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Following on from the success of last year’s Night Vision conference we are once again bringing together the international specialists within the night vision field and tackling the issues that matter. Building on the success of last year’s event, the aim of this year conference is to bring together leading defence officials and industry experts in night vision technologies. The event will look at the use of night vision technologies, considering the operational issues and the UK, European and international requirements. It will also cover the increasing usage of night vision technologies in modern battlefield situations.

As a senior industry executive, you will be aware of the importance and potential of this field. We would therefore like to invite you to register for Night Vision 2000, as organised by SMi conferences.

Leading military and industry speakers will include:
Colonel Thomas Kelly, Program Manager Night Vision, Reconnaissance and Target Acquisition, US Army
John Martin, Night Vision Devices IPT Leader, Air Force Research Laboratory (Contractor Team)
Stig Enander, Senior Marketing Manager, Optronics Division, CelsiusTech Electronics (Sweden)
Gert Nutzel, Research and Development Director, Delft Electronic Products (Netherlands)

With approximately 100 attendees including exhibitors and sponsors networking at SMi’s successful Night Vision 99 conference, our second annual event to be held in London is scheduled to take place on the 6th and 7th March 2000 and is set to be even more promising. Once again in conjunction with this conference we are organising an exhibition. This will give a further opportunity to meet, network and view the products of many of the key industry organisations.

Please register now using the registration form overleaf to guarantee your place at this important conference.

Conference programme

8:30 Registration and Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Lt. Cdr Barrie O’Sullivan

Lt. Cdr Barrie O’Sullivan, CDO AVN TD, Maritime Warfare Centre, Royal Navy

9:10 KEYNOTE ADDRESS

Dr John Pellegrino

Dr John Pellegrino, Director Sensors and Electron Devices Directorate, Army Research Laboratory

  • Needed night vision capability - Current night vision technology
  • Night vision concepts and technologies for future systems
  • Multidomain smart sensors - Uncooled sensors
  • Integrated sensor concepts - Infrared and electro-optics
  • Acoustics / seismic - Millimetre wave
  • Fusion and aided / automatic targeted recognition
  • 9:40 NIGHT VISION REQUIREMENTS IN THE US MARINE CORPS

    Major Ken Gaskill

    Major Ken Gaskill, Armour, Night Vision and Directed Energy Requirements Officer, US Marine Corps

  • The Marine Corps need of night vision systems
  • The current status of night vision equipment in the Marine Corps
  • In the light of budgetary constraints future requirements including virtual reality, simulators and the use of night vision technologies in field training
  • The need for effective simulation and training systems to enable accurate mission planning prior to operations
  • System selection criteria including weight and cost considerations
  • Summary - Supplying the Marine with the best night vision systems that will enable them to gain significant night time advantage
  • 10:20 NIGHT VISION GOGGLES TRAINING

    Squadron Ldr (Ret’d) Douglas Vine

    Squadron Ldr (Ret’d) Douglas Vine, Night Vision Training Specialist Centre for Aviation Medicine, Royal Air Force

  • An overview of the work completed by the RAF Centre of Aviation Medicine
  • A description of the night vision equipment currently used by the Royal Air Force
  • In the light of budgetary constraints the increasing use of simulators rather than live training
  • How real does a simulation have to be: An analysis of the degree of realism required in order for the simulation to be effective
  • Human factors
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee and Exhibition

    11:30 HUMAN FACTORS AND NIGHT VISION

    Dr Frank Kooi

    Dr Frank Kooi, Senior Scientist, Displays, TNO Human Factors Research Institute (Netherlands)

  • An review of the human interface with night vision technologies
  • What an operator wants and needs to know: near, intermediate and in the future
  • Evaluating laser countermeasures, including laser eye protection and night vision goggles
  • The importance of preventing fatigue as a result of extensive use of night vision goggles
  • Using night vision technologies to combat the laser threat
  • How night vision technologies can protect from the laser threat
  • 12:10 IMAGE FUSION

    Dr Graham Rood

    Dr Graham Rood, AD /Man Machine Integration, DERA

  • The need for fusion of image intensified and thermal images to aid NoE operations
  • Project overview - data gathering, adaptive fusion methodology, quantitative performance assessment, pilot assessment
  • Candidate fusion methods and architectures
  • Development of image fusion metrics - measure of effectiveness
  • Results to date
  • Future development and trials plans
  • 12:50 Lunch and Exhibition

    14:00 IS THERE A WYSIWYG MODE FOR IMAGE INTENSIFIER SPECIFICATIONS?

    Gert Nutzel

    Gert Nutzel, Director of Research and Development, Delft Electronic Products

  • Image quality of I/2 devices.
  • The usefulness of specifications.
  • Would a European standard be useful ?
  • How can users benefit most from new I/2 developments ?
  • DEP’s XD-4™ tubes
  • Future developments
  • 14:40 INTEGRATION OF THERMAL IMAGING (TI) IN SIGHTING SYSTEMS

    Stig Enander

    Stig Enander, Senior Marketing Manager, Optronics Division, CelsiusTech Electronics

  • Overview of current thermal imaging systems available
  • Deploying TI technology in the battlefield environment
  • Integrating TI into current technologies
  • The systems available for the military user
  • The benefits of using TI technology
  • Future developments
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea and Exhibition

