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Information technologies are already dramatically improving the ability to gather, process and disseminate information in real time. Protecting the effective and continuous operation of one’s own information systems, and being able to degrade, destroy or disrupt the functioning of the opponents, will become a major operational priority or focus. The Information Age will provide warfighters with a breadth and depth of information unparalleled in military history.

Information Warfare has become increasingly important in the modern battlefield. The abilities of C4I systems in providing information to the Commanders, is of course essential to the success of a battle. C4I is a huge subject at the moment focusing on whether on not the Information Age is driving a Revolution is Military Affairs (RMA). A RMA is defined as “an innovative application of technologies which, combined with dramatic changes in military doctrine and operational concepts, fundamentally alters the character and conduct of operations”

One of the fastest growing areas of C4I is within the air-power sphere.

C4I systems support the command and control process. They provide access to information and allow commanders to make effective use of this information. In modern aerial warfare, advanced technology is essential for automating the collection, processing, dissemination and protection of this information. Airborne C4I systems are vital for planning, executing and sustaining aerial, joint & multinational operations.

Topics to be discussed at Air C4I 2003 include:
· C4I Integration – A Challenge For The 21st Century Air Force
· C4I in Military Airborne Operations
· C4I Implementation and Interoperability Challenges
· Evaluating the Impact of C4I on Mission Effectiveness
· Procurement Programs for New C4I Capabilities
· Advanced Technology for C4I Decision Making
· Air C4I Architecture

Key speakers from Air C4I 2002 included:
· Charles L Houston, Senior Acquisition Systems Analyst, SAF/AQII, HQ US Air Force
· Colonel Joseph Smyth, Program Director MC2A, US Air Force
· Colonel Catherine Bacon, Reserve Advisor to the Commander, Air Force Command & Control, Intelligence, Surveillance & Reconnaissance Center
· Lieutenant Colonel Donald Hazelwood, Product Manager Army Airborne, Command and Control Systems, US Army
· Captain Bart van der Graaff, Officer Attached SAM & Ground Operations Division at Staff Tactical Air Force – HQ RNLAF, Royal Netherlands Air Force
· Richard O Bleau, System Program Director, Joint STARS Joint Program Office, US Air Force

Key delegates from Air C4I 2002 included:
· Lt Col John Koster, Product Manager, Aviation Mission Equipment, PEO Aviation, PM-AME
· Lt Col Keith Swenson, Action Officer, Joint Theater Air and Missile Defense Organisation
· Lt Cdr Per Bramming, Senior Research Officer, FOI
· Scott Hulett, Division Chief, International Program, US Air Force ESC/MAI
· Allen McKenzie, Chief, C2 Systems Design Branch, NATO C3 Agency
· Alain Clanet, Vice President, EADS Systems and Defence Electronics
· Matthew Copija, Senior Program Manager, Northrop Grumman
· Matther Opie, Project Manager, BAE SYSTEMS
· Cliff Johnson, Chief Technologist, L-3 Communications Systems
· Tormod Sveen, Program Manager, Thales Communications

Conference programme

8:30 Registration & Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Wing Commander (Ret’d) Andrew Brookes

Wing Commander (Ret’d) Andrew Brookes, Aerospace Analyst, International Institute for Strategic Studies

9:10 OPENING ADDRESS COMMAND AND CONTROL SYSTEM SUPPORTING JOINT OPERATIONS

Ronald Smith

Ronald Smith, Deputy General Manager, NACMA

  • Requirements behind NATO ACCS – why a NATO air C2 system?
  • Enabling member countries to harmonise their national efforts with international planning
  • Interoperability amongst air, naval and land capabilities
  • Defining the role of NACMA – central planning, systems engineering, implementation and configuration management
  • An architecture to provide flexibility and growth potential
  • Future timelines and programme development
  • 9:40 C2 SYSTEM WITHIN THE GERMAN AIR FORCE

  • Discuss the tasks and scope of C2-support of the German Air Force within the German forces framework
  • Present the forces and equipment to fulfil our missions - a conceptual point of view
  • Discuss our view on a high-level-IT-system Air Force and its main applications/systems
  • Present selected main areas of effort, as the GAFCCIS, the deployable HQ-System of the Air Force, Tactical Datalinks within GAF
  • Overview on actual commitments of C2-support-forces of the Air Force e.g. in ISAF
  • Planned major future developments as the evolution of one CCIS for German Forces, implementation of the ACCS system and SAP R/3
  • Lieutenant Colonel Ralf Gosch

