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Today's uncertain world is placing new demands on the Armed Forces. We need forces that are hard hitting, flexible, and that can move quickly to wherever they are needed.

The need for a force with these capabilities was originally recognised, within the UK, with the formation of the Joint Rapid Deployment Force in 1996. The Strategic Defence Review, the major restructuring of forces to meet the challenges of the new Millennium, acknowledged the strengths of the Joint Rapid Deployment Force and sought to build on them. To produce more capable, better-supported joint forces with the strategic transport to make them truly deployable to crisis around the world.

Future operations will place greater emphasis on projecting military force rapidly and over long distances. In this new strategic environment our Armed Forces require a powerful and deployable cutting edge based on improved interoperability between the Services.

A nation can create a pool of Joint Rapid Reaction Forces, bringing together all readily available forces from all three Services. From this pool a nation can draw the right mix of forces to mount short-notice, medium-scale operations of all kinds - from disaster relief to high intensity war-fighting – under NATO, European, UN coalition or national auspices. Joint Rapid Reaction Forces will be ready to deploy in phases – or echelons – supported by a range of enabling capabilities.

As an inaugural conference there will be an initial need to develop and understand the concept of Rapid Reaction Deployment and the capabilities of Rapid Reaction Forces. The conference needs to disclose the thought processes involved in Rapid Reaction Deployment and the application within modern warfighting mediums.

There are several main areas to be assessed within Rapid Reaction Deployment:

The kind of missions it will need to address (e.g. Peace operations, forced entry, area defence, local attack) The environment that it will need to operate in (eg open, closed, urban, contaminated) The level of threat it will need to defeat (eg. size, level of sophistication) The responsiveness with which it will need to deploy (eg. few days, week, few weeks)

Programme highlights:
· IDENTIFY the role of rapid reaction deployment in the 21st Century
· DISCOVER the most efficient, cost effective and capable systems
· REVIEW the major operational and research based programmes
· DEVELOP key contacts through this focused networking forum
· LEARN the future trends in air defence systems

Gain an insight from the key military and industry speakers in the field including:
· Major Grant Dick, Chief Long Range Strategic Plans, US Air Force Air Mobility Command, USAF
· Group Captain Peter Gray, Assistant Director, Joint Warfare, Ministry of Defence, UK
· Erik Sandahl, Crisis Management and Operations Directorate, NATO HQ
· Brigadier General Sten Edholm, Commander of SHIRBRIG, Swedish Armed Forces
· Krzysztof Osinski, Deputy Director, Defence Policy Department, Ministry of National Defence, Poland
· Dr Pauli Järvenpää, Head of Department, Defence Policy, Ministry of Defence, Finland
· Colonel Rûtz, Director European Airlift Co-ordination Cell (EACC), French Air Force
· Captain (N) Gunnar Borch, Director Sealift Co-ordination Cell (SCC), Netherlands Royal Navy
· Otfried Nassauer, Director, Berlin Information centre for Transatlantic Security

Conference programme

8:30 Registration and Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Otfried Nasseur

Otfried Nasseur, Director, Berlin Information centre for Transatlantic Security

9:10 IMPLEMENTING JOINT CAPABILITIES

Group Captain Peter Gray

Group Captain Peter Gray, Assistant Director, Joint Warfare, Ministry of Defence, UK

  • JRRF: fulfilling the global watch and global reliability aim
  • An analysis of deployment, sustainment and recovery of the JRRF
  • An overview of readiness and training across five components (land, sea, air, special forces and logistics)
  • Examples of the peace keeping force in previous operations
  • Involvement in disaster relief and high intensity war fighting operations
  • 9:40 SHIRBRIG

    Brigadier General Sten Edholm

    Brigadier General Sten Edholm, Commander SHIRBRIG, Swedish Armed Forces

  • Background and operational concept
  • UN needs for rapid deployment
  • Readiness and training requirements
  • Lessons learned from the UN Mission to Ethiopia/Eritrea (UNIMEE)
  • Options for the future
  • 10:20 FINLAND’S MULTINATIONAL CO-OPERATION INITIATIVES

    Dr Pauli Järvenpää

    Dr Pauli Järvenpää, Head of Department, Defence Policy, Ministry of Defence, Finland

