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Over the years, there has been significant progress in establishing combat survivability to what we know today as a high-priority requirement for all our combat aircraft. Investments in advanced research applications have paid significant dividends to the warfighter in terms of technological solutions, which increased combat effectiveness and saved lives. The focus of this conference will be to examine the modernisation of aerospace survivability, examining susceptibility reduction and low vulnerability technologies, as well as associated cost and performance improvements. It will discuss the required role of both manned and unmanned aircraft in modern warfare and the related survivability requirements. Experience gathered from recent combat operations will be reviewed, addressing force readiness and capability shortfalls, force transition issues, and longer-term requirements that could arise from potential adversaries’ exploitation of new technologies and operational concepts. This will be forum, which will unveil the most cost effective, and efficient means of combating the survivability challenge, offering practical knowledge on the development of mission ready military aircraft.

Benefits of Attending:

  • Offer an informed insight into the modernisation of aerospace survivability
  • Address force readiness and capability short falls
  • Examine short term and long term requirements for aircraft survivability
  • Review susceptibility and low vulnerability technologies
  • Offer practical knowledge on the development of military aircraft
  • Discover the most cost-effective means of combating survivability

    Aircraft Survivability is currently in production and the full programme will be available shortly. To receive the full programme please select ‘more information’ and this will be sent to you as soon as it is completed. Delegate Bookings are being taken NOW so register your attendance TODAY to guarantee your place at this important event.

    Programme highlights:

  • ASSESS current and future force requirements for aircraft survivability in modern warfare
  • IDENTIFY the key advancements in both vulnerability and susceptibility reduction
  • DISCOVER how to combat enemy exploitation of new developing technologies
  • MAXIMISE survivability through learning the latest techniques in vulnerability assessment
  • NETWORK with key decision-makers and industry experts in a globally attended forum


  • A unique opportunity to learn from military, government & research experts including:

  • Colonel John Greenhalgh DFC, Force Development, HQ Director Army Aviation
  • Colonel Michael B Leahy Jr., Materiel Group Director, Air Vehicles, Air Force Research Laboratory
  • Squadron Leader Philip Wilkinson, Forward Support (Fixed Wing) Design, Defence Logistics Organisation, Ministry of Defence, UK
  • Captain Dwight Cousins, Program Manager, Advanced Tactical Aircraft Protection, Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR)
  • Donna Egner, Deputy Director, Survivability/Vulnerability Information Analysis Center (SURVIAC)
  • Joseph Zarzycki, Technical Director, Edgewood Chemical & Biological Center, RDECOM
  • John McKeown, Technical Director, Joint Strike Fighter Program, US Air Force
  • Dr Robert "Bob" W Gedridge Jr., Senior Survivability Engineer, Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR)
  • James "Jim" C Young, Senior Survivability Engineer, Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR)
  • Natalie Crawford, Vice President and Director, Project Air Force, The Rand Corporation
  • Craig Deyerle, Missile Warning Staff Engineer, MacAulay-Brown
  • Captain Scott Rothermel, Flight Commander, US Air Force
  • Matt Kolleck, Senior Associate, Booz Allen Hamilton
  • Conference programme

    8:30 Registration & Coffee

    9:00 Chairperson's Opening Remarks

    Natalie W Crawford

    Natalie W Crawford, Vice President and Director, Project Air Force, The Rand Corporation

    9:10 ENHANCING SUSTAINMENT CAPABILITIES FOR THE FUTURE

    Colonel Michael B Leahy Jr.

    Colonel Michael B Leahy Jr., Material Group Director, Air Vehicles, Air Force Research Laboratory

  • New processes and new procedures
  • New analytical modeling capabilities
  • New repair technologies
  • New structural concepts
  • Flow control devices for suppression of acoustic effects
  • 9:40 WAH 64

    Colonel John Greenhalgh DFC

    Colonel John Greenhalgh DFC, , Force Development, , HQ Director Army Aviation

  • HIDAS
  • Beyond HIDAS
  • The threat
  • Survivability features
  • Doctrine and tactics
  • 10:20 SURVIAC

    Matt Kolleck

    Matt Kolleck, Senior Associate, Booz Allen Hamilton

  • Information resource
  • Modeling resource
  • Services
  • Products
  • Technical area tasks
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 SURVIVABILITY SYSTEM FOR ROTORCRAFTS

    Moshe Goldbaum

    Moshe Goldbaum, Director, Marketing & Business Development, RAFAEL

  • Background
  • Concept of solution
  • Operational method
  • Feasibility tests
  • Conclusions
  • 12:00 UNITED STATES NAVY AND UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS (USN/USMC)

    James C Young

    James C Young, Senior Survivability Engineer, Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR)

  • NAVAIR systems vulnerability overview
  • Critical components and kill modes
  • Vulnerability assessments
  • Vulnerability reduction design
  • Navy R&D programs
  • Navy vulnerability test facilities
  • 12:40 Networking Lunch