    Lieutenant Colonel Ralf Gosch, GAF, AF Staff III 5, Ministry of Defence, Germany

    Colonel Kevin Dunleavy

    Colonel Kevin Dunleavy, Commander, Air Force Command and Control Training & Innovation Group, US Air Force

    Lieutenant Colonel Ralf Gosch

    Lieutenant Colonel Ralf Gosch, GAF, AF Staff III 5, Ministry of Defence, Germany

    10:20 BALTIC COMMAND AND CONTROL INFORMATION SYSTEM (BALTCCIS)

    Lieutenant Colonel Hans-Herbert Strunz

    Lieutenant Colonel Hans-Herbert Strunz, Executive Data Responsible Agency GAFCCIS and BALTCCIS Project Manager, German Air Force

  • Closing existing gap in the area of command and control information management
  • Standardisation of command and control procedures and formats
  • BALTCCIS project organisation
  • Technical specification – interoperable with the main NATO standards by standardised data exchange
  • Common and support functionality
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 PANEL DISCUSSION

    Ronald Smith

    Ronald Smith, Deputy General Manager, NACMA

    Colonel Kevin Dunleavy

    Colonel Kevin Dunleavy, Commander, Air Force Command and Control Training & Innovation Group, US Air Force

    Lieutenant Colonel Ralf Gosch

    Lieutenant Colonel Ralf Gosch, GAF, AF Staff III 5, Ministry of Defence, Germany

    12:00 ATTENTION TO BANDWIDTH; COMMAND AND CONTROL OF AIR AND SPACE FORCES

    Lieutenant Colonel Kurt Klausner

    Lieutenant Colonel Kurt Klausner, Deputy Commander, Air Mobility Command Communications Group, US Air Force

  • Developing an understanding of bandwidth within the air & space arena
  • Providing sufficient bandwidth to support forward operations
  • Recent operations and bandwidth demands:
  • Enduring Freedom/Iraqi Freedom
  • Bandwidth and the JFACC
  • Future trends and capabilities placing a demand on limited bandwidth
  • Recommendations for bandwidth and infrastructure
  • 12:40 Networking Lunch

    14:00 C4ISR AND THE AERIAL BATTLESPACE

    Alon Tikotzky

    Alon Tikotzky, Director, Business Development, RAFAEL Armament Development Authority

    14:40 DISTRIBUTED INFORMATION SYSTEMS ASSESSMENT

    George Blake

    George Blake, Systems Engineer, STARDIS, EDS Defence

  • STARDIS; an application within command and control operations for MoD purposes
  • Assessing and optimising information handling procedures and information infrastructure; computers, communications and human staff
  • Allowing a user to develop a dynamic model (simulation) of the operation of a distributed information system
  • Recent defence projects assessed using STARDIS:
  • WatchKeeper and Soothsayer
  • Forthcoming projects planned: FOAS and GBAD C4I
  • 15:20 Chairman’s Closing Remarks followed by Afternoon Tea. Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-registration & Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Squadron Leader Paul Casey, (Retd)

    Squadron Leader Paul Casey, (Retd), , Aerosytems International

    9:10 COALITION INEROPERABILITY IN A NETWORK CENTRIC WORLD

    Heinz Winter

    Heinz Winter, Senior System Consultant, Northrop Grumman Information Technology

    9:40 ISR SUPPORT TO TIME CRITICAL TARGETING

    Herb Kemp

    Herb Kemp, Vice President and Manager, C4ISR Operations Division, Adroit Systems

  • Command and control of ISR resources
  • Collaborative data exploitation
  • Handling information overload
  • Information engineering solutions
  • Challenges for the future
  • 10:20 FUTURE OFFENSIVE AIR SYSTEM AND DATA LINKS

    Mike Beever

    Mike Beever, Principal Consultant, Space and Defence Division, LogicaCMG

  • FOAS C4ISTAR communications concepts and architectures
  • Platform and system interoperability
  • Reduce technical risk and increase technology readiness
  • Communications capability of future offensive air operations
  • Providing core elements of the MoD's network enabled capability
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 TDL AND NETWORK MANAGEMENT TO SUPPORT AIR C4I

    Squadron Leader Paul Casey, (Retd)

    Squadron Leader Paul Casey, (Retd), , Aerosytems International

  • Information exploitation for air operations
  • Tactical data link system & operational benefits
  • UK tactical data link roadmap
  • Warfighter capabilities
  • Way ahead
  • 12:00 COMMAND AND CONTROL TRAINING RESEARCH

    Michael Paley

    Michael Paley, Vice President, Technical Development, Aptima

    12:40 Chairman’s Closing Remarks followed by Afternoon Tea. Close of Conference

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

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