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The 3rd event in SMi's Defence Training series - Simulation Training and Synthetic Environments 2006, will address the emerging trends within the international training environment and their impact on today’s battlefield. It will provide a forum for discussion on the long term direction of combat training.

Taking account of rapidly enhancing synthetic environment technologies and the move towards a digitised battlefield, this event will discuss issues such as policy and doctrine, programme requirements and updates, as well as the cutting edge capabilities of synthetic environments and simulation techniques for defence training.

Gain an insight from leading experts in the field including…

  • Brigadier Ola Gynas, Head, Swedish Defence Wargaming Centre
  • Brigadier Jan-Gunnar Isberg, Head, Swedish Core Planning Team VIKING -05, Swedish Defence Research Agency (F O I)
  • Andy Fawkes, Deputy Director, Defence Analysis, Experimentation and Simulation, Ministry of Defence, UK
  • Colonel James Shufelt, Director, TRADOC Proponent Integration Office, Virtual Training Environment, US Army Combined Arms Centre
  • Colonel Craig Langhauser, Project Manager, Combined Arms Tactical Trainers, Program Executive Office, Simulation Training and Instrumentation Command, US Army
  • Luciano Iorizzo, Deputy Commander, Army Training Support Centre, US Army
  • Lieutenant Colonel Scheibert, Chief, Section Training & Exercise Support, Army Warfighting Simulation Centre, German Army
  • Lieutenant Jan Svetoft, Chief of Staff, Swedish Core Planning Team VIKING –05, Swedish Defence Research Agency (F O I)
  • Major Tony Masys, Operational Modeling and Simulation Coordinator, Synthetic Environment Coordination Office, Canadian Department of National Defence
  • Major Daniel Ray, Modelling and Simulation Officer, Defense Analysis Modelling Information, ISR G2, US Army
  • Major Andrew Brown III, Operations and Simulations Officer, Training Analysis and Computer Support and Simulations, Joint Multinational Readiness Group, US Army
  • Dr Andrew Vallerand, Head of Future Forces Synthetic Environments, Defense Research & Development Canada
  • Jonathan Marshall, Operations Manager, Directorate of Analysis Experimentation and Simulation, Ministry of Defence, UK
  • Daniel Hoeh, Director, Training Analysis, Computer Support and Simulations, Joint Multinational Readiness Group, US Army

With Special Guest Chair...

  • Russell Searle, Director, RJD Technology

Benefits of Attending Simulation Training and Synthetic Environments include:

  • LEARN about the importance of international and joint training programmes from country specific perspectives
  • EXAMINE the challenges encountered and EVALUATE solutions available through the modernisation of military training
  • UNDERSTAND the importance of technological developments and the role of simulation for effective military training
  • REVIEW the latest technological developments for training systems in the tri-service arena
  • GAIN important insights from lessons learned in Iraq and recent cutting edge experimentation

Conference programme

8:30 Registration & Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Russell Searle

Russell Searle, Director, RJD Technology

9:10 UK PERSPECTIVE ON CURRENT AND FUTURE SIMULATION AND TRAINING REQUIREMENTS

Andy Fawkes

Andy Fawkes, Deputy Director, Defence Logistics Organisation, Ministry of Defence, UK

  • Trends and training requirements
  • Future training – changing simulation requirements
  • 9:50 U.S. ARMY TRAINING SUPPORT CENTER

    Luciano Iorizzo

    Luciano Iorizzo, Deputy Commander, Army Training Support Centre, US Army

  • Aims and objectives of the Army Training Support Center
  • Current training program - what they are and do they work?
  • Training initiatives and development of capabilities
  • Current and future developments
  • The way ahead
  • 10:30 Morning Coffee

    11:00 DEFENCE TRAINING INITIATIVES WITHIN CANADA

    Major Tony Masys

    Major Tony Masys, Operational Modeling and Simulation Coordinator, Synthetic Environment Coordination Office, Department of National Defence

    11:40 THE PORTRAYAL OF OOTW/PSO IN CONSTRUCTIVE SIMULATION MODELS

    Lieutenant Colonel Michael Scheibert

    Lieutenant Colonel Michael Scheibert, Chief, Section Training & Exercise Support, Warfighting Simulation Centre, German Army

  • Pre-requisites for the portrayal of OOTW/PSO in simulation models
  • The paradox between high level command echelon and the detailed representation of stabilisation operations
  • Performed software adaptations in GESI and KORA/OA and other desirable OOTW/PSO functionalities
  • The replacement of the classical MEL/MIL by sophisticated software features
  • Lessons learned and hints for the establishment of a suitable CAX organisation
  • 12:20 Networking Lunch

    13:50 DAES PERSPECTIVE ON TRAINING AND SIMULATION

    Jonathan Marshall

    Jonathan Marshall, Operations Manager, Directorate of Analysis Experimentation and Simulation, Ministry of Defence, UK

  • Aims and objectives of DAES
  • Development of capabilities
  • Priorities – what should we be focusing on?
  • Joint Collective Training Capability (JCTC)
  • Future of Joint Collective Training
  • 14:30 NEW DEVELOPMENTS IN SIMULATION IN CANADA

  • Challenges of powerful visualisation environments and digital simulations
  • M&S in support of Networked Enabled Capability
  • Current capabilities and limitations
  • Current state of technology of modelling and simulation
  • Roadmap for future simulation technologies
  • Dr Andrew Vallerand

