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I am delighted to invite you to attend SMi’s Enhanced Vision conference. As a follow up to our highly successful Night Vision 2000 event, this conference will explore the main issues within this dynamic sphere of the defence industry.

SMi has assembled top military and industry experts to address the critical issues in this increasingly important area of military operations.

Conference programme

8:30 Registration and Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Wayne Gagner

Wayne Gagner, Chief Executive, S and W Associates

9:10 A VISION OF A NEW CENTURY - OR A VEIL OF OLD PROBLEMS

Roy Thompson

Roy Thompson, Projects Manager, Applied Imaging Group

  • The early use of telescopes and binoculars
  • Elevating the viewpoint. From the crows-nest, into space
  • Night vision - still the biggest problem
  • Let there be lights - of all kinds
  • Away from the visible spectrum
  • A taste of things to come
  • 9:40 U.S. MARINE CORPS

    Major Skip Gaskill

    Major Skip Gaskill, Armor/Anti-Armor and Night Vision Requirements Officer, U.S. Marine Corps

  • USMC need for night vision requirements
  • Current status of night vision equipment
  • Training and simulations requirements
  • Budgetary constraints
  • Systems selection criteria
  • 10:20 THE URBAN BATTLEFIELD AND ENHANCED VISION

    Lieutenant Colonel Koos Meijer

    Lieutenant Colonel Koos Meijer, Program Leader Soldier Modernisation Programme, Royal Netherlands Army

  • The FIBUA doctrine of the Royal Netherlands Army
  • The dangers and preparation of the urban battlefield
  • The place of the Soldier Modernisation Programme
  • The development and advances in the Netherlands
  • Capabilities of the current vision equipment
  • Future requirements and plans for the Royal Netherlands Army
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 THE URBAN BATTLEFIELD AND ENHANCED VISION

    Captain Martin Smith

    Captain Martin Smith, SO3 RA Urban Operations Wing, British Army

    12:00 THERMAL WEAPON SIGHTS

    Dave Evans and Martin Adams

    Dave Evans and Martin Adams, Project Manager and Business Group Manager, THALES Optics

  • Optimum technologies for thermal weapon sights
  • Designing and packaging for the dismounted close combat environment
  • Man machine interface issues
  • The practicalities of meeting current and future requirements
  • 12:40 Lunch

    14:00 INTELLIGENT DIGITAL IMAGE FUSION SYSTEMS FOR THE DISMOUNTED SOLDIER

    Dr Timothy Ostromek

    Dr Timothy Ostromek, Advanced Systems Engineering Manager, Litton Electro-Optical Systems

  • Advances in electronic digital design and image sensor integration have allowed for the design of a new class of battlefield night vision systems. The first of these are Litton Electro-Optical System’s dismounted image fusion systems (DIFS) which will provide the battlefield soldier with both image intensification and IR image sensing. Initial applications include observation, weapon sights and goggle systems.
  • 14:40 ADVANCED 12 TECHNOLOGY

    Dr Rudy Benz

    Dr Rudy Benz, Director, Sensor Technology, ITT Industries, Night Vision

    15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 OPERATING IN DARKNESS AND UNDER POOR VISIBILITY CONDITIONS

    Stefan Johansson

    Stefan Johansson, Development Manager, SaabTech Electronics, Optronics Division

  • Infrared detector technologies
  • Advantages of an add-on thermal imaging night sight
  • Customer requirements for medium range thermal imaging night sight
  • QWIP detector technology
  • Design of the BIRC thermal imager
  • The use of ATGW thermal imagers by the Swedish Army
  • 16:20 CONCEPTS AND DESIGN OF ADVANCED THERMAL IMAGER SYSTEMS

    Dr Gabby Sarusi

    Dr Gabby Sarusi, Research and Development Director, Thermal Imaging Operation, EI-OP

  • An overview of the current systems utilised
  • Selection criteria used to develop night vision equipment
  • The need for night vision technologies to be integrated within existing platforms in order to enable effective night time operations
  • The future of night vision equipment and future schedules for the development of new systems
  • 17:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-registraton and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Roy Thompson

