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EXTRA ADDITIONS - NEW SPECIAL ADDRESSES from....

THE HONORABLE PAUL McHALE, Assistant Secretary of Defense for Homeland Defense, US Department of Defense

and 

BRIGADIER GENERAL REDA AL BTOUSH, Director of Military Intelligence, Jordan Armed Forces

and

COLONEL YOSI SAGIV, Commanding Officer, Homeland Front Command, Jerusalem District,  Israeli Defence Forces

Following the recent tragedies in Russia, Jakarta and Madrid, and since 9/11, governments have greatly increased their homeland security funding. Clearly, countries must be able to prevent and deter attacks on their homeland as well as being able to detect impending danger before attacks occur. The emphasis on developing and strengthening homeland security strategy has never been greater.

This conference will identify and assess current and future threats, determining the potential impact on nations and assessing their vulnerabilities. This conference will also address border and transportation security, emergency preparedness and response, chemical, biological and nuclear counter-measures and infrastructure protection. Through country specific case studies, key lessons will be learned, showing best practice in homeland security strategy and policy.

A unique opportunity to learn from leading government and industry experts including:

  • The Honorable Paul McHale, Assistant Secretary of Defense for Homeland Defense, US Department of Defense
  • Rt Hon Bruce George, Chairman of the Defence Select Committee, House of Commons and President Emeritus, OSCE Parliamentary Assembly
  • HRH Prince Turki Al Faisal, Ambassador of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia to the United Kingdom, Royal Embassy of Saudi Arabia, London
  • Sir Emyr Jones Parry, United Kingdom Permanent Representative to the United Nations, United Kingdom Mission to the United Nations
  • Brigadier General Reda Al Btoush, Director of Military Intelligence, Jordan Armed Forces
  • Colonel Yosi Sagiv, Commanding Officer, Homeland Front Command, Jerusalem District, Israeli Defence Forces
  • Jean Michel Louboutin, Executive Director, Police Services, International Criminal Police Organisation – Interpol
  • Deputy Assistant Commissioner Peter Clarke CVO QPM, Metropolitan Police Service
  • Fredrick Thomas Martin, Consultant, Science and Technology Directorate, US Department of Homeland Security
  • Fernando Carvalho Rodrigues, Programme Director, Threats and Challenges Section, Public Diplomacy Division, NATO
  • Philip Robinson, Director, Regulatory Transactions, Financial Crime Sector Leader, Financial Services Authority
  • Dr Penny Bevan, Head, Emergency Preparedness, Department of Health, UK
  • Roger Cumming, Director, National Infrastructure Security Co-ordination Centre
  • Dr Rohan Gunaratna, Associate Professor, Institute of Defence and Strategic Studies, Singapore
  • Paul Ingram, Senior Analyst, British American Security Information Council (BASIC)
  • Peter Power FBCI FEPS FCMI FIRM, Managing Director, Visor Consultants

Conference programme

8:30 Registration & Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Bill Durodie

Bill Durodie, Director, International Centre for Security Analysis, King’s College London

9:10 A UK PERSPECTIVE ON HOMELAND SECURITY DEFENCE

Rt Hon Bruce George MP

Rt Hon Bruce George MP, Chairman of the Defence Select Committee, House Of Commons

  • Current threats to the UK
  • Developments in policy and doctrine to combat known threats
  • Lessons learned from recent international attacks
  • Budget constraints of homeland security defence projects
  • The importance of working with other government agencies and the private sector in order to secure the UK's homeland
  • Future plans and priorities of the Defence Select Committee
  • 9:50 HOMELAND DEFENSE: A MULTI-LATERAL MISSION

    Paul McHale

    Paul McHale, Assistant Secretary of Defense for Homeland Defense, Office of the Secretary of Defense