    Dr Andrew Vallerand, Head of Future Forces Synthetic Environments, Defense Research and Development

    Stephane Albert

    Stephane Albert, Senior Manager, Business Development New Technologies, CAE

    Paul Hubbard

    Paul Hubbard, Defence Scientist, Department Of National Defence Canada

    15:10 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 SPECIAL PANEL DISCUSSION

    Brigadier Ola Gynas

    Brigadier Ola Gynas, Head, Swedish Defence Wargaming Center, Swedish Armed Forces

    Andy Fawkes

    Andy Fawkes, Deputy Director, Defence Logistics Organisation, Ministry of Defence, UK

    Colonel James Shufelt Jr

    Colonel James Shufelt Jr, Director, TRADOC Proponent Integration Office, Virtual Training Environment US Army Combined Arms Center

    Major Tony Masys

    Major Tony Masys, Operational Modeling and Simulation Coordinator, Synthetic Environment Coordination Office, Department of National Defence

    Rombout Karelse

    Rombout Karelse, , Royal Netherlands Army

    Lieutenant Colonel Michael Scheibert

    Lieutenant Colonel Michael Scheibert, Chief, Section Training & Exercise Support, Warfighting Simulation Centre, German Army

    17:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    Russell Searle

    Russell Searle, Director, RJD Technology

    8:30 Registration & Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Lieutenant General (Ret'd) Peter Vogler

    Lieutenant General (Ret'd) Peter Vogler, Independent Consultant, P V Consulting

    9:10 COMPUTER ASSISTED EXERCISES (CAX)

  • History
  • Theory of distributed exercises
  • Enhancing interoperability for Peace Support Operations, including civil-military co-operation, and to further develop the PSN (Peace Simulation Network) Concept
  • Benefits of civil-military co-operation
  • Benefits of training in a multitude of environments
  • Future plans – the way ahead
  • National command and control systems, game engine and game management system
  • Experience from Viking 05
  • Brigadier Ola Gynas

    Brigadier Ola Gynas, Head, Swedish Defence Wargaming Center, Swedish Armed Forces

    Brigadier Jan-Gunnar    Isberg

    Brigadier Jan-Gunnar Isberg, Head, Swedish Core Planning Team VIKING -05, Swedish Defence Research Agency (F O I)

    Lieutenant Jan   Svetoft

    Lieutenant Jan Svetoft, Chief of Staff, Swedish Core Planning Team VIKING –05, Swedish Defence Research Agency (F O I)

    10:10 US ARMY VIRTUAL TRAINING SUPPORT

    Colonel James Shufelt Jr

    Colonel James Shufelt Jr, Director, TRADOC Proponent Integration Office, Virtual Training Environment US Army Combined Arms Center

  • Aims and objectives – what has changed?
  • Key initiatives underway - what they are and do they work?
  • Training and development of technological capabilities
  • Lessons learned from operational experiences
  • The way ahead
  • 10:50 Morning Coffee

    11:10 INTEROPERABILITY AND INTEGRATION

    Colonel Craig Langhauser

    Colonel Craig Langhauser, Project Manager, Combined Arms Tactical Trainers, Program Executive Office, Simulation Training and Instrumentation Command , US Army

  • Synthetic Environment - Core (SE Core)
  • Common Gunnery Architecture (CGA)
  • 11:50 VIRTUAL REALITY AND SIMULATION

    Jan Van Geest

    Jan Van Geest, , TNO Defence, Security and Safety

    12:30 Networking Lunch

    13:50 SIMULATIONS SUPPORTING LIVE TRAINING AT THE JOINT MULTINATIONAL READINESS GROUP

  • Friendly and Enemy Activity in Non Contiguous Battle Space
  • Virtual UAV
  • Data Collection
  • Use in Deployed Training
  • Daniel Hoeh

    Daniel Hoeh, Director, Training Analysis, Computer Support and Simulations, Joint Multinational Readiness Group, US Army

    Major Andrew Brown III

    Major Andrew Brown III, Operations and Simulations Officer, Training Analysis, Computer Support and Simulations, Joint Multinational Readiness Group, US Army

    15:30 USING GAME TECHNOLOGY FOR ES2 SIMULATION TRAINING

    Major Daniel Ray

    Major Daniel Ray, Modeling and Simulation Officer, Defense Analysis Modelling Information, ODCS G2, US Army

  • Why use simulation for ES2 training?
  • Resources – role players
  • Meeting current and immediate requirements to fully implement ES2 now?
  • Commercial Game Technology with Potential for Training
  • First Person Shooter (FPS)
  • Multi Player on Line Games (MPOG)
  • Role Playing Game (RPG)
  • Lessons learned
  • 15:40 NEW TECHNOLOGY FOR MULTI-LEVEL BEHAVIOUR SIMULATIONS

    Dr Emmanuel Chiva

    Dr Emmanuel Chiva, Vice-President, MASA - SCI

  • Human behaviour modeling – the new challenge in simulation technology
  • Changes in Synthetic Environments, virtual terrain’s, physical engines and virtual realities – new and emerging methods
  • Problems and challenges faced
  • Integrating the human dimensions; two case studies
  • 16:20 Chairman's Closing Remanrsk and Close of Conference

    Lieutenant General (Ret'd) Peter Vogler

    Lieutenant General (Ret'd) Peter Vogler, Independent Consultant, P V Consulting

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

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