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THE PREMIER HOMELAND SECURITY EVENT IN EUROPE IS BACK FOR A 4TH YEAR

Recent events in London, Bali, Egypt and New Orleans have focused the attention of Governments and the private sector on ensuring homeland defence, economic security and asset and infrastructure protection following disruptive events. Establishing and developing the appropriate preparedness and responsiveness to terrorist attacks, natural disasters and wide area crises has returned to the top of government and industry agendas.

When homeland defence fails, national emergency planning, response and business continuity management will determine the extent of the impact any disruptive event has upon national economy and public life. This year’s conference will look in detail at global defence policy and doctrine, identify current and emerging threats to homeland security and assess potential vulnerabilities at local, regional and national levels. Strategic and operational requirements for the Armed Forces, emergency services and private sector will be identified, providing a complete picture of priorities in today’s global security environment.

With a view to increasing inter-agency and cross sector communication and co-operation, Homeland Security and Resilience 2006 will present the crucial security objectives that defence and resilience planning must consider to ensure national cross sector capability, and provide innovative proposals as to how they may be achieved.

Bringing together high level international perspectives from defence, aviation, transportation, business and infrastructure, Homeland Security and Resilience 2006 will outline how national resources can be combined to provide increased emergency preparedness, responsiveness and security. Other key issues being discussed include the effect of future security legislation on civil liberties, critical infrastructure protection, geospatial intelligence, bio-defence, border security, cybersecurity and the impact of increased national spending for homeland defence. Emerging systems including intelligent sensors, biometric technologies and IED countermeasures will also be examined illustrating what resources are available to counter the threats posed by today’s unpredictable security environment.

Homeland Security and Resilience 2006 will feature a mixed programme of high level presentations from key industry figures and some interactive plenary sessions.

An exceptional international line up of speakers includes...

The exceptional speaker line-up includes…

  • Michael Fullerton, Head, Homeland Security Advisory Council (HSAC), US Department of Homeland Security
  • Bruce Mann, Head, Civil Contingencies Secretariat, Cabinet Office
  • HE Gehad Madi, Ambassador, Embassy of the Arab Republic of Egypt
  • Dr James A Tegnelia, Director, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), US Department of Defense
  • David Templeman, Director General, Emergency Management Australia, Australian Government
  • Assistant Commissioner Tarique Ghaffur CBE QPM, Head, Specialist Crime Directorate (SCD), Metropolitan Police
  • Deputy Chief Constable Andy Trotter QPM, British Transport Police
  • Rear Admiral Dan McNeil, CD, Commander Joint Task Force Atlantic, Canadian Forces
  • Sir Iqbal AKM Sacranie OBE, Secretary General, The Muslim Council of Great Britain
  • Ted C Whiteside, Head, Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) Centre, NATO
  • Colonel Edward Martin, Deputy Commander, Joint IED Defeat Task Force, US Department of Defense
  • Rt Hon Bruce George MP, House of Parliament, Former Chairman, Defence Select Committee and President, Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE)*
  • Brigadier General Terry Scherling, Deputy Director, Anti-Terrorism and Homeland Defense and Joint Director of Military Support, Directorate for Operations, Joint Staff, US Department of Defense
  • Peter Bradley CBE, Chief Executive, London Ambulance Service NHS Trust
  • Jim Williams, Program Director, US VISIT, US Department for Homeland Security
  • Dr Paul Stockton, Associate Provost and Director, Center for Homeland Security, Naval Postgraduate School, US Navy
  • Superintendent Steve Pearl, Head, National Extremism Tactical Co-ordination Unit (NETCU)
  • Lorraine Shepherd, Deputy Director, London Resilience Team

* Subject to Final Confirmation

Conference programme

8:30 Registration & Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Peter Power BA FIRM FCMI FEPS FBCI

Peter Power BA FIRM FCMI FEPS FBCI, Managing Director, Visor Consultants

9:10 ENSURING HOMELAND DEFENSE AT HOME AND ABROAD

Terry Scherling

Terry Scherling, Deputy Director, Anti-Terrorism and Homeland Defense and joint Director of Military Support, Directorate for Operations, Joint Staff, US Department of Defense

  • How the War on Terror has progressed and how has the Joint Staff adapted to this
  • The challenges in creating future Joint Staff policy and strategy for the new security environment and in conducting HS operations
  • Assisting local and regional and civil authorities - Military Aid to Civilian Authorities (MACA) operations
  • Supporting Homeland Defense operations at home and abroad – military requirements
  • Lessons learned and emerging security requirements - what technologies/platforms are being considered to meet these?
  • Challenges and opportunities for the defence industry
  • 9:50 HOMELAND SECURITY AND DEFENCE IN THE US: ANTICIPATING THE UNEXPECTED