    10:30 Morning Coffee

    10:50 POST 9/11 TERRORIST THREAT FROM AL QAEDA AND ITS ASSOCIATED GROUPS

    Dr Rohan Gunaratna

    Dr Rohan Gunaratna, Head, International Centre for Political Violence and Terrorism Research, Institute of Defence and Strategic Studies, Singapore

  • The nature of terrorism pre 9/11
  • The impact of 9/11 on Al Qaeda
  • The changing role of Al Qaeda
  • How the nature of threat has developed in recent years
  • Predicting the unpredictable - the future of terrorism
  • 11:30 NATO’S PREVENTION OF AND RESPONSES TO SOCIAL DISRUPTION

    Professor Fernando Carvalho Rodrigues

    Professor Fernando Carvalho Rodrigues, Programme Director, Threats and Challenges Section, NATO Public Diplomacy Division

  • An overview of the role of NATO'S Threats & Challenges Section, in particular the Committee on the Challenges of Modern Society (CCMS)
  • The changing scope of the CCMS, what are its new aims and objectives?
  • Current policy issues that have arisen since the September 11th attacks and initiatives developed in response
  • Establishing what the new non-traditional threats to security are and what areas of society are particularly susceptible
  • The future role of NATO in combating threats to security
  • 12:10 A UNITED NATIONS PERSPECTIVE ON HOMELAND SECURITY

    Sir Emyr Jones Parry

    Sir Emyr Jones Parry, United Kingdom Permanent Representative to the United Nations, United Kingdom Mission to the United Nations

  • Current issues and developments within United Nations policy on homeland security
  • The current United Nations position on international homeland security
  • Working in conjunction with member states to ensure global security
  • Setting priorities
  • The revitalisation of the CTC
  • 12:50 Networking Lunch

    14:00 BIO SECURITY

    Dr Penny Bevan

    Dr Penny Bevan, Head of Emergency Preparedness, Department of Health

  • An overview of current projects in place
  • Co-ordinating a response to current threats
  • Problems and issues in establishing a resilient response
  • Future plans and initiatives
  • 14:40 REDUCING VULNERABILITY TO A CHEMICAL ATTACK

    Michael Powers

    Michael Powers, Senior Fellow, Chemical and Biological Arms Control Institute

  • How easy would it be to carry out a chemical attack?
  • Current threats and capabilities
  • Known agents and their potential impact
  • Measures in place to combat a chemical attack
  • An assessment of future chemical threats
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 THREAT OF A 'DIRTY BOMB' ON LONDON

  • Irrelevance of nuclear deterrence
  • Remember 'protect and survive'
  • Limitations of 'preparing for emergencies'
  • Importance of multilateral agreements and treaties
  • Sound intelligence and co-operative action are paramount
  • Nigel Chamberlain

    Nigel Chamberlain, Analyst and Press Officer , BASIC -British American Security Information Council

    Paul Ingram

    Paul Ingram, Senior Analyst, BASIC -British American Security Information Council

    16:20 TACKLING THE FINANCIAL ASPECTS OF TERRORISM

    Philip Robinson

    Philip Robinson, Director of Regulatory Transactions, Financial Crime Sector Leader, Financial Services Authority

  • Current threats to the financial sector
  • Investigating the financial information relating to terrorist activities
  • Regulating best practices in countering money laundering
  • What can the commercial sector do?
  • Future initiatives in the financial war against terrorism
  • 17:00 RESILIENT COMMUNICATIONS IN HOSTILE ENVIRONMENTS

    David Barrow

    David Barrow, Head of Business Development, Government and Civil Solutions, EADS Defence & Security SystemsLtd

  • UK’s communications Critical National Infrastructure: 85% is privately owned
  • Ensuring preparedness in the face of the new dimension of risk: the importance of secure, resilient communications independent of the public access infrastructure
  • The challenges presented by disruptive, unplanned events and emerging primary legislation: the model of complex transformation which has seen the defence sector move from platform centric operations to network centric operations
  • Illustrating the synergy of defence and pan-government environments
  • A model of civil contingencies: drawing upon experience of events including the Madrid bombings of 11 March 2004
  • The key question: how can we be confident of our readiness if we ca not imagine the event?
  • 17:40 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    Bill Durodie

