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Combat ID & IFF will identify the key policies behind the advancement of combat identification. Country specific, as well as collaborative, initiatives will be addressed, examining their proposals and actions for eliminating the challenge of fratricide including the issue of training. Evidently, mission effectiveness is directly dependent on doctrinal and organisational interoperability in the current coalition environment.

Benefits of Attending:
· REVIEW the current developments in combat identification
· HEAR international perspectives on solutions to the problem of combat identification on the battlefield
· UNDERSTAND initiatives being put in place to reduce blue on blue incidents
· DISCOVER the latest technological developments in combat identification
· DEVELOP key contacts through this focused networking forum
· EVALUATE the effectiveness of current combat ID technology

A unique opportunity to learn from leading experts including:
· Anthony Lisuzzo, Director, Intelligence and Information Warfare Directorate, US Army
· Pete Glikerdas, Chief, Combat Identification SPO, US Army
· Tim Banfield, Director, National Audit Office
· Colonel Nick Justice, Project Manager, FBCB2 Blue Force Tracking, US Army
· Colonel Christopher Gallavan, Director Strategic Programmes and Policy, US Army Safety Centre
· Richard Gifford, Project Leader, Single Integrated Ground Picture, Intelligence and Information Warfare Directorate, US Army
· Lieutenant Colonel Douglas Kuehl, Product Manager, Target Identification & Meteorological Sensors, US Army
· Wing Commander Chris Norton DFC, Officer Commanding, No 1 Fighter Squadron, Royal Air Force
· Andre Hastie, Programme Manager, RF tags, US Army
· Brian Hughes, US Representative to NATO Identification System Co-ordination Office (NISCO), NATO HQ
· Johanna Lindquist, Project Manager, SWIFF, FMV
· Carl Fischerstrom, Head of Tactical Sensor Systems, FMV
· Major Bruno Guichemerre, IFF New Generation Programme Officer and ID Systems, FAF Staff
· Major John America, Ground Combat Element Branch Head, Technology Division, Marine Corps Warfighting Laboratory, US Marine Corps
·Lieutenant Colonel Joseph A. Giunta Jr Product Manager, Ground Combat Tactical Trainers, U.S. Army, PEO STRI
· Major Ray Major Compton, Project Director ROC-V, U.S. Army, PEO STRI
· Ralph Nichols, JRTC Military Analyst, US Army Centre for Army Lessons Learned

Conference programme

8:30 Registration and Coffee

9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

Dr Malcolm Cook

Dr Malcolm Cook, Senior Lecturer, University of Abertay

9:10 UNITED KINGDOM

Tim Banfield

Tim Banfield, Defence Director, National Audit Office

  • The National Audit Office
  • The challenge of delivering combat ID
  • Progress
  • What more can be done? - focusing on capability - co-operation and interoperability - key influences on successful acquisition
  • 9:40 TRAINING TO IMPROVE COMBAT IDENTIFICATION

  • Current status and way ahead for visual and thermal Combat Vehicle Identification
  • Utilising ROC-V to improve combat recognition
  • Identifying the thermal signatures of combat vehicles
  • Providing soldiers with practical experience in the use of their thermal sensor image controls
  • The Importance vehicle combat recognition training
  • Lieutenant Colonel Joseph A. Giunta Jr

    Lieutenant Colonel Joseph A. Giunta Jr, Product Manager, Ground Combat Tactical Trainers, U.S. Army, PEO STRI

    Major Ray Major Compton

    Major Ray Major Compton, Project Director ROC-V, U.S. Army, PEO STRI

    10:20 NATO

    Brian Hughes

    Brian Hughes, US Representative to NATO Identification System Co-ordination Office (NISCO), NATO HQ

  • Issues faced by NATO when using coalition forces
  • The importance of interoperability between NATO forces
  • Technology developments through NATO to enhance coalition interoperability
  • Lessons learned in previous NATO operations
  • The way forward for NATO combat ID programmes
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 FRANCE

  • French vision and current requirements for combat ID systems
  • Developments within French combat ID: - BIFF - DIC - IFF - Mode 5 / Mode S - IDCP
  • Interoperability issues
  • Major Bruno Guichemerre

    Major Bruno Guichemerre, IFF New Generation Programme Officer and ID Systems, FAF Staff

    Jean Roumier

    Jean Roumier, IFF Segment Policy Manager, Thales Communications

    12:00 SWEDISH PROGRAMMES

  • Requirements for combat identification systems
  • Activities within Swedish combat ID systems
  • Testing current systems
  • The importance of interoperable combat identification systems
  • Johanna Lindquist

    Johanna Lindquist, Project Manager, SWIFF, FMV

    Carl Fischerstrom

    Carl Fischerstrom, Head of Tactical Sensor Systems, FMV

    12:40 Networking Lunch

    14:00 HUMAN FACTORS

    Claire Outteridge

    Claire Outteridge, Consultant Psychologist, QinetiQ

  • Examining historical evidence of fratricide
  • Fratricide and causality (from a human-centric perspective)
  • The role of situational awareness in incidents of fratricide
  • Exploiting human factors to reduce the risk of fratricide
  • The importance of training in risk reduction
  • 14:40 VISUAL IDENTIFICATION

