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Programme highlights:

· Identify the key advances in maintenance concepts
· Discover the most efficient, cost effective approach
· Review existing examples
· Develop key contacts through this focused networking forum
· Learn the future trends in whole life support

A unique opportunity to learn from military, government & research experts including:
Major General Mitchell Stevenson, US Army Chief of Ordnance; Commanding General, US Army Ordnance Center and Schools
Gordon Campbell, Principal Deputy to the Commanding General for Acquisition, US Army Combined Arms Support Command
Colonel Toby Mills, Engineering and Asset Management Capability Change Team Leader (E&AM CCTL), DLO
Wing Commander David Appleton, RCM Group Leader, DLO CTS RCM Group
Major Donald Humpert, Operations Analyst, Readiness and Analysis Department, US Marine Corps Materiel Command (MARCORMATCOM)
Andy Worrall, Head of ILS Policy, MoD
Michael DiUlio, Program Manager, NAVSEA 05Z53
Tim Russell, Manager, Strategic Business Development, NAMSA
Timothy Bassett, Executive Director and Chief Engineer, SUBMEPP (Submarine Maintenance Engineering Planning and Procurement)

“ A good forum to develop an understanding of a live topic”
Previous SMi Delegate: Paul Kettle, General Manager, VICKERS Specialist Engineers

Conference programme

8:30 Registration and Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Stephen Hunt

Stephen Hunt, Director, Aspire Consulting

9:10 KEYNOTE ADDRESS

Major General Mitchell Stevenson

Major General Mitchell Stevenson, US Army Chief of Ordnance; Commanding General, US Army Ordnance Center and Schools

  • Characteristics of current four-level maintenance system
  • Evolution of the battlefield
  • Changes in organizational structure
  • Transition to field and sustainment maintenance
  • Benefits of two-level maintenance system
  • Action plan for implementation
  • 9:40 US ARMY TRANSFORMATION TO TWO-LEVEL MAINTENANCE

    Gordon Campbell

    Gordon Campbell, Principal Deputy to the Commanding General for Acquisition, Combined Arms Support Command, US Army

  • Two-level maintenance: a perspective
  • Keys to successful & effective two-level maintenance
  • Systems integration: enabler trade-off limitations
  • Systems maintenance: competency, capability & capacity
  • Contractors on the battlefield: have systems – will travel…
  • The future: tooth, tail, spear points and other erroneous analogies
  • 10:20 TRANSFORMING LOGISTICS CAPABILITY INTO READINESS

    Major Donald Humpert

    Major Donald Humpert, Operations Analyst, Readiness and Analysis Department, US Marine Corps Materiel Command (MARCORMATCOM)

  • The depot contribution
  • Theory of constraints solutions
  • Combining project management and production management
  • The lean thinking 6S concept
  • Summary
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 TRANSFORMING ENGINEERING & ASSET MANAGEMENT IN THE UK MOD

    Colonel Toby Mills

    Colonel Toby Mills, Engineering and Asset Management Capability Change Team Leader (E&AM CCTL), Defence Logistics Organisation, Ministry of Defence, UK

  • Identifying data requirements and information flow
  • End-to-end process change
  • Implementing a management information system – an incremental approach
  • Supporting contractor logistic support options
  • Whole fleet management
  • Enabling Reliability Centred Maintenance
  • 12:00 RCM

    Wing Commander David Appleton

    Wing Commander David Appleton, RCM Group Leader, DLO CTS RCM Group

  • Background - where we are with the RCM HoS - tri-service convergence
  • Delivery of RCM - environment (land, sea and air) needs
  • Benefits - lever to reducing operating costs - managing safety/airworthiness - operational benefits/availability
  • Future developments - convergence of policy and processes - coherent end-to-end process - partnering to deliver maximum benefits
  • 12:40 Lunch

    14:00 MAINTENANCE

    Dr Derek Wright

    Dr Derek Wright, Director of Logistics, Acquisition and Logistics Unit, Department of Defence Management Security Analysis, Cranfield University, Royal Military College of Science

  • Who is the customer/user
  • Why does it matter
  • What is best in class in “service”
  • Measuring service performance
  • Business reasons for being service orientated
  • 14:40 INTERNATIONAL COOPERATIVE LOGISTICS

    Tim Russell

    Tim Russell, Manager, Strategic Business Development, NATO Maintenance and Supply Agency

  • Key principles on which NAMSA operates
  • Reducing the logistic cost
  • Scope of NAMSA activities
  • Examples of current logistics and contingency support elogistics at NAMSA
  • Development objectives and plans
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 CASE STUDIES

    Wayne Pheasey

    Wayne Pheasey, RCM/MSG-3 Project Manager and Trainer, LSC Group

  • Example of a practical application of the RCM methodology in the form of a case study
  • Details and providing real life examples of each stage of an RCM study
  • RCM deliverables described
  • Benefits of RCM analysis discussed within the context of a real-world example
  • First steps to implementing a RCM programme reviewed
  • How data captured during RCM analysis can be used to rationalise stockholding – the WSA solution
  • 16:20 TRILOGI