    14:00 COMBAT DAMAGE REPAIR CAPABILITY

    Squadron Leader Philip Wilkinson

    Squadron Leader Philip Wilkinson, Forward Support (Fixed Wing) Design, Defence Logistics Organisation, Ministry of Defence, UK

  • The reality of aircraft battle damage
  • Aircraft damage assessment criteria
  • Traditional approach to aircraft battle damage repair
  • Expedient repair
  • Future expedient repair opportunities and challenges
  • 14:40 REDUCING CHEMICAL, BIOLOGICAL AND RADIOLOGICAL VULNERABILITY

    Dr Mark Brickhouse

    Dr Mark Brickhouse, Director, Edgewood Chemical & Biological Center, RDECOM

  • Threat characteristics
  • Survivability requirements
  • Approach to conducting a vulnerability assessment
  • Air vehicle system definition
  • Reducing CBR vulnerability through design
  • Recommendations
  • 15:20 GRIPEN EW

    Petter Bedoire

    Petter Bedoire, Director, EW Systems, Electronic Warfare Systems Division, Saab Tech

  • Operational capabilities:
  • original capability requirements
  • enhanced survivability in peace-keeping and peace-enforcement scenarios
  • from self-protection to electronic attack
  • Solutions on Gripen:
  • self-protection against MANPADS
  • self-protection against radar-guided missiles
  • situation awareness and tactical support
  • enhancements for electronic attack
  • Solutions for other platforms
  • RWE Tornado in Germany
  • MoDAS for TORNADO in UK
  • BOL and BOZ-ED
  • 16:00 Chairperson’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-registration & Coffee

    9:00 Chairperson's Opening Remarks

    Natalie W Crawford

    Natalie W Crawford, Vice President and Director, Project Air Force, The Rand Corporation

    9:10 UNITED STATES NAVY AND UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS (USN/USMC)

    Dr Robert W Gedridge Jr

    Dr Robert W Gedridge Jr, Senior Survivability Engineer, , Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR

  • NAVAIR systems susceptibility overview
  • Susceptibility reduction technology trends
  • Balanced susceptibility reduction approach
  • Susceptibility/survivability Modeling & Simulation (M&S) Verification, Validation & Accreditation (VV&A)
  • Multi-use survivability materials
  • 9:40 NAVY TACTICAL AIRCRAFT EW

    Captain Dwight Cousins

    Captain Dwight Cousins, , Program Manager, Advanced Tactical Aircraft Protection, Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR)

    10:20 DIRECTIONAL INFRARED COUNTERMEASURES

  • Basic system operation
  • Test objectives and methodology
  • Hardware in the loop testing
  • Live fire testing
  • Installed system testing
  • Correlation of results
  • Craig Deyerle

    Craig Deyerle, Missile Warning Staff Engineer, MacAulay-Brown

    Captain Scott Rothermel

    Captain Scott Rothermel, Flight Commander, US Air Force

    11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 PLATFORM PROTECTION

    Paul Goddard

    Paul Goddard, Sales and Marketing Manager, Business Director

  • The threat
  • The challenge of two colour seekers
  • Strategies for defeating two colour seekers
  • Modelling and simulation
  • Testing of IRCMs and IRCM solutions
  • Future dispenser and IRCM requirements
  • 12:00 AIRCRAFT SURVIVABILITY/VULNERABILITY SIMULATION

  • Encounter situation
  • Signature
  • Threat modelling
  • Target modelling
  • Duel simulation
  • Vulnerability simulation
  • Heinrich Dorsch

    Heinrich Dorsch, Head of Department, IABG

    Heinrich Dorsch

    Heinrich Dorsch, Head of Department, IABG

    Heinrich Dorsch

    Heinrich Dorsch, Head of Department, IABG

    12:40 Networking Lunch

    14:00 OPERATIONAL TRAINING

    Roger Hannaford

    Roger Hannaford, Business Development Europe, DRS Training and Control Systems

  • The need for realistic operational training
  • Modern air combat manoeuvring instrumentation
  • EW training
  • Interactive debrief systems
  • 14:40 THE USE OF DESIGN OF EXPERIMENTS (DOE) METHODOLOGY

    Matt Kolleck

    Matt Kolleck, Senior Associate, Booz Allen Hamilton

  • Testing can become very expensive and time consuming
  • DOE methodology can help generate a more cost- effective test program
  • Some success stories
  • Can DOE work in a modelling and simulation world?
  • Proof-of-concept study looking at aircraft survivability features was performed
  • What is the return on investment for survivability enhancement features?
  • DOE was shown to provide an excellent methodology for addressing this question
  • 15:20 SURVIVABILITY ASSESSMENTS

  • Vulnerability assessment overview
  • Target modelling
  • Weapon/target interaction
  • Kill assessment
  • The INTAVEL air target vulnerability assessment model
  • Survivability optimisation
  • Tri-service vulnerability assessments
  • Dr Ian Collinge

    Dr Ian Collinge, Head of Terminal Effectiveness, INSYS

    Dan Richardson

    Dan Richardson, Business Acquisition Manager - Modelling and Simulation, INSYS

    16:00 Chairperson’s Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

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