    Dr Malcolm Cook

    Dr Malcolm Cook, Senior Lecturer, University of Abertay

  • The role of visual identification on the battlefield - Target and operational diversity - Battlefield obscurants
  • New technologies - Multi-Spectral Identification - optical, thermal, MMW and SAR sensing
  • Automating target recognition and identification
  • Blue force disposition systems
  • Network sensing contributions
  • Interoperability issues
    Targeting interfaces and fratricide
  • 15:20 Afternoon Tea

    15:40 TACTICAL ID FROM THE AIR PERSPECTIVE

    Wing Commander Chris Norton DFC

    Wing Commander Chris Norton DFC, Officer Commanding No 1 Fighter Squadron, Royal Air Force

    16:20 COMBAT IDENTIFICATION (CID) INSIGHTS FROM OEF/OIF

    Ralph Nichols

    Ralph Nichols, JRTC Military Analyst, US Army Centre for Army Lessons Learned

  • US Army’s multi-faceted approach to fratricide prevention
  • Examples of OEF/OIF fratricides during combat operations
  • CID insights from OEF/OIF
  • Mitigating fratricide risks
  • Future developments in combat identification
  • 17:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Day One

    8:30 Re-registration and Coffee

    9:00 Chairman's Opening Remarks

    Dr Malcolm Cook

    Dr Malcolm Cook, Senior Lecturer, University of Abertay

    9:10 THE US ARMY SPO

    Pete Glikerdas

    Pete Glikerdas, Chief, Combat Identification SPO, US Army

  • Current US Army combat identification requirements
  • US Army development of network centric technologies for coalition combat identification
  • Battlefield Target Identification Device (BTID)
  • Radio-Based Combat Identification (RBCI)
  • Radio Frequency Tags (RF Tags)
  • Dismounted Soldier Identification (DSID)
    US Army Air Defence Interrogator (ADI)
  • 9:40 TRAINING TO IMPROVE COMBAT IDENTIFICATION

  • Current status and way ahead for visual and thermal Combat Vehicle Identification The Importance vehicle combat recognition training
  • Utilising ROC-V to improve combat recognition
  • Identifying the thermal signatures of combat vehicles
  • Training techniques that will reduce the risk of friendly fire in combat operations
  • Lieutenant Colonel Joseph A. Giunta Jr

    Lieutenant Colonel Joseph A. Giunta Jr, Product Manager, Ground Combat Tactical Trainers, U.S. Army, PEO STRI

    Major Ray Major Compton

    Major Ray Major Compton, Project Director ROC-V, U.S. Army, PEO STRI

    10:20 COMBAT IDENTIFICATION AND SITUATIONAL AWARENESS

    Major John America

    Major John America, Ground Combat Element Branch Head, Technology Division, Marine Corps Warfighting Laboratory, US Marine Corps

  • Developing a dismounted combat identification system for the marines
  • The rifle mounted laser illuminator combat identification system
  • Integrating combat ID systems with current equipment
  • US marine corps requirements for combat identification systems
  • Future combat ID program development
  • 11:00 Morning Coffee

    11:20 IMPROVING IDENTIFICATION ON THE BATTLEFIELD

    Andre Hastie

    Andre Hastie, Programme Manager, RF tags, US Army

  • Developing RF tags to reduce fratricide events
  • Capabilities of the RF tag system
  • Project development milestones
  • 12:00 PANEL DISCUSSION

    Anthony Lisuzzo

    Anthony Lisuzzo, Director, Intelligence and Information Warfare Directorate, US Army

    Pete Glikerdas

    Pete Glikerdas, Chief, Combat Identification SPO, US Army

    Andre Hastie

    Andre Hastie, Programme Manager, RF tags, US Army

    Richard Gifford

    Richard Gifford, Project Leader, Single Integrated Ground Picture, Intelligence and Information Warfare Directorate, US Army

    12:40 Networking Lunch

    14:00 BLUE FORCE TRACKING AND FBCB2

    Colonel Nick Justice

    Colonel Nick Justice, Project Manager, FBCB2 Blue Force Tracking, US Army

  • Technology harnessed in blue force tracking and FBCB2
  • The role of FBCB2 in reducing blue on blue incidents
  • The importance of situational awareness on the battlefield
  • The performance of FBCB2 in combat conditions
  • Future developments in the FBCB2 system
  • 14:00 SITUATIONAL AWARENESS

    Richard Gifford

    Richard Gifford, Project Leader, Single Integrated Ground Picture, Intelligence and Information Warfare Directorate, US Army

  • The benefits of situational awareness in reducing blue on blue and blue on grey incidents
  • Tracking ground objects in theatre
  • Fusing near and real time data
  • Interoperability between services and coalition partners
  • 14:40 PREVENTING FRATRICIDE

    Colonel Christopher Gallavan

    Colonel Christopher Gallavan, Director Strategic Programmes and Policy, US Army Safety Centre

  • US army doctrine regarding the prevention of fratricide
  • Training to reduce the risk of blue on blue incidents
  • The US Army Safety Centre’s initiatives in combat identification
  • Technological requirements to improve combat identification
  • 15:20 COMBAT ID

    Dr Charles Kirke

    Dr Charles Kirke, , Kirke Research and Consulting Ltd

  • Technology at the point of fire
  • Information point in which the firer is embedded
  • The importance of the firer’s physical and cognitive condition
  • 16:00 Chairman’s Closing Remarks and Close of Conference

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    WHAT IS CPD?

    CPD stands for Continuing Professional Development’. It is essentially a philosophy, which maintains that in order to be effective, learning should be organised and structured. The most common definition is:

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