • Current status of the programme
  • Planned way ahead
  • 15:10 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 GERMANY

    Erich Lang

    Erich Lang, Chief, Armoured Vehicles, German Ministry of Defence

  • Capabilities requirements
  • BOXER programme
  • Infantry Fighting Vehicle PUMA
  • 16:20 NEW DEVELOPMENTS IN ARMOUR TECHNOLOGIES

    Marc Chassillan

    Marc Chassillan, Area Director, GIAT Industries

  • Protection against EFP and blast mines
  • The modular add-on armour protection of the VBCI
  • The citadel concept: a new structure for future AFV
  • 17:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Registration & Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Christopher Foss

    Christopher Foss, , Independent Artillery and Armour Consultant

    9:10 DEFENSIVE ARMOUR

    Edward Barshaw

    Edward Barshaw, Pulse Power for FCS STO Manager, US Army RDECOM-TARDEC

  • Integrated survivability
  • Active protection
  • Armour
  • Crew survivability reduction techniques
  • 9:50 THE DUTCH APPROACH

    Duco Brongers

    Duco Brongers, Commandant Combat Development Ground Manoeuvre, Royal Netherlands Army

  • Introduction combat development centre ground manoeuvre
  • Vision 2020 ‘The Dutch Approach’
  • From vision to acquisition
  • Capabilities for future combat vehicles
  • Capabilities for future anti-armour ground systems
  • 10:30 Morning Coffee

    11:00 PANEL DISCUSSION

    Mike Beasock

    Mike Beasock, TRADOC Systems Manager - CCMS, US Army Infantry School

    Jacques Dubois

    Jacques Dubois, Leader, Threat Warning Group, Defence R&D Canada Valcartier (DREV)

    Edward Barshaw

    Edward Barshaw, Pulse Power for FCS STO Manager, US Army RDECOM-TARDEC

    11:40 US ANTI-ARMOUR MISSILES

    Mike Beasock

    Mike Beasock, TRADOC Systems Manager - CCMS, US Army Infantry School

  • Threat Assessment
  • US Anti-Armour Missile Strategy
  • Current programmes in use
  • Kinetic energy programmes in development
  • Considerations for the future
  • 12:20 Networking Lunch

    13:50 CANADIAN MOBILE GUN SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS

    Vince Fagnan

    Vince Fagnan, Deputy Project Director Mobile Gun System/Director Land Requirements 10-3, National Defence Headquarters Canada

  • Canadian mobile gun system program
  • Canadian approach to survivability
  • Balancing essential requirements
  • Future requirements
  • 14:30 HIGH ENERGY MISSILE (HEMi) PROGRAM REVIEW

    Jacques Dubois

    Jacques Dubois, Leader, Threat Warning Group, Defence R&D Canada Valcartier (DREV)

  • HEMi Concept
  • Project Schedule
  • Review of technologies involved
  • Co-operation
  • Conclusion and future work
  • 15:10 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 SIKE FAMILY

    Moshe Cohen

    Moshe Cohen, Helicopter Systems Consultant, RAFAEL

  • Fire and forget and man-in-the-loop: 4th generation missile system
  • From anti-tank to multi-purpose missile
  • Retaining tactical unit independency
  • Command control and intelligence
  • 16:20 DEVELOPMENTS IN TANK AMMUNITION

    Boaz Carmi

    Boaz Carmi, Head of Armour Development Branch, R&D Department, Slavin - Land Systems Division, IMI

  • Kinetic energy ammunition
  • Multi-purpose ammunition
  • Smart munitions
  • Less lethal munitions
  • 17:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    +

    Workshops

    Survivability for Light and Medium Armoured Vehicles
    Workshop

    Survivability for Light and Medium Armoured Vehicles

    Park Street Training and Meeting Centre, at etc. venues
    2nd March 2005
    London, United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    51/53 Hatton Garden
    London EC1N 8HN
    United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    HOTEL BOOKING FORM

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

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    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

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