  • The emerging roles of international communities – global co-operation and resource combination
  • The challenges in dividing resources to deal with multiple threats and disruptive events
  • How can we prepare to secure against the unexpected?
  • What compromises have to be considered in large-scale crises?
  • Lessons learned from Hurricane Katrina
  • Daniel  Ostergaard

    Daniel Ostergaard, Senior Advisor to the honorable Secretary Michael Chertoff and Executive Director, Homeland Security Advisory Council (HSAC), US Department of Homeland Security

    Michael Fullerton

    Michael Fullerton, Head, US Department of Homeland Security

    10:10 Morning Coffee

    11:10 CANADA COMMAND - THE CORNERSTONE OF CANADIAN FORCES TRANSFORMATION

    Richard Parsons

    Richard Parsons, , Canadian Forces

  • Canada’s International Policy Statement and Defence Policy Statement – Canada Command as a piece of the puzzle/answer
  • Defending the homeland – how Canada Command will enable this more effectively
  • A unified and integrated chain of command at the national and regional levels
  • A single operational theatre – how does this work and how can it be achieved?
  • What lessons have been learned that other militaries and governments must consider when transforming their defence capabilities to enable increased homeland security?
  • 11:40 DEVELOPMENTS IN AUSTRALIAN CONSEQUENCE MANAGEMENT IN THE AFTERMATH OF TERRORISM

    David Templeman

    David Templeman, Director General, Emergency Management Australia

  • Lessons learned - looking back and looking forward
  • The challenges in keeping public resilience, vigilance and security awareness in the years following an attack
  • Does a decay of public interest and remembrance occur?
  • Current and future measures to make more effective emergency management in the wake of terrorism and other disruptive events
  • Challenges for future consequence and emergency management
  • What do we need to plan for in the future?
  • 12:10 Networking Lunch

    14:00 COMBAT SUPPORT, TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT, THREAT CONTROL AND THREAT REDUCTION TO COUNTER WMD DESTRUCTION

    James  Tegnelia

    James Tegnelia , Director, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), Department of Defense, Defense Logistics Agency

  • Current and future threats (chemical, biological, nuclear, radiological or high-explosive)
  • Co-operation with the DoD agencies and governments (local and national) to increase capability and effectiveness
  • The challenges in threat deterrence and threat reduction
  • Future initiatives within DTRA
  • 14:30 NATO’S ROLE IN COUNTERING THE PROLIFERATION OF WEAPONS OF MASS DESTRUCTION (WMDs)

    Ted Whiteside

    Ted Whiteside, Head, Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) Centre , Nato H Q

  • What is the real threat of WMDs in the new environment of urban terrorism?
  • New initiatives launched to counter the proliferation of WMDs
  • Will NATO partners be involved in these initiatives and to what degree?
  • Working with international law enforcement agencies and governments to establish co-operative efforts
  • What is the role of military interoperability in improving CBRN defence capabilities?
  • Opportunities and challenges for the industry
  • 15:00 Afternoon Tea

    15:30 RESTRUCTURING NATIONAL SECURITY BUDGETS, POLICIES AND INSTITUTIONAL ARRANGEMENTS FOR HOMELAND SECURITY AND RESILIENCE

    Paul  Stockton

    Paul Stockton , Associate Provost and Director, Naval Postgraduate School

  • How has the US adapted to current threats?
  • Changes in US foreign policy that could affect international defence and security initiatives, policy and planning
  • Global security – patterns in terrorism, what lessons have been learned in the US that can be applied globally?
  • 16:00 THE WEAPON OF CHOICE FOR 21ST CENTURY TERRORISTS AND INSURGENTS

    Edward  Martin

    Edward Martin , Deputy Commander, Joint IED Defeat Task Force, US Department of Defense

  • How has national and international policy changed to accommodate the increasing threat?
  • The challenges in combating and preventing mobile and concealed terrorist threats/units using IEDs
  • From the battlefield to the city centre – why has this IED migration occurred?
  • Current and future mitigation strategies and technologies to counteracting IEDs
  • Educating and enabling the private sector – lessons learned from the recent conflicts/attacks
  • 16:30 HUMAN RIGHTS AND COMBATING TERRORISM: STRIKING THE BALANCE

    Timothy  Pitt-Payne

    Timothy Pitt-Payne, Barrister, 11 King's Bench Walk Chambers

  • Responding to 9/11: key legislation and court decisions
  • The impact of the London bombings 7/7 on government policy
  • The likely impact of the proposed changes on the military, police, private sector and public as a whole
  • The role of the courts
  • Emerging issues over the next 12 months
  • 17:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Registration & Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Bruce Aitken