  • An examination of the need for mult-inational initiatives
  • Finland’s participation in rapid deployment operations
  • Improving military training to meet changing requirements
  • Future developments and policies
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 THE OPERATIONAL CAPABILITIES CONCEPT (OCC)

    Krzysztof Osinski

    Krzysztof Osinski, Deputy Director, Defence Policy Department, Ministry of National Defence, Poland

  • An overview of Poland’s contribution to the PfP
  • Operational developments of the Partnership of Peace
  • The need for a deeper operational unity
  • Enhancing PfP’s capabilities through closer military co-operation
  • Challenges encountered while improving the interoperability of partner forces
  • 12:00 EUROPEAN MOVES TOWARDS A RAPID REACTION CONCEPT

    Otfried Nassauer

    Otfried Nassauer, Director, Berlin Information centre for Transatlantic Security

  • An analysis of the ESDP context
  • An examination of core aspects of the EU-NATO relationship
  • An analysis of the importance of integrated European forces and the consequences of developing politics for using them
  • Modernising European forces effectively – the need for new approaches
  • A look into the future
  • 12:40 Lunch

    14:00 AIRLIFT AND SEALIFT CO-ORDINATION CELL

  • European Airlift Co-ordination Cell

    History

    Objectives

  • Achievements

    Current development

  • Sealift Co-ordination Cell

    Why a Sealift Co-ordination Cell?

  • Objectives

    Terms of Reference

  • Organisation

    Method of work

  • Issues to be solved

    The Future

  • Colonel Philipe Rutz

    Colonel Philipe Rutz, Director, European Airlift Co-ordination Cell (EACC), French Air Force

    Captain (N) Gunnar Borch

    Captain (N) Gunnar Borch, Director Sealift Co-ordination Cell (SCC), Royal Norwegian Navy

    14:40 RAPID REACTION FORCES AND COMMUNICATION

    Steven Bridges

    Steven Bridges, Technical Advisor, Air Command Systems, Thales Defence Information Systems

  • Introduction
  • Needs
  • Problems
  • Solutions
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 “DEPLOY, PLUG AND COMMAND

    Olivier De Peufeilhoux

    Olivier De Peufeilhoux, Head of Army and Joint C3I, EADS / Systems and Defence Electronics

  • Continuous training
  • During operations on-line assistance
  • Remote C3I administration and support
  • Data providing
  • 16:20 HIGH MOBILITY SHELTER CONCEPTS FOR RAPID DEPLOYMENT FORCES

  • Traditional solutions
  • Available concepts
  • Future requirements
  • Trends
  • Stein F. Walle

    Stein F. Walle, Sales and Marketing Director, Uniteam International

    Stein F. Walle

    Stein F. Walle, Sales and Marketing Director, Uniteam International

    17:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Captain (Ret’d) Gordon Wilson

    Captain (Ret’d) Gordon Wilson, , Independent Strategic Analyst

    9:10 UNDERSTANDING THE CONCEPT OF RAPID REACTION DEPLOYMENT

    Captain (Ret’d) Gordon Wilson

    Captain (Ret’d) Gordon Wilson, , Independent Strategic Analyst

  • An analysis of the ideas behind rapid reaction deployment
  • Understanding the background for the requirements of rapid reaction deployment
  • An examination of the need for interoperability of the NATO states
  • An analysis of how to provide support to troops on international operations
  • The challenges involved in multi-national coalitions
  • 9:40 REFLECTING ON PAST EXPERIENCES

    Erik Sandahl

    Erik Sandahl, Crisis Management and Operations Directorate, Defence Planning and Operations Division, NATO, HQ

  • An evaluation of common objectives
  • Involvement of Alliance in the Kosovo crisis
  • An analysis of the means NATO has applied in Kosovo
  • An examination of the support from neighbouring countries
  • 10:20 AIR MOBILITY STRATEGIC PLANNING

    Major Grant Dick

    Major Grant Dick, Chief Long Range Strategic Plans, US Air Force Air Mobility Command, USAF

  • Strategic planning process and partners
  • Capabilities based
  • Modernising while we transform air mobility to meet the challenges of the future environment
  • Near term challenges
  • Far term solutions
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 EUROPEAN SOLUTION TO RAPID REACTION AIRLIFT REQUIREMENTS