    Roy Thompson, Projects Manager, Applied Imaging Group

    9:10 THE TECHNOLOGY CHALLENGES FOR SUPPORT OF NIGHT VISION EQUIPMENT

    Shaun Harris

    Shaun Harris, Combat Support Equipment Integrated Project Team Leader, Director General Equipment Support (Land), Defence Logistics Organisation, UK Ministry of Defence

  • Managing availability of capability
  • Technology – revolution or evolution?
  • Design for maintainability
  • Examples of key cost drivers
  • 9:40 IMAGING SENSORS FOR HELICOPTER PILOTAGE

    John Haigh

    John Haigh, Project Manager, DERA Malvern

  • Requirements for day/night all weather operations
  • Current night vision capability
  • Future sensor technologies
  • Image fusion methodologies to aid pilotage
  • Future research
  • 10:20 HELMET MOUNTED DISPLAYS IN DAY AND NIGHT OPERATIONS

    Alex Cameron

    Alex Cameron, Chief Systems Engineer, BAE SYSTEMS Avionics

  • HMDs –what are they and what do they do
  • HMDs and enhanced night vision today
  • Information management drivers
  • Technology and development trends
  • Next generation helmet mounted display system
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 MEASURING THE USEER INTERFACE PARAMETERS IN NIGHT-VISION AND OTHER HELMET MOUNTED DISPLAYS

    Tom Williams

    Tom Williams, Project Manager, Sira Electro-Optics

  • What are HMD’s, their advantages and how they can be used
  • The importance of correctly interfacing to the wearer
  • The critical optical parameters
  • Techniques for measuring these parameters
  • Requirements for routine checking of HMD’s
  • 12:00 A VIEW OF THE RUSSIAN ELECTRO-OPTICAL INDUSTRY IN TERMS OF ITS GEOGRAPHY AND TECHNICAL OUTPUT

    Tom Ryan

    Tom Ryan, Director, House of Optics

  • A brief history of the changes to that industry as a result of the end of the Soviet State
  • A historical perspective of the range, design, and build quality of Russian optical products
  • An explanation of the differences in Russian commercial practices that can emerge as trading difficulties for Western importers
  • An outline of the present range of optical and electro-optical equipment and sub-components available for military and civilian use
  • 12:40 Lunch

    14:00 ENHANCED VISION TECHONOLOGY FOR THE DISMOUNTED SOLDIER

    Steve Rickard

    Steve Rickard, Sales Manager - Infantry Night Vision, THALES Optics

  • Mobility systems
  • Surveillance and target acquisition
  • Target engagement
  • Human factors considerations
  • Integration into a future soldier system
  • 14:40 DAY AND NIGHT CAMERA SIGNALS ON LCD DISPLAYS

    Chris Lippens

    Chris Lippens, Vetronics Market Director, BARCOView

  • Differences between the images on an a CRT and LCD
  • Differences between a day and night camera signal
  • Are old evaluation techniques still valid?
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 CONCEPT, DESIGN AND APPLICATION OF ADVANCED CCD TECHNOLOGIES

    Neil Catlett

    Neil Catlett, Sales Engineer, Marconi Applied Technology

  • Enhanced image performance using solid state CCD technology
  • Competitive or complimentary technologies?
  • Effective night time operations – choosing the right technology
  • Further advances in L3 technology
  • 16:20 AN NIR ACTIVE IMAGING FOR POSITIVE IDENTIFICATION

    Pierre Galarneau

    Pierre Galarneau, Director, Laser System Technology, INO

  • Whatever the mission, there will always be a time when more details of the scene and better assessment of the situation will be required. Limited temperature contrast and reduced ambient light will make inoperative the thermal imagers and the image intensifiers alike.
  • In those circumstances, an NIR Active Television (ATV) imager may make the difference. Either for reading ship registration at long range or for identifying a group of individuals and their activity inside a darkened building , the ATV will provide a clear and immediate information better than any other imaging system.
  • 17:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

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