    Bruce Aitken, President, Homeland Security Industries Association

    9:10 DEVELOPING SECURITY AWARENESS AND NATIONAL RESILIENCE STRATEGIES – CHALLENGES OVERCOME AND THOSE ON THE HORIZON

    Bruce Mann

    Bruce Mann, Head, Civil Contingencies Secretariat, Cabinet Office

  • Anticipate, assess, prevent, prepare, respond, and recover: the balance in the public and private sectors from 'Disaster 101' to detailed emergency planning
  • Implementing effective strategic control of complex crises and national resilience as a whole
  • Co-ordinating national responses to disruptive challenges - who makes what decision and when in a crisis and how would this be communicated?
  • In major incidents what resources are/should be in place
  • Understanding the CCA – what public bodies and the private sector must realise
  • 9:40 LONDON RESILIENCE

    Lorraine Shepherd

    Lorraine Shepherd, Deputy Director , London Resilience Team

  • London Resilience Partnership
  • Work-streams
  • Plans in place
  • Response to an incident
  • 10:10 Morning Coffee

    10:40 SPECIAL INCIDENT RESPONSE PANEL

  • Peter Bradley CBE, Chief Executive, London Ambulance Service NHS Trust
  • Rt Hon Bruce George, House of Parliament, Former Chairman, Defence Select Committee and President, Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE)*
  • Deputy Chief Constable Andy Trotter QPM, British Transport Police
  • Chaired by Peter Power BA FIRM FCMI FEPS FBCI, Managing Director, Visor Consultants
  • Peter Bradley

    Peter Bradley, Chief Executive , London Ambulance Service

    Deputy Chief Constable Andy Trotter

    Deputy Chief Constable Andy Trotter, , British Transport Police

    Rt Hon Bruce George MP

    Rt Hon Bruce George MP, Former Chairman, Defence Select Committee and President , Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE)*

    Bruce Aitken

    Bruce Aitken, President, Homeland Security Industries Association

    11:40 EGYPT’S PERSPECTIVE ON FIGHTING INTERNATIONAL TERRORISM

    Gehad Madi

    Gehad Madi, Ambassador, Embassy of The Arab Republic of Egypt

    12:10 Networking Lunch

    13:30 THE CHANGING SECURITY ENVIRONMENT AND ITS IMPACT ON THE MUSLIM COMMUNITY IN THE UK

    Daud Abdullah

    Daud Abdullah, Deputy Secretary General, Muslim Council of Great Britain

  • Cultural issues to be taken into consideration when establishing national policy and responses to security threats
  • How theological motivations and interpretations can go astray
  • Promoting not just security awareness but also resilience in communities
  • What are the responsibilities of the Muslim community (exposing radicalism) and the remaining UK population (exposing prejudice)
  • Religious and cultural co-operation = the way forward, together
  • 14:00 ORGANISED CRIME, MONEY LAUNDERING AND FINANCIAL CRIME – FIGHTING THE ‘INTELLIGENT AND INVISIBLE’ TERRORIST AND CRIMINAL

    Assistant Commissioner Tarique Ghaffur

    Assistant Commissioner Tarique Ghaffur, Head Specialist Crime Directorate (SCD), Metropolitan Police

  • The state of organised and financial crime in London and the UK
  • Current and future threats to the City and beyond
  • Working together - maximising information sharing among local communities, financial institutions, international law enforcement agencies and regulatory and financial communities
  • Emerging cost-effective and efficient policies, procedures and technologies to defeat organised and financial crime
  • Future Met Police initiatives – challenges to the private sector and security industry
  • 14:30 Afternoon Tea

    15:00 BUSINESS SECURITY AND IT INFRASTRUCTURE CHALLENGES IN LARGE SCALE BIOMETRIC SYSTEMS

    Simon Kenyon

    Simon Kenyon, Director of Solution Development, Daon

  • Security challenge - TWIC case study
  • Interoperability challenges - registered traveller case study
  • IT infrastructure issues
  • Successes in standards developments
  • What the future holds
  • 15:30 IMPLEMENTING EFFECTIVE BORDER CONTROL THROUGH ADVANCED BIOMETRIC TECHNOLOGY

    Jim Williams

    Jim Williams, Program Director, US VISIT, Department of Homeland Security

  • The challenges in ‘rolling out’ a national program (country co-operation, adequate personnel training, meeting the necessary equipment and infrastructure requirements for all air/land and sea ports)
  • Potential future applications of US VISIT and other biometric borders controls
  • Integrating US VISIT into other national security initiatives (program importance and interoperability issues)
  • Lessons learned so far
  • 16:00 FIGHTING EXTREMISM FROM WITHIN YOUR OWN BORDERS

    Steve Pearl

    Steve Pearl, Head, National Extremism Tactical Co-ordination Unit

  • Anticipating the unexpected (current and future targets/threats)
  • Learning from global examples of animal extremism – what are the trends
  • Intelligence gathering, surveillance and reconnaissance for effective tactical ops – creating the inescapable web
  • What the public and private sector should know – anti-animal extremism legislation, human rights
  • Initiatives and technologies being utilised to counter the threat of animal extremists – what does NETCU need from the public, the pharmaceutical and the security industry?
  • 16:30 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

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