  • trilogi partnering principles
  • Saving money through standardisation
  • trilogi technology overview
  • Catering for legacy and future programmes
  • What does it mean for end users?
  • What does it mean for OEMs?
  • Edward Frankland

    Edward Frankland, , BAE SYSTEMS Information Services

    Jim Gallagher

    Jim Gallagher, , Defence Logistics Organisation Corporate Technical Services

    Chris Wood

    Chris Wood, , BAE SYSTEMS Information Services

    17:00 Chairman's Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    17:10 DRINKS RECEPTION
    SPONSORED BY:
    BAE SYSTEMS trilogy DLO

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Stephen Hunt

    Stephen Hunt, Director, Aspire Consulting

    9:10 INTEGRATED LOGISTICS SUPPORT

    Andy Worrall

    Andy Worrall, Head of ILS Policy, Defence Logistics Organisation, Ministry of Defence, UK

  • Aims, objectives and how managed within the MoD
  • Role of ILS within the new business processes
  • Major goals - optimum whole life support
  • Elements of ILS and why use them?
  • MoD ILS planning
  • ILS data standards
  • 9:40 SUBMARINE CLASS MAINTENANCE PLANNING

    Timothy Bassett

    Timothy Bassett, Executive Director and Chief Engineer, SUBMEPP (Submarine Maintenance Engineering Planning and Procurement)

  • Maintenance plans
  • Maintenance planning process
  • Feedback data management
  • Reliability Centred Maintenance
  • SUBMEPP key and key support processes integration
  • Future direction
  • 10:20 REVOLUTIONIZING MAINTENANCE

    Michael DiUlio

    Michael DiUlio, Program Manager, NAVSEA 05Z53

  • What is ICAS?
  • Functionality
  • ICAS navy program relationship
  • Utilization
  • Return on investment
  • The future
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 MAINTENANCE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

  • Impact of mobile devices for work recording
  • Integrated data presentation for the maintainer
  • ASP delivery business model
  • Implications of CLS on system design
  • David Stroud

    David Stroud, Chief Executive Officer, sparesFinder

    David Stroud

    David Stroud, CEO, sparesFinder

    Tom Samuel

    Tom Samuel, Head of UK IS Programmes, Aerosystems International

    12:00 MOBILE AND WIRELESS TECHNOLOGY AT WORK

    Frank Kalas

    Frank Kalas, Senior Principal and Aviation Practice Manager, American Management Systems

  • Mobile and wireless technology trends
  • Modifying legacy system paradigms
  • Improving speed, accuracy and efficiency of data capture
  • Importance of data integrity
  • The power of innovative thinking
  • 12:40 Lunch

    14:00 COLLABORATIVE ASSET LIFECYCLE MANAGEMENT (CALM)

    Simon Johnson

    Simon Johnson, Director of Defence, Indus International

  • Enabling software tools and the utilisation of information sharing capabilities of the Internet
  • Maximisation of opportunities within modern maintenance management
  • Collaborative work-management software to enable cost reduction and operational effectiveness
  • 14:40 ARMY SUPPORT ACTIVITY

    John Peer

    John Peer, Chief, Engineering, Logistics & Field Support Center, USAMC Logistics Support Activity

  • Overview of current status
  • Materiel readiness support
  • Developing logistics systems
  • Available critical readiness tools
  • Enhancing readiness posture
  • The future
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 AIT IN MAINTENANCE OPERATIONS

    John Waddick

    John Waddick, Logistic Management Specialist, PM AIT, PEO EIS

  • Background
  • AIT vision and program
  • Maintenance AIT objectives
  • Initiatives
  • The ARTOC program
  • Future target
  • 16:20 SHIP MAINTENANCE

    Beau Brinckerhoff

    Beau Brinckerhoff, Senior Materials Engineer, Corrosion Control Division, Naval Sea Systems Command, US Navy

  • Overview or requirements
  • Performance measures
  • Technology development methodology
  • Implementation
  • Major initiative areas
  • The future
  • 17:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

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    Workshops

    The Role of Reliability Centred Maintenance in Defence Maintenance
    Workshop

    The Role of Reliability Centred Maintenance in Defence Maintenance

    The Hatton, at etc. venues
    12th March 2003
    London, United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    51/53 Hatton Garden
    London EC1N 8HN
    United Kingdom

    The Hatton, at etc. venues

    HOTEL BOOKING FORM

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

    ‘Input’ based schemes list a precise number of CPD hours that individuals must achieve within a given time period. These schemes can also use different ‘currencies’ such as points, merits, units or credits, where an individual must accumulate the number required. These currencies are usually based on time i.e. 1 CPD point = 1 hour of learning.

    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

    CPD Certificates

    We can provide a certificate for all our accredited events. To request a CPD certificate for a conference , workshop, master classes you have attended please email events@smi-online.co.uk

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