    Bill Durodie, Director, International Centre for Security Analysis, King’s College London

    17:50 Networking Drinks Reception sponsored by EADS Defence and Security Systems

    8:30 Re-registration & Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Peter Power FBCI FEPS FCMI FIRM

    Peter Power FBCI FEPS FCMI FIRM, Managing Director, Visor Consultants Ltd

    9:20 KEYNOTE ADDRESS: HOMELAND SECURITY IN THE MIDDLE EAST

    HRH Prince Turki Al Faisal

    HRH Prince Turki Al Faisal, Ambassador of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia to the United Kingdom, Royal Embassy of Saudi Arabia London

  • Establishing the global stance
  • Recent progress in international co-operation
  • Working with the United States - the role of the joint task forces
  • Sharing 'real time' intelligence with international partners
  • What are the causes of threats to Saudi Arabia?
  • Current capabilities and future initiatives
  • 10:00 SPECIAL ADDRESS:

    Brigadier General Reda Al Btoush

    Brigadier General Reda Al Btoush, Director of Military Intelligence, Jordan Armed Forces

    10:40 Morning Coffee

    11:10 PREVENTING THE THREAT OF THE GLOBAL TERRORIST

    Jean Michel  Louboutin

    Jean Michel Louboutin, Executive Director Police Services, International Criminal Police Organisation -Interpol

  • How the role of Interpol has changed in recent years
  • Current threats and capabilities
  • The importance of sharing information with allied agencies
  • The practical possibilities of combating global terrorism
  • Future priorities and practices of Interpol
  • 11:50 COMBATING DOMESTIC TERRORISM

    Deputy Assistant Commissioner Peter Clarke CVO QPM

    Deputy Assistant Commissioner Peter Clarke CVO QPM, Counter-Terrorism, Metropolitan Police Service

  • Current intelligence issues within the UK
  • An assessment of the main threats to the UK
  • An overview of current counter terrorist capabilities
  • Recent initiatives and operations to combat domestic terrorism
  • Assessing future threats and future capabilities
  • 12:30 Networking Lunch

    14:00 SPECIAL ADDRESS

    Colonel Yosi Sagiv

    Colonel Yosi Sagiv, Commanding Officer, Israeli Defence Forces

  • New threats and societal security
  • Current priorities and key issues in Sweden
  • Responsibilities and funding
  • International co-operation strengthen the national capability
  • The role of the private sector in national crisis management
  • 14:40 THREAT VULNERABILITY AND THREAT ASSESSMENT INITIATIVES WITHIN THE DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY

    Fredrick Thomas Martin

    Fredrick Thomas Martin, Consultant, Science and Technology Directorate, US Department of Homeland Security

  • Background/role of US Intelligence in counterterrorism
  • Information sharing across the intelligence, law enforcement, and homeland security communities
  • Current threat vulnerability issues
  • New DHS effort: "Interagency Center for Applied Homeland Security Technology"
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:50 PANEL DISCUSSION

    Professor Fernando Carvalho Rodrigues

    Professor Fernando Carvalho Rodrigues, Programme Director, Threats and Challenges Section, NATO Public Diplomacy Division

    Fredrick Thomas Martin

    Fredrick Thomas Martin, Consultant, Science and Technology Directorate, US Department of Homeland Security

    Paul Ingram

    Paul Ingram, Senior Analyst, BASIC -British American Security Information Council

    16:30 CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION

    Roger Cumming

    Roger Cumming, Director, National Infrastructure Security Co-ordination Centre

  • The role of the NISCC in protecting the UK's critical infrastructure
  • Identifying vulnerabilities
  • The importance of co-operation between government and the private sector in protecting infrastructures
  • Opening dialogues with international partners
  • Priorities and practices within the NISCC
  • 17:10 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

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