    Air Commodore (Ret’d) Brian Poulton

    Air Commodore (Ret’d) Brian Poulton, Military Advisor, Airbus Military

  • The military requirements behind the A400M
  • The A400M’s key features and capabilities
  • Airlifting support helicopters and armoured vehicles
  • Multi-role versatility of the standard A400M
  • The impact of A400M on rapid deployments
  • 12:00 THE IMPORTANCE OF PRE-POSITIONING

  • The threat
  • Methods to speed response: land-based and afloat pre-positioning - unit equipment - ammunition - sustainment
  • Methods to speed response: strategic lift - airlift - surge shipping - Ready Reserve Force
  • Coalition considerations in pre-positioning
  • Ray Shaible

    Ray Shaible, Program Director, Operational Logistics Group, Logistics Management Institute

    James Weiss

    James Weiss, Program Manager, Operational Logistics, Logistics Management Institute

    12:40 Lunch

    14:00 ISTAR SUPPORT TO RAPID REACTION DEPLOYMENT

    Morten Jarodd

    Morten Jarodd, Director of Business Development, Thales Communications

  • Deployment
  • Area monitoring
  • Multi Sensor fusion
  • Information dissemination
  • 14:40 INTEROPERABILITY IN DEPLOYMENT WITH MOBILE FORCES

    Juan Manuel Castro

    Juan Manuel Castro, Director, SW Department, Amper Programas

  • Architecture
  • Optimisation over Combat Net Radio
  • Multi-Stack Protocols extension
  • High echelon integration
  • International interoperability
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 SPANISH C2IS TO COVER RAPID REACTION DEPLOYMENT

    Miguel Sancho

    Miguel Sancho, Marketing Director (C2IS area), Amper Programas

  • Only one system to cover from operational level to isolate vehicle
  • Analysis of the supporting platforms and COTS used
  • Flexibility using tactical telecommunications supports
  • Replication solution
  • Adaptation to real deployment needs
  • Interoperability with other systems
  • 16:20 TRANSFORMATION AND INTEROPERABILITY

    Peter Berghammer

    Peter Berghammer, Chief Executive Officer, Copernio

  • Maximisation of "shared resources"
  • Joint operations environments
  • Strategic transport, logistics and command/control
  • 17:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

    ‘A commitment to structured skills and knowledge enhancement for Personal or Professional competence’

    CPD is a common requirement of individual membership with professional bodies and Institutes. Increasingly, employers also expect their staff to undertake regular CPD activities.

    Undertaken over a period of time, CPD ensures that educational qualifications do not become obsolete, and allows for best practice and professional standards to be upheld.

    CPD can be undertaken through a variety of learning activities including instructor led training courses, seminars and conferences, e:learning modules or structured reading.

    CPD AND PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES

    There are approximately 470 institutes in the UK across all industry sectors, with a collective membership of circa 4 million professionals, and they all expect their members to undertake CPD.

    For some institutes undertaking CPD is mandatory e.g. accountancy and law, and linked to a licence to practice, for others it’s obligatory. By ensuring that their members undertake CPD, the professional bodies seek to ensure that professional standards, legislative awareness and ethical practices are maintained.

    CPD Schemes often run over the period of a year and the institutes generally provide online tools for their members to record and reflect on their CPD activities.

    TYPICAL CPD SCHEMES AND RECORDING OF CPD (CPD points and hours)

    Professional bodies and Institutes CPD schemes are either structured as ‘Input’ or ‘Output’ based.

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    ‘Output’ based schemes are learner centred. They require individuals to set learning goals that align to professional competencies, or personal development objectives. These schemes also list different ways to achieve the learning goals e.g. training courses, seminars or e:learning, which enables an individual to complete their CPD through their preferred mode of learning.

    The majority of Input and Output based schemes actively encourage individuals to seek appropriate CPD activities independently.

    As a formal provider of CPD certified activities, SMI Group can provide an indication of the learning benefit gained and the typical completion. However, it is ultimately the responsibility of the delegate to evaluate their learning, and record it correctly in line with their professional body’s or employers requirements.

    GLOBAL CPD

    Increasingly, international and emerging markets are ‘professionalising’ their workforces and looking to the UK to benchmark educational standards. The undertaking of CPD is now increasingly expected of any individual employed within today’s global marketplace.

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