    15:50 INCREASING THE OPERATIONAL ADAPTABILITY OF HELICOPTER NIGHT VISION

    Gerry Fabian

    Gerry Fabian, Business Development Manager, Pilkington Optronics

  • How night vision compatible cockpit lighting can assist in non night vision operations
  • Using NVG-friendly navigation technology for covert operations
  • Customising night vision installation for rotary wing aircraft
  • Installing night vision technology for search and rescue, ASW and surveillance
  • The importance of an effective design and manufacturing process
  • How the Swedish Defense Force are using night vision technology on their rotary wing aircraft
  • 16:30 NIGHT VISION AND TV IMAGING

    Tony Cochrane

    Tony Cochrane, Business Manager, Defence Group, EEV

  • A review of current low light TV solutions
  • A description of the new EEV CCD technology
  • Signal to Noise, MTF and Resolution issues
  • A summary of other performance criteria
  • Light control
  • Future developments
  • 17:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    17:15 Drinks reception and exhibition

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Major Micky Barnes

    Major Micky Barnes, Operational Requirements 54(B), (Air), Ministry of Defence

    9:10 NIGHT VISION DEVICES

    Colonel Thomas Kelly

    Colonel Thomas Kelly, Program Manager Night Vision, Reconnaissance and Target Acquisition, US Army

  • An overview of the program from 1996 to present day
  • Deficiencies in current:
  • Image intensifiers - Thermal systems - Laser systems
  • System integration of multi sensor suites
  • Difficulties in integrating eye safe laser range finders, target location observation system and driver vision enhancer
  • Future developments enabling an integration between LLDR and EMD models
  • 9:40 SIGNAL PROCESSING OF FLIR IMAGERY FOR SENSOR SIMPLIFICATION AND IMPROVED OPERATOR PERFORMANCE

    Brian Johnson

    Brian Johnson, Business Development Manager, Marconi SPS Systems

  • The need for enhanced signal processing
  • Local area processing and histogram techniques for enhanced eye / display interface
  • The capabilities and benefits of electronic zoom, stabilisation and image derotation
  • Overview of scene based non-uniformity techniques
  • 10:20 NEW INNOVATIONS IN INFRARED IMAGING SYSTEMS

    Andrew Phillips

    Andrew Phillips, Director, Airborne, FLIR Systems

  • Overview of IR technologies
  • Situations where IR technology can be deployed effectively
  • Using IR imaging systems to improve target detection
  • Using commercial off the shelf (COTS) technology for militarised airborne systems
  • Incorporating payloads into imaging system to ensure maximum mission versatility
  • Integrated logistic support
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee and Exhibition

    11:30 NIGHT VISION IMAGING SYSTEMS (NVIS) AND COCKPIT LIGHTING

    John Martin

    John Martin, Night Vision Devices IPT Lead, Air Force Research Laboratory (Contractor Team)

  • The widespread use of night vision goggles (NVGs) to facilitate night flight operations
  • How the increased use of NVGs has driven a parallel increased requirement for NVIS compatible lighting
  • The methods available for implementing NVIS compatible lighting
  • How can NVIS compatible lighting be effective and affordable?
  • 12:10 NIGHT VISION / ELECTRO OPTICS SENSORS

    JHN van Ameyden

    JHN van Ameyden, General Manager / Business Development, Signaal AB (Sweden)

  • Overview of night vision \ electro-optic technologies
  • The importance of engineering, logistics, test and training for all NV/EO technologies
  • The function NV/EO sensors perform in the visual detection, identification and verification in non perfect littoral environments
  • Case study operations when battles have been won at night including examples from Bosnia and the Gulf War
  • The importance of affordability in times of reducing budgets and downsizing
  • The future for night vision technologies in the light of existing and emerging threats
  • 12:50 Lunch and Exhibition

    14:00 MICRO ICCD

    Patricia Tomkins

    Patricia Tomkins, Managing Director, Photonic Science

  • Overview of CCD camera capabilities
  • Designing for helmet mounted and remote pilotless vehicles in mind
  • Using Micro ICCD for 24 hour day/night operations
  • The pre-space (zero G) qualifications required for satellite and space use
  • Using Micro ICCD for covert surveillance operations
  • Future uses for CCD technologies
  • 14:40 NIGHT VISION FOR SECURITY SYSTEMS

    Dusan Zadravec

    Dusan Zadravec, Business Development Manager, Leica Geosystems

  • Using night vision technology for ground support for helicopters
  • Integrating night vision technology into air traffic control systems
  • How night vision systems can assist in night time parachute training
  • The systems available for the military user
  • The benefits of using night vision technology for night tracking and surveillance
  • Future developments
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea and Exhibition

    15:50 CONCEPTS AND DESIGN OF ADVANCED THERMAL IMAGER SYSTEMS’

    Dr. Gabby Sarusi

    Dr. Gabby Sarusi, Product Line Manager, Night Vision Operations, ELOP

  • An overview of the current systems utilised
  • Selection criteria used to develop night vision equipment
  • The need for night vision technologies to be integrated within existing platforms in order to enable effective night time operations
  • The future of night vision equipment and future schedules for the development of new systems
  • 16:30 DEVELOPMENT OF AFFORDABLE HELMET MOUNTED DISPLAYS (HMD’S) IN THE AIRBORNE AND COMBAT VEHICLE ENVIRONMENT

    Paul Love

    Paul Love, Director of Business Development, QWIP Technologies

  • Issue driving requirements
  • Impediments to user acceptance and acquisition
  • Developing an operation based approach to fielding HMD’s
  • Current development activities
  • 17:